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17

Short answer: NO. Long answer: also NO. Here's why: Rabbi Yosef Karo writes (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 328:2): מִי שֶׁיֵּשׁ לוֹ חֹלִי שֶׁל סַכָּנָה, מִצְוָה לְחַלֵּל עָלָיו אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת; וְהַזָּרִיז, הֲרֵי זֶה מְשֻׁבָּח; וְהַשּׁוֹאֵל, הֲרֵי זֶה שׁוֹפֵךְ דָּמִים Someone who has a life-threatening illness is commanded (מצוה) to violate ...


15

The Zohar (Bereishis 84a, citing Psalms 86:16, "והושיעה לבן אמתך") says that it's better to pray using the most definite facts available. There can be a slight chance that the sick person isn't really the son of the man who is assumed to be his father (even though, for halachic purposes, we ignore this possibility and follow the majority - Chullin 11b), but ...


13

The Shulchan Aruch discusses this issue (Even HaEzer 76). In Seif 3, he comments regarding the standard onot as fixed by profession: בד"א, במי שגופו בריא ויכול לקיים העונה הקצובה לו, אבל מי שאינו בריא אינו חייב אלא לפי מה שאומדין אותו שיכול לקיים. ‏ In what situation do [the above times] apply? For someone who's body is healthy and is able to ...


11

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ruled that one may violate שבת for the injection of morphine. See שמירת שבת כהלכתה, chapter 32, footnote 150, where Rabbi YY Neuwirth writes that he heard from Rav Shlomo Zalman that since זריקת מורפיום (morphine injection) does not have any healing properties, and it's just for the relief of pain, it should be forbidden; however, ...


10

This article from Dr J Menczer indicates that although there is a significantly lower incidence of cervical cancer amongst Jews it is not due to family purity laws, as even Jews who do not observe these laws have a lower incidence of cervical cancer.


10

If one has a flea on his skin and is biting him, he may remove it, but should not kill it. There is no violation of the melacha of tzad because these items are not generally hunted and are prohibited only Rabbinically, which is waived since there is pain. (Mishne Berurah 316:36,37) A tick bite in addition to the above heter also involves potential personal ...


10

Sounds like you are referring to this מדרש רבה במדבר פרשה ג פסקה א "ר תנחומא מעשה בתמרה אחת שהיתה עומדת בחמתן ולא היתה עושה פירות והיו מרכיבין אותה ולא עשתה פירות אמר להם דקלי תמרה היא רואה מיריחו והיא מתאוה לה בלבה והביאו ממנה והרכיבו אותה מיד עשתה פירות כך כל תאותן וצפויין של צדיקים הקב"ה the gist is that there was a tree which would not produce ...


8

On the verse in Devarim 32:4 הַצּוּר תָּמִים פָּעֳלוֹ, כִּי כָל-דְּרָכָיו מִשְׁפָּט: אֵל אֱמוּנָה וְאֵין עָוֶל, צַדִּיק וְיָשָׁר הוּא, I have heard (do not remember the source) that Hashem is different than a regular ruler. For example - a regular ruler when he punishes a person and puts him in jail for a crime, his wife and children suffer even though they ...


8

From Dinonline.org: The Question: If someone is lo aleinu sick and adds a name to his existing name does he have to have written a new Kasubah? Answer: The Iggros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat 2:70:2) writes that if a person is not called by his new name, one does not write a new kesubah after a name was added due to illness. This is also the ...


7

I am going off of the Shulhan Arukh HaRav on this one. Not my normal source for halakhic information, but considering we are talking about a case of in extremis there is what to be lenient. The relevant portion is O"H Simian 43. Obviously one should do everything possible to keep from entering into a toilet with tefilin on, however that is not in the case ...


7

See Har Tz'vi (OC 1:163) where he discusses this issue. He first quotes the Panim M'iros (2:27), Chasam Sofer (OC 127), and the Minchas Chinuch (313), who hold that hana'as mei'av is a necessary criterion for birkas hamazon. Therefore, these opinions hold, if someone ate half of a k'zayis, then vomited it up, then ate another half k'zayis, he would be exempt ...


7

To answer the questions, in order: שמירת שבת כהלכתה (Rabbi YY Neuwirth) in 32:13 writes that if someone has a "מחלה מידבקת," an infectious disease, and there is a concern that he will infect those around him (and besides for the hospital, he cannot otherwise be kept in a מקום מבודד, a quarantine), he may be driven by car to the hospital on Shabbos, out of ...


6

"Rama, Orach Chaim 656:1, rules that one must spend up to one-fifth of his assets on order to fulfill a positive mitzvah and his entire fortune in order not to violate a negative commandment." (source) As for negative commandments that are violated by passivity--such as the commandment that you may not allow someone else to die--there is dispute about ...


6

Sefer Chasidim siman 800: אדם שמתפלל על אביו אם הוא חולה לא יאמר תרפא אבא מארי או לאדוני אבא רפא One who is praying for his sick father should not say "Heal my father my master" or "To my master my father heal" See continuation there, where he brings Elisha not referring to Eliyahu as his master as an example - not just father/son. Birkei Yosef ...


