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22

Short answer: NO. Long answer: also NO. Here's why: Rabbi Yosef Karo writes (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 328:2): מִי שֶׁיֵּשׁ לוֹ חֹלִי שֶׁל סַכָּנָה, מִצְוָה לְחַלֵּל עָלָיו אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת; וְהַזָּרִיז, הֲרֵי זֶה מְשֻׁבָּח; וְהַשּׁוֹאֵל, הֲרֵי זֶה שׁוֹפֵךְ דָּמִים Someone who has a life-threatening illness is commanded (מצוה) to violate ...


11

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ruled that one may violate שבת for the injection of morphine. See שמירת שבת כהלכתה, chapter 32, footnote 150, where Rabbi YY Neuwirth writes that he heard from Rav Shlomo Zalman that since זריקת מורפיום (morphine injection) does not have any healing properties, and it's just for the relief of pain, it should be forbidden; however, ...


9

Sounds like you are referring to this מדרש רבה במדבר פרשה ג פסקה א "ר תנחומא מעשה בתמרה אחת שהיתה עומדת בחמתן ולא היתה עושה פירות והיו מרכיבין אותה ולא עשתה פירות אמר להם דקלי תמרה היא רואה מיריחו והיא מתאוה לה בלבה והביאו ממנה והרכיבו אותה מיד עשתה פירות כך כל תאותן וצפויין של צדיקים הקב"ה the gist is that there was a tree which would not produce ...


7

To answer the questions, in order: שמירת שבת כהלכתה (Rabbi YY Neuwirth) in 32:13 writes that if someone has a "מחלה מידבקת," an infectious disease, and there is a concern that he will infect those around him (and besides for the hospital, he cannot otherwise be kept in a מקום מבודד, a quarantine), he may be driven by car to the hospital on Shabbos, out of ...


6

Since this is a how-to question, I will answer it with practical advice. Questions about the particular halachos mentioned in passing may be asked separately. Here's what I've been told to do, with illustrative pictures. Before changing anything about what you do personally, you should talk to both your rabbi and your doctor. What is written here is just ...


6

The Pirkei D'Reb Eliezer 52(starting from the words Mofes Arba) writes that from creation until Yaakov people would go out to the shuk and they would sneeze and then die without sickness beforehand.


5

The Bavli (Bava Kamma 60b) states that when a plague is in the city one should stay inside and when a famine is in the city one should leave. However, it is worth noting the words of the Arukh HaShulchan (576:12): כתבו הגדולים דכשאבעבועות שקורין פקי"ן פורחים בתינוקות ומתים – יש לגזור תענית. וכל אחד מחוייב להרחיק מן העיר בניו ובנותיו הקטנים, ואם לא עשה כן ...


5

Got this partial answer from Rabbi David Wolpe: "I have always heard that while there is no limit to personal prayers, a mi sheberach should be for four weeks unless requested longer. But I know of many that have gone longer, so there probably isn’t a prohibition." This at least answers the question about the upper bound and highlights some distinction ...


4

The story is from Avot deRabi Natan. Rabbi Shimon ben Yochai visited someone who was in severe pain and cursed out God because of it. The conclusion of the story is that the best thing for the visitor to do is be a good listener, not show up to lecture the sufferer about faith. So if I see someone now cursing out God because of the pain, it's not my place ...


4

The Chazon Ish (Emunah UBitachon) and others hold that one can always daven for a sick person, no mater how serious his condition is and no matter how slim his chance of recovery is. The only exception would be a real miracle (not to be confused with a "medical miracle"). For example, one may not daven for someone whose arm was amputated that the arm grow ...


3

If you don't know his mother's name, you can use his father's name (Aruch Hashulchan 119:1, Orchos Rabeinu Vol 1, p 64). If you don't know his mother or father's name, you can use the surname (family name) (R' Chaim Kanievsky in Ishei Yisrael p734). If you don't know the person's proper Hebrew name, you can use an English name or a nickname that resembles ...


3

Until Yaakov there was no sickness, once Yaakov came he begged for mercy and there was sickness. Bava Metzia 87a


3

There is a very extensive discussion of this question (or at least a similar enough question) involving a consider amount of back and forth, in the teshuvos of the Nachalas Shiva (a student of the Taz). His conclusion is quoted by the Shaarei Teshuvah (288:3) עיין בשו"ת נחלת שבעה סי' ל"ט שעשה מעשה לברך החולה בשבת בבה"כ אע"פ שהחולה לא היה שם בעיר רק בישוב ...


