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The story is from Avot deRabi Natan. Rabbi Shimon ben Yochai visited someone who was in severe pain and cursed out God because of it. The conclusion of the story is that the best thing for the visitor to do is be a good listener, not show up to lecture the sufferer about faith. So if I see someone now cursing out God because of the pain, it's not my place ...


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Likely, the reference is to the story in I Samuel 5-6 where the Philistines captured the Ark of the Covenant in battle, and were stricken with hemorrhoids and rats whilst they held on to it. After 7 months, they returned the Ark to the Jews along with an offering of 5 Golden Hemorrhoids and 5 Golden Rats from the 5 Philistine cities. It's not unusual for ...


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From the Star-K Website: Although it is preferable to visit someone in person, if one is unable to do so or if the patient prefers, one may fulfill the mitzvah of bikur cholim by telephoning (or emailing) the patient The footnote is a bit off (the number is 39, but the link codes it to #38) but the source is one of these 2: Gesher Hachaim pg 212. ...


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I am unaware that there is any prescribed order to this. Most places I have attended do the following order: 1 - Announce the names of those who are ill and that Tehillim will be recited for them. I am assuming that you are talking about a small (1-3 people, avg.) group of people, though, there is no strict protocol. Also, I have usually seen this ...


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The Gemara is not saying that the Korban is to atone for the words spoken during childbirth. It is to atone for reneging on what was sworn then. The concept of ignoring what was said during a time of distress is that complaints which would otherwise be inappropriate can be understood as coming from pain. This wasn't meant to apply to promises and swearing. A ...



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