6

The Pirkei D'Reb Eliezer 52(starting from the words Mofes Arba) writes that from creation until Yaakov people would go out to the shuk and they would sneeze and then die without sickness beforehand.


5

The following story is from Rabbi Paysach Krohn, Echoes of the Maggid. It is one of my favorites. I believe that those that are imperfect are here in order for us to perfect ourselves. A young boy, Shaya, attends a special school during the week, Chush, for learning-disabled children. He loves baseball, but because of his lack of coordination isn't ...


5

The first section in Nishmas Avraham on Even Haezer reads (in my own translation): Rabbi S.Z. Auerbach zatzal wrote me: I'm uncertain about someone with an hereditary disease whose descendants will be in pain all their days, or who suffers a blood-clotting disorder that passes to sons (hemophilia), whether he may therefore refrain from ...


5

Personally, I don't convert the name to Hebrew. It's not their name. There are plenty of Jews whose Hebrew name is nothing like their English name (e.g., my father is Joel/Yitzchak Isaac). If someone converted his name to Hebrew it would be wrong. If they kept it English, they'd be right. Jack's a good example since it can be Jacob, John, or ...


5

One who has a bandage on his hand which is not easily removable should wash as much of his hand as possible (even if that amount zero) and take care that any skin which could not be washed not directly touch the bread. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 162:10, Magen Avraham sk 18, Mishna Brurah sk 68 and particularly 69 It would seem that the appropriate blessing ...


5

A few years ago there was a tehilim drive for a sick baby pre-bris and the tehilim name being used was Tinok Ben Aviva until they were eventually able to do a bris. The child's father is an established Rabbi , currently leading this congregation and many congregations used this name worldwide, so I assume this is the accepted practice. Not sure how to handle ...


5

Indeed, that is how the minhag began. The practice of changing one's name to an entirely new and unrelated name is attested in many places relevant to gitin because of the precision in names necessary there. (citation needed) Incidentally, it seems that the minhag was drawing upon the auspiciousness of the name changing and not the meaning of the new name, ...


5

None of G-d's creations exist for no reason. As Rabbi Akiva's teacher, Rabbi Nachum Ish Gam Zu, taught him, gam zu l'tovah -- everything is for the (Divine) Good. What that is, we don't always know. When trouble happens to us, individually, it may be a message from G-d. Talmud Bavli Berachot 5a tells us that when hard times falls on us, individually, we ...


5

Rashi in Pesachim 56a writes that Sefer HaRefuos was hidden because their hearts were not humbled over their illness but were, rather, healed immediately. Rambam in Peirush Hamishna (Pesachim 4:10) rejects this approach arguing that just as one may not hold back food from the hungry, so too one may not withhold healing from the ill. Instead, Rambam writes ...


5

The Bavli (Bava Kamma 60b) states that when a plague is in the city one should stay inside and when a famine is in the city one should leave. However, it is worth noting the words of the Arukh HaShulchan (576:12): כתבו הגדולים דכשאבעבועות שקורין פקי"ן פורחים בתינוקות ומתים – יש לגזור תענית. וכל אחד מחוייב להרחיק מן העיר בניו ובנותיו הקטנים, ואם לא עשה כן ...


5

Since this is a how-to question, I will answer it with practical advice. Questions about the particular halachos mentioned in passing may be asked separately. Here's what I've been told to do, with illustrative pictures. Before changing anything about what you do personally, you should talk to both your rabbi and your doctor. What is written here is just ...


4

The Ben Yehoyda(Brachos 55b Anna) answers the person needs merits, and since men have a harder time because the have Bittul Torah and other sins more specific to men, their Zchus is better. The Birchei Yosef(Orach Chaim 284) uses this to answer why when somone has a father Yahrtzeit and the other has a mother the father has precedence he says basicly the ...


4

Invoking the name of the mother is better for inducing mercy from above. Will bl"n get the source for you later.


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1228223/jewish/Psalms-and-Jewish-Prayer-for-Healing.htm When praying for an individual who is ill, it is customary to recite the following thirty-six chapters of Psalms: 20, 6, 9, 13, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, 37, 38, 39, 41, 49, 55, 56, 69, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 102, 103, 104, 107, 116, ...


4

In Sefer Nishmat Avraham- Orach Chaim Siman 123 The Pardes Yosef offers a number of reasons why it is unnecessary to change the text of a prayer on his behalf. First: It is known that one's soul is considered to have "limbs" corresponding to the physical limbs of the body and, although he has lost one of his physical limbs, all of his spiritual "limbs" are ...


4

By a lady - who has 252 limbs (Bechoros 45.) א"ר יהודה אמר שמואל מעשה בתלמידיו של ר' ישמעאל ששלקו זונה אחת שנתחייבה שריפה למלך בדקו ומצאו בה מאתים וחמשים ושנים אמר להם שמא באשה בדקתם שהוסיף לה הכתוב שני צירים ושני דלתות - we say L'Chol Aivoreho, U'Lchol Gideha - so I would think (no source yet) that if a man is either missing a limb or has extra that we ...



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