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9

My father, who grew up orthodox in Brooklyn during the depression era, went to public school for High School. He told me that although there were a few Yeshivas, and most of the children went to Public School in that period. He had a Hebrew tutor in the afternoon, yet he told me that many did not. Although there were some Yeshivos (Chaim Berlin, Torah ...


7

I once heard a rabbi speak about this (but, sadly, I don't remember who), and he talked about contrasting Halloween with Purim. Both involve dressing up in costumes and socializing -- but on Purim we go around and give gifts, while Halloween is about taking. He made this a teaching moment with his kids about mussar (right behavior), and tied it in with the ...


6

My preferred method - tried when teaching both my sons their Bar Mitzva Parsha - is as follows. When the child makes an error, make them go back 2 - 3 words and restart correctly from there. This will help them correct the flow; otherwise they get used to saying the wrong thing - correcting it (or hearing you correct it) - and continuing. We learn this ...


5

Maybe what you're looking for is a way to communicate the idea in Deut 18:9-15... that the Israelites should be different from the other nations and stay away from magical/idolatrous obsessions or attempts at power that bypass God. In the spiritual realm Jews have only one, very special, relationship. Even so, God would give a better replacement for those ...


4

Is one allowed to study other religions? Mishne Tora, Avoda Zara 2:2 says the study of books on how to worship idols, written by their worshipers, is forbidden. Beyond that I don't know. If not, how is one supposed to know that Judaism is correct? The premise here seems to be that one cannot know Judaism is correct except by eliminating other ...


3

I don't have any documented sources for this, but as my family has been involved in Chinuch for generations, in Lita, the US, and Eretz Yisrael, I do have an oral tradition of how our system evolved. Until the enlightenment, most of gentile Europe was fairly unschooled and ignorant. However, with the enlightenment came this idea that the one people that ...


3

The Alter Rebbe in his Hilchos Talmud Torah (2:1) defines Mishna as Halachic decisions which explain the 613 Mitzvos, their conditions and details, as well as Rabbinic enactments, as statements without their reasons. Talmud (Gemara in that statement - as is clear from the context there and in Chapter 1) on the other hand is the reasons/explanations for the ...


3

So long as you aren't erasing the text, recording content-related notes in a text's margins is a very traditional Jewish practice. Consider this page from a very old Tanakh:


2

See SA YD Siman 245:10, The teacher should not strike him (the student) harshly only lightly. Also see the Mishna (Makkos 8) and the Gemara on it (8b). Also see here and here.


2

do you know of any good, preferably non-disruptive, ways to prevent such skipping while providing the correction or prompt required? Just some ideas: Sit down with your child not during a prayer and explain that such a prompt means that she should repeat the entire word. Explain why. Possibly augmented by: Immediately before the prayer, remind her of ...


2

Basically, we tend to celebrate events where something is happening. (Or a specific event has just happened.) The Talmud described celebrations when semicha was conferred on someone, which has loosely translated into contemporary semicha-granting parties. (Though our semicha today is much more like a graduation.) So I'm not aware of a graduation tradition ...


2

You may be interested in my Sefer which includes the Sugyos Eruvim Daf 14,57,76, Pesachim 109, Succos 7,8. It explains Gemara, Rashi, Tosfos, Marsha, Maharom, Gra, others, and presents every step in equation form and diagrams; it also makes corrections and clarifications on diagrams found in the Shas. It includes an Appendix on Basic Algrebra, 21 definitions ...


2

See Rashi Brachos 5a and Sotah 22a. There, when discussion statements that contrast (maybe not the right word) the terms Mishna and Gemara, Rashi explains that Gemara refers to the explanations of the laws recorded in the Mishna. See also Rashi on Brachos 11a (I'll translate the bold): אף לגמרא צריך לברך. שהוא עיקר התורה שממנו הוראה יוצאה. גמרא היינו ...


2

The Rambam (Avodah Zarah 2:2) prohibits studying from the works of Avodah Zara (and other forms of heresy), and this is codified in the Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah 139). Rav Moshe Feinstein (Yoreh Deah 2:53) says that one is allowed to study religions that no longer exist, as in ancient mythologies, because everyone today knows how foolish they are. I've ...


1

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein instituted a ban on the study of evolution. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_views_on_evolution#Moshe_Feinstein presumably because it could lead people who rely on their limited views astray (like you seem to be) The mishna in Megila ch.4 calls heretics "Chitzonim", which the bartenura defines as those who trust their own ...


1

According to the sefer דורות הראשונים the original mishnah was completed at the latest by the time of the אנשי כנסת הגדולה, a long time before the period of the Tannaim, and remained an oral teaching until Rabbi Yehudah HaNasi and his Beis Din decided that it should be written down. The gemara is explanation of the mishnah which was transmitted orally until ...



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