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25

According to R' Dr. David Shabtai, in a 2013 Times of Israel blog post, there is no such source: The religious exemption exists to protect people whose religion forbids vaccination, to allow religious practice without governmental intervention. The basis for this exemption is to protect people whose religion prohibits vaccinations. This is not true ...


11

He is reciting Numbers 6:24-26 (he only gets through half of the last verse in that clip): The LORD bless thee, and keep thee; The LORD make His face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee; The LORD lift up His countenance upon thee, and give thee peace. This is known as the Priestly Blessing and it is sometimes used when parents bless ...


11

Human breastmilk is 100% kosher once it has left the woman's body (Shulchan Aruch YD 81:7). Furthermore, it is pareve, but shouldn't be cooked with meat to avoid issues of Marat Ayin (ibid. 87:4).


9

Gitin 57b says that the grandchildren of Sisra taught children in Yerushalayim. Rabbi Tzadok HaCohen in Poked Ikrim - Os 5 - page 36 - line 3 - second columm says that this Gemara, according to the teachings of הרמ"ע is talking about grandchildren that came from the relations Yael had with Sisra. I do not know whether she had a son or daughter nor whether ...


8

"What is the best way to explain the concept of tzniut to a very young (say first grade) girl without explaining sexuality?" The same way you would explain the concept to anybody else: without explaining sexuality. To quote the esteemed R' Alex: This would have to begin with Micah 6:8: והצנע לכת עם א-להיך, "be tzanua in walking with your G-d" (this is ...


6

Actually Halacha forbids a hard Rod. The discussion in Hilchos Talmud Torah is a "retzua daka" - a thin strap - and nothing more, and if it doesn't work the first time, you don't try again.


6

The commandment of kibbud av v'eim does not apply to adoptive parents (Sotah 49a - right before the Mishna). However, there is a moral obligation of hakarat hatov (gratitude) which requires that the child honor his/her adoptive parents. (Source. The article states that "one must honor his/her adoptive parents as much as if they were the biological parents." ...


6

Once a man has a male and female child who themselves are able to procreate, he had fulfilled his obligation. See Shulchan Aruch, Even Ha'ezer 1:5. Fulfilling ones obligation with two boys was the opinion of Beis Shamai which we do not rule with. The Yerushalmi in Yevamos mentions an opinion that Beis Hillel also ruled that bidieved one has fulfilled his ...


5

The Tur indicates that a number of these apply to the woman (EH 25): Nidah - The woman would at least share responsibility. Shichrus - This applies if either spouse is intoxicated. Chatzufa - This applies specifically to a woman who verbally propositions her husband in an explicit manner. The Aruch HaShulchan (EH 25:9) mentions that m'riva refers to ...


5

The current answers don't address the question in detail. So here goes: What is the source and reason for this? The source is the Mishna in Yevamos 64a and the subsequent discussion in the Talmud there. The reason is that the man is commanded to have children, and after 10 years with no pregnancy, he needs to do something else to fulfill the Mitzvah. It ...


5

The Rivevos Ephraim 6:410:1 brings the psak of Rav Eliyashiv that one may hold a child during bentching. In Chelek 8:572:1 he was asked to explain the psak of Rav Elyashiv how its ok since there are achronim who hold by pisukei dizimrah one cannot hold anything so certainly by a doraisa one would have to avoid such a thing. Rav Ephraim Greenblatt(Rivevos ...


5

Kitzur Shlchan Aruch The Kitzur Shlchan Aruch in סימן פב - אסור העברה והוצאה מרשות לרשות explicitly forbids it. It's irrelevant if the child can already walk or not. סעיף י': הָאִשָּׁה מְדַדָּה אֶת בְּנָהּ אֲפִלּוּ בִּרְשׁוּת הָרַבִּים, וּבִלְבַד שֶׁלֹּא תִּגְרְרֵהוּ, אֶלָּא יְהֵא מַגְבִּיהַּ רַגְלוֹ הָאַחַת וְיַנִּיחַ הַשְּׁנִיָּה עַל הָאָרֶץ ...


5

This is from the Mishna Brurah 98:3 who quotes the Shla Hakodosh: ג) בניו הקטנים - בשל"ה קורא תגר על המביאים ילדים לבהכ"נ והיינו קטנים שעדיין לא הגיעו לחינוך מטעם כי הילדים משחקים ומרקדים בבהכ"נ ומחללים קדושת בהכ"נ וגם מבלבלים דעת המתפללים ועוד גם כי יזקינו לא יסוקו ממנהגם הרע אשר נתחנכו בילדותם להשתגע ולבזות קדושת בהכ"נ אבל כשהגיעו לחינוך אדרבה יביאנו אתו ...


5

First of all, as Double AA commented, לפניו is not exclusively male. In Hebrew, when referring to a group of males and females, the male form is used. That also applies when the reader is of unknown gender. The Chida (author of Birkei Yosef) wrote this several hundred years ago. In that time, it was not common for women or girls to come to shul at all. ...


5

The Kaf HaChaim writes in Yoreh Deah siman 116 number 149 "a woman that begins to nurse her son should begin nursing from the left breast first". He writes that his source is the Tzava'as Rebbe Yehudah HaChasid #69 and the sefer Shmiras HaNefesh #17. The sefer Mishnas Yehoshua footnote #18 (on the linked page) mentions that according to the sefer Shmiras ...


4

I recently read an interview with a daughter of Rav Ovadia Yosef ZT"L and during the interview she mentioned that her father Rav Ovadia always held a grandchild on his lap during bentching.


4

You might want to take him to the store to pick out his very own yarmulke. Now it is his choice and he is doing it because he wants to do it. And every day he wears it he is wearing his yarmulke that he picked out. I have found that it is always best to give children choices when the choices are limited to approved behaviors. Children thus feel empowered ...


4

Various shiurim and tapes have explained that a chalal is treated a a Yisroel and not a Levite. For example Rabbi Kaganoff gives the example of the son of a kohen who had married a divorcee had to perform a Pidyon Haben on his first born child. The shiurim that I have seen explain the reasoning behind this, but I do not have the explicit citations right ...


4

Short answer from Rabbi Shlomo Aviner: Naming a Daughter after a Male Relative Q: I saw that Ha-Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach said that there is absolutely no reason to name a daughter after a male relative (Ve-Alehu Lo Yibul Volume 2, p. 142). And it is written in Shut Tzitz Eliezer (7:49 #13) that a strict person will refrain from doing so. ...


4

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


4

A child born to a Jewish mother is