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22

Obligatory Summary The Jewish day starts at night, but V'sein Tal Umatar is based on solar calendar, so it can sometimes be a day later. Plus the date was established in Julian Calendar, so there's also the Julian->Gregorian shift to keep us busy... Real Answer The Gemara (Taanis 10a) says that in Bavel we start saying V'sein Tal Umatar on the 60th day ...


20

Yes. The website uses UTC time. Since I live on the west coast in the US, each "website day" starts at 5 PM. Thus, I simply visit the site after 5 PM on Friday, which during the summer months is not yet Shabbos, and then visit again before 5 PM on Sunday. As far as the website is concerned, I just visited on two consecutive days. The only remaining problem ...


14

Rabbi Yissachar Dov Illowy (Rabbi Dr. Bernard Illowy), a talmid of the Ksav Sofer, was the Rav of New Orleans at the time of the Civil War, and commented favorably on the right of the Confederacy to secede from the Union. For more information about him, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Illowy and http://www.yieb.org/schedules/classes/187.html ...


12

Since it includes Reform and Conservative organizations in its roster. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agudath_Israel_of_America#Positions In 1956 for example, the moetzes issued a written ruling forbidding Orthodox rabbis to join with any Reform or Conservative rabbis in rabbinical communal professional organizations that then united the various ...


11

Minchas Chinuch argues that indeed, when the Sanhedrin was functioning and we used an observation-based calendar, Chanukah in outlying places would have had to have been celebrated for nine days. "When the Beis Hamikdash is rebuilt, speedily in our days," he says, "and we go back to sanctifying the months based on observation - then faraway places (for Eretz ...


11

From Nefesh HaRav by Rabbi Herschel Schachter, shlita,: "The Rishonim [end of Tractate Pesachim] ask the following: 'Why don't we count Sefirat HaOmer each night twice [i.e., "today is the second day," and "today is the first day," etc.] due to the doubtful day?' "HaRav Joseph B. Soloveitchik, zt"l, heard a reason why we do not do ...


10

We only add an extra day for a D’oraisa like the ‘Sholosh Regalim’. Chanukah is a D’Rabbanan. (See Taamei Minhagim 864 in the name of the Avudraham) In addition as Chanuka starts on the 25th day of the Hebrew month we can presume that the Sheluchei Beis Din would have arrived and everyone would know when it actually began.


10

Hands down it is - not saying Birchas Kohanim on a daily basis


10

I have heard - though I don't know of any written source for this - that the Divrei Chaim, R' Chaim of Sanz (1793-1876), was critical of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation (or maybe more generally of his anti-slavery stance), seeing it as flouting Noach's prophecy as recorded in Gen. 9:25. Apparently I had my facts doubly wrong: This statement is ...


10

Haym Solomon in a teshuva of the Pnei Aryeh http://onthemainline.blogspot.com/2010/09/haym-solomon-of-philadelphia-in-18th.html also see here http://onthemainline.blogspot.com/2010/12/prayer-service-of-rabbi-nosson-adlers.html


10

Per the Shach in Yorah Deah Siman 369:2 and the Taz in 369:4 since in current times there is no Tahara in Eretz Yisroel therefore there is no additional prohibition for a Kohain to leave Eretz Yisroel over a non Kohain.


10

There has never been an official Chief Rabbi of the United States. Jonathon D. Sarna (in his American Judaism: A History. Yale University Press, 2004, page 105) explains this phenomenon thus: But since there was no parallel Christian religious authority—no chief Protestant minister, no archbishop, not even a Catholic cardinal with nationwide ...


9

You are right as to the reason why we don't have two days of Yom Kippur is because it is dangerous and we don't decree on people decrees that they can't handle. As to the other two, see 9 Days of Chanukah?


9

My father, who grew up orthodox in Brooklyn during the depression era, went to public school for High School. He told me that although there were a few Yeshivas, and most of the children went to Public School in that period. He had a Hebrew tutor in the afternoon, yet he told me that many did not. Although there were some Yeshivos (Chaim Berlin, Torah ...


8

Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 527:22) says that you should make the following declaration when making an Eruv on the first day of Yom Tov: "If today is a Yom Tov, then I don't need an Eruv [because tomorrow is really a weekday, and I can prepare for Shabbos as usual]. But if today is a weekday, then with this Eruv I shall be allowed to bake, cook, ...." Note ...


8

The guru of such American Jewish history questions is Jonathan Sarna: http://www.amazon.com/Jews-Civil-War-Adam-Mendelsohn/dp/081474091X/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1280928618&sr=8-8 http://www.amazon.com/American-Jewish-Experience-Jonathan-Sarna/dp/0841913765/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1280928691&sr=1-1 ...