3

Sheilas Yaavetz 64 - column starting ונ"ל טעם discussing praying for a sick person on Shabbos, says that one should only pray for a ill person, who's illness has taken a turn for the worse לכן אין לבקש על החולה אם לא תקף עליו חליו His basis is Tircha D'Tzibura, which as you see we do not Daven 18 Brachos in Shemona Esrei on Shabbos. אלא משום טורח ...


3

I asked a member of the Greater Washington [DC] Chevra Kadisha about this, and she told me that when they receive a deceased person who had an infectious disease, they can be directed to do a procedure called a "lay-over." In this case, they do not wash or dress the body or otherwise come in contact with it. Instead, they say the appropriate prayers and ...


2

This is a community wiki answer, which means that anyone with 100 reputation points or more can edit without review. Please feel free to add your own sources, keeping the structure I've set up. Also, please leave a comment regarding your addition, so that it's clear who said what :) Gemara Yoma 85a-b (which verse teaches that we violate שבת to save a ...


2

The Halichos Shlomo on tephila has a long footnote with relevant points. It's found in chapter 8 on siff 15 footnote #56. I'll quote a few points. The discussion starts by saying if one ended the bracha of rifaeinu by saying rofei chol bassar by mistake, they have not fulfilled the obligation of that bracha. The reason given is that rophei chol bassar is ...


2

I don't think so. I was studying in Israel when I found myself in that situation and asked one of the rabbis (don't remember which) then present at the Shalom Hartman Institute, who advised me to pray my own words from my heart. (I did, and made it home in time without adding to my pet's suffering.) I modeled what I said loosely on the various conclusions ...


2

Not that I'm aware of. But Jewish law traditionally has a high value on concern for animals' pain. So perhaps something like: Almighty God, Whose mercy is on all His creatures; You commanded us not to stand idly by when a donkey is suffering from a crushing burden, and thus it's heartbreaking for us to see our pet suffer like this. We beseech You to ease ...


2

I have often wondered about this myself. As far as I can tell, there are no rules about how long you say a mi-shebeirakh for a person or include an ill person in your private Amidah, except, of course, if the person gets well or dies, in which case the prayer no longer makes sense. I like the distinction suggested above -- that mi shebeirakh is a communal ...


1

The Gemara is not saying that the Korban is to atone for the words spoken during childbirth. It is to atone for reneging on what was sworn then. The concept of ignoring what was said during a time of distress is that complaints which would otherwise be inappropriate can be understood as coming from pain. This wasn't meant to apply to promises and swearing. A ...


1

The choices you bring are not the one's mentioned in Halacha. Here's an overview of what the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch brings: Teshuva & Prayer See סימן קכז - הלכות תענית יחיד in the Kitzur: כְּשֵׁם שֶׁמִּצְוָה עַל הַצִּבּוּר לְהִתְעַנּוֹת וּלְהִתְפַּלֵּל עַל כָּל צָרָה שֶׁלֹּא תָבוֹא, כָּךְ מִצְוָה עַל כָּל יָחִיד שֶׁאִם בָּאָה עָלָיו חַס וְשָׁלוֹם ...


1

From torah.org: Rambam rules (as is the ruling of the Gemara; see below) that both "audible" and "careful" reading of K'riat Sh'ma are desiderata L'khat'hilah but are not indispensable. The Mishnah in Berakhot (2:3) cites the following two disputes: "If someone read K'riat Sh'ma and did not hear his own reading, (R. Yehuda says:*) Yatza, R. ...


1

In my shul in Montreal, the list of names of the sick is growing all the time. It seems to me that we should do the mi shehbayrach for those who are sick today or very recent, and those who are having an operation. However, those who are chronically sick, should be reduced to perhaps once a week. This is one solution. Another solution would be to divide ...


1

I think you are translating it wrong, hence the confusion. שבת היא מלזעוק ורפואה קרובה לבא means: On Shabbat one is forbidden from crying out [as in praying], (yet, your) healing is (surely) about to happen soon. Essentially, instead of a direct prayer as in the classic רפואה שלמה - [Hashem grant you ] a full recovery, you are blessing them with a רפואה ...



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