Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

The Lubavitcher Rebbe says (in a long speech about "Family Planning") that One of the strongest objections is fear of financial inability to support children. Naturally, parents want the best for their children, and fear of being unable to provide adequately is a powerful deterrent to having them. This is a genuine concern -- but based on an assumption ...


9

Basically, we don't have the power to declare someone categorically exempt. Abudraham suggested one explanation, but our system of laws categorically says "all men are obligated", "all women are not." If a person is truly in a situation beyond their control, halacha recognize that. If it's five minutes before sunset and a single dad who hasn't yet prayed ...


8

Human breastmilk is 100% kosher once it has left the woman's body (Shulchan Aruch YD 81:7). Furthermore, it is pareve, but shouldn't be cooked with meat to avoid issues of Marat Ayin (ibid. 87:4).


7

I once heard a rabbi speak about this (but, sadly, I don't remember who), and he talked about contrasting Halloween with Purim. Both involve dressing up in costumes and socializing -- but on Purim we go around and give gifts, while Halloween is about taking. He made this a teaching moment with his kids about mussar (right behavior), and tied it in with the ...


6

If a woman converted before she conceived any children are they considered Jewish? Even with a non-Jewish father? Yes. Children of a Jewish mother are Jewish, regardless. If mom converted she's Jewish. (A child who was in the mother's womb when mom converted is also Jewish, by the way.)


5

Maybe what you're looking for is a way to communicate the idea in Deut 18:9-15... that the Israelites should be different from the other nations and stay away from magical/idolatrous obsessions or attempts at power that bypass God. In the spiritual realm Jews have only one, very special, relationship. Even so, God would give a better replacement for those ...


5

Although perhaps there is a Sefer that discusses this, I am not aware of it. However my father would go in order of age, oldest to youngest, first all the boys and then all the girls. My father in law would do it in order of age, oldest to youngest mixing the boys and girls. So I guess there are at least 2 different ways that people do it.


4

Best interest of child. Rule of thumb (all else being equal) in defining that is: age six and under, with mom. Seven and older: boys with dad, girls with mom. But there are instances where best interests of child will mean all with mom; all with dad; or even neither parent and foster care. (As heard from Rabbi Hershel Schachter on yutorah.org)


4

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 14 discusses Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He says that the source for having Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) is the Gemara Brachos 61a which discusses how Hashem was the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) for Adam Harishon. Then he mentions that the Minhag is that the parents are the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He brings this in the name of Shaalos ...


4

In Biblical times a father could actually agree to marry off his daughter under the age of twelve-and-a-half. (Deuteronomy 22:16). By the times of the Talmud the recommendation had become "she must be grown-up enough to agree to marry the fellow." Yes, a previously-married woman is considered more "on her own" than the first time around. See for instance ...


4

See gemarah Kiddushin 29 which says a father is obligated to circumcise his son, redeem him (if he is a firstborn), teach him Torah, marry him off, teach him a trade, and (according to some) teach him how to swim. See daf 30 for chinuch.


3

Rabbi Noach Orlowek in his book on parenting, My Child My Disciple, says that it is forbidden to let a child cry, because it will affect his Emunah - he will learn that no one answers you when you cry. In a private conversation (which will remain private by leaving out information), the Mashgiach of a well-known Yeshiva, upon hearing this, said "When my son ...


3

There are several issues. When I learned about it, the main issues involve if the child was born Jewish or not. This is from memory and from knowing someone that it affected. If the child was born Jewish and if the biological father was Jewish, then he should be called by the biological father's name. If the child was born Jewish and the biological father ...


2

A child born to a Jewish mother is Jewish,1 and one born to a non-Jewish mother is not. This is determined at the time of birth, which is why infant conversions are sometimes done when a woman is in the process of conversion. Changes in the mother's status after the child is born are not relevant. One source for this is Kiddushin 66b (in the mishna at the ...


2

Basically, we tend to celebrate events where something is happening. (Or a specific event has just happened.) The Talmud described celebrations when semicha was conferred on someone, which has loosely translated into contemporary semicha-granting parties. (Though our semicha today is much more like a graduation.) So I'm not aware of a graduation tradition ...