8

Those who hold it is forbidden in the Diaspora: Rif, Rosh, Rambam, Rav Avraham Ben HaRambam, Semag, Semak, Ittur, Mordechai, Raavyah, Haghot Maymoniot, Ritva, Eshkol, Kolbo, Tashbetz, Sefer HaChinuch, Or Zarua, Rabbeinu Yerucham, Meiri, Terumat HaDeshen, Piskei Tosfot, Haghot Ashiri, Tur, Bach, Beit Yosef, Rama. Those who hold it is permitted in the ...


8

Now that we've moved the clocks, I realized that it's possible to do the inverse of @jake's answer from the eastern time zone: shabbat ended this week before 6PM, so if I'd thought of it I could have gotten credit for the day by visiting in that last hour (7PM EST = midnight UTC). Shabbat won't end after 7PM again until March 10, and there are no chagim in ...


8

I think the main issue is not how close/far they were from one another, but who was in charge. By and large, Sepharadim were under Muslim rule, which allowed them freedoms that were not given to Ashkenazim by their Christian overlords. It was more of an Iron Curtain barrier than a distance barrier. One might also note the consistency with which Sepharadim ...


8

Because in theory you could have said Shehecheyanu when you prepared (bound) your lulav before Sukkos. So even supposing that the second day of Sukkos was the real Yom Tov (and the previous day was actually erev Sukkos), your Shehecheyanu then would still count as the real thing. (By contrast, with kiddush, you're saying the berachah because of the holiday ...


8

“Taharas HaKohanim Kehilchoso” 12 (2) (recently published by Moshe Gross, Beit Shemesh) mentions that there is a machlokes about the rabbinic issur of kohanim to be metamei themselves in “Eretz HoAmim”. He quotes a number of sources including many Acharonim that are lenient (including those quoted in the first answer). He then quotes sources that forbid a ...


8

The reason we have double parshiyos in the first place is in order to satisfy the four basic rules (given in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 428:4) about the distribution of parshiyos throughout the year. In particular, the first two are: that the Shabbos before Pesach has to be Parshas Tzav in a regular year, or Metzora in a leap year; and that the Shabbos ...


8

The one high school Yeshiva in North America for the deaf is Yeshivas Nefesh Dovid (http://www.nefeshdovid.com/) located in Toronto. The Rosh Yeshiva, Rabbi Chaim Tzvi Kakon, himself is deaf and got his S'micha from Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore, MD.


7

Good question. The same question comes up with all the blessings regarding a second-day yom tov on the Diaspora; e.g. kiddush and shehechiyanu on the second night of Sukkot, Shavuot, and Shmini Atzeret. Until the Jewish calendar was fixed in place (around the year 500 or so), those in the Diaspora were keeping two days, going "maybe yom tov is really ...


7

Well it's technically possible to write a script (and I'm sure there have been scripts written already), but an important thing to note is that the homepage doesn't count for a visit, as well as "similar pages" (source). [and there may even be more secret algorithms preventing something like that] Of course, we would then have to analyze whether this would ...


7

Sitting in the sukkah can be considered a "passive" action, for without saying a berakhah (ברכה) all we're doing is simply sitting and eating outside. However, shaking the Lulav is an "active" or "positive" action which is very specific to Sukkot, and as such, it is not done for the same reasons we don't say a berakhah when sitting in the sukkah on Shmini ...


7

Rabbi David Zvi Hoffmann, in Melamed le-Ho'il 42, was asked: At this time, in all places where Jews reside, [at the command] of the king and state every able bodied man has to enter the military and serve for one, two, or three years, and he will be compelled there to violate Shabbatot and Yamim Tovim. Is a Jew who fears God's word and observes all the ...


7

I once heard a rabbi speak about this (but, sadly, I don't remember who), and he talked about contrasting Halloween with Purim. Both involve dressing up in costumes and socializing -- but on Purim we go around and give gifts, while Halloween is about taking. He made this a teaching moment with his kids about mussar (right behavior), and tied it in with the ...


6

As per this article (http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/93594/jewish/Shavuos.htm) Why then was Shavuos observed for two days? In order not to make a distinction between one festival and another.19 Were the second day of this festival not to be observed in the diaspora, the Jews living there might have treated the observance of the second day ...


6

Aside from the reasons that Shalom mentioned, the Midrash (Shir Hashirim Rabbah 1:6) states that it's part of the penalty of exile: since we didn't properly keep the one day of Yom Tov in the Land of Israel, we now have to keep two in exile. (In a more positive vein, though, Chassidic writings see this as part of the process of teshuvah - like a rope that ...



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