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1

It's an excellent question Sarah and one that requires careful consideration and thoughtful reflection. First, please bear in mind that the subjects mentioned in the 'answer' you found are borrowing heavily from the Prophets, midrashic and kabbalistic sources. So many of the ideas presented are to be understood allegorically, meaning interpretively, ...


6

You cannot really appreciate Jewish theology in a meaningful way from answers on the Internet. This requires years of study, and knowledge of context. For example, the first quote, which was the opinion of Rabbi Ami (and derived from an interpretation of a verse), is refuted and rejected by the gemara, which concludes (Shabbat 25b): וש"מ יש מיתה בלא חטא ...


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The difference is that in Christian theology the cohabitation itself is repugnant whereas in Jewish theology the cohabitation is a holy mitzva which may or may not be accompanied by imperfect intentions. Interestingly this relates to Rashi in this week's parshah who says Bilam was possibly blinded for criticising God for waiting for the drop of semen that ...


1

I can see how Christian books could be useful; however, there are so many Christian books out there; Christian books may just be too broad. You might still find yourself having to explain and search for more specific adjectives. Here are some additional suggestions: The 27 Books Primary Apostolic Writings Primary Christian Writings Reading ...


5

Thank you for your sensitivity. The issue with "old" and "new" isn't just what you said about "old and outdated, new and shiny". It's also that, to us, the latter isn't a "testament" at all. God made a covenant with Israel at Sinai and God does not break His word, so to say that He set aside that covenant to make a new, contradictory one is problematic. ...


1

Can a Kohen converted to Christianity or married with a non-Jewish woman recite the Birkat Kohanim after Teshuva? This answer is referenced, but an explicative part is based on personal reflection, which may be questionable. Yes! It is allowed. But I want to show two sides. At a first glance this question seems strange, why not? The source of the problem ...


0

An Orthodox seminary will not accept a candidate who is currently married to a non-Jew. (Nor would I expect any rabbi to convey personal semicha to such an individual.) If she has converted, or the applicant is no longer married to a non-Jew, then the seminary would consider the particulars of the applicant's situation.


-1

I asked Rav Dovid Bleich years ago about going into a church and he told me that there was no problem as long as it wasn't during a service. I used that response just this week when I went on a tour of old Bronx shuls in the Grand Concourse area.


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One thing to note: One shouldn't use the church as a meetup location, like: "Meet me outside the church on Ploni Street at 4PM to collect items from the PokeStop." (Source: Passuk: "V'Shem Elohim Acharim Lo Yishama Al Picha, Shmos 23:13." Also, it's a Gemara+Shulchan Aruch, as well as a Psak that I heard, which applies it to mekomos Avodah Zarah as well as ...


6

We've had related questions from prospective converts and one that asks specifically how to behave in a particular group's shul. This answer will overlap with answers there, but I'm going to focus specifically on the "Christian visitor" aspect of your question, because even though prospective converts can visit, you might not automatically generalize that ...


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Reform or reconstructionist synagogues should be ok. Conservative I believe too. As far as orthodox synagogues go, I dont think it is a good idea.



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