2

We're discussing making an eruv techum. That type says "my home vis-a-vis where I can walk on shabbos isn't here, it's some place east of here where I dropped off some matza." That gives you plenty of walking space to the east, but then limits your walking distance to the west more so than had you made no eruv. As making such an eruv limits you in some ways, ...


2

R. Ya'akov Emden (מור וקציעה או"ח ס' שכח) suggests that one can only force someone to take medication when there is no counterclaim from the patient or another physician. However, if the patient or the physician feel that the medication, will not work, we can't force him. Furthermore, if he claims that he doesn't want to take the medication because it ...


2

To kind of restate @Gershon Gold's answer in the spirit of the question, the biblical source for the idea of escorting the Bride was G-d's escorting Eve to Adam. Genesis 2:22 states: וַיְבִאֶהָ אֶל הָאָדָם -- and He brought her to the man.


2

http://www.shtaygen.co.il/?CategoryID=817&ArticleID=7936 InParshas Lech Lecha - Braishis 15:15 it says that when Avraham will pass away ואתה תבוא אל אבותיך בשלום. Rashi explains that even though Terach was an idol worshipper it says come to your parent, since Terach repented prior to his death. The Marhasha was asked the following question when he was ...


1

Dr. Bentzion Sorotzkin (in several articles and lectures, you can find them at www.drsorotzkin.com and this lecture specifically mentions the point http://www.drsorotzkin.com/audio/EnhancingChildrensResistance.mp3 (aside from being a lecture every Jewish parent should hear)) makes the point that if it were correct that lack of insulation was a significant ...


1

Are w talking about married asexuals, or unmarried? Lemaise, we haven't been concerned about making unmarried people fulfill prvi irvi since, when, centuries at least? The Remu says that we don't. Married aces, OK. (And yes, there are plenty of them, some of them married to other aces, and some married to sexuals.) If the woman is ace, it should be entirely ...


1

Obviously, such a person should have a discussion with a mental health professional just to make sure they understand what's going on and how to cope with everything in their life. Similarly, when seriously dating s/he should make clear to a prospective spouse what to expect in this relationship. People can work out all sorts of things. (Maybe he can find a ...


1

Unfortunately, this issue isn't treated with as much thoroughness as it should be in halakha. However, there is the concept that an abusive parent is violating lo titen miqshol lifnei iver and thus baiting the child into violence. I know, and I apologize that I can't find the source, that the Tur argues with Rambam about whether or not a child is still ...


1

No halachic bearing whatsoever. A born-out-of-wedlock child inherits from his father just the same, and if firstborn male, would get a double portion. "Pegam" means that people will say mean things about such a child. We try to avoid social problems too, even if they aren't halachic ones per se.


1

There is an extent to which a parent-owned object assigned to the use of a specific child is his, we give our children (and guests) Matzo on Pesach night which must belong to you see SA Horav OC Siman 454:9 and here then here in Mishnah Berurah 454:15 -even if they don't make a Kinyan (let's say we put it in their mouth)- they fulfilled their obligation. ...


1

While I've never seen this discussed in any of the literature, I would imagine that the child does have an obligation to honour and respect his/her father (assuming that the father has done teshuva), and that the father has the right to annul his daughter's vows and betroth her to a man, etc. My "proof" text (if it can be termed a proof) is the Mishna, ...


1

The Rambam writes (Geneiva 9:5 (English)): הגונב את בנו או את אחיו הקטן, וכן האפטרופין שגנבו את היתומים שהן סמוכין אצלם, ובעל הבית שגנב אחד מבני ביתו הסמוכין על שולחנו, ומלמד תינוקות שגנב אחד מן הקטנים הלומדים אצלו--אף על פי שנשתמש בו ומכרו, פטור: שנאמר "ונמצא בידו" (שמות כא,טז), פרט לאלו שהן מצויין בידו.‏ The following individuals are not liable ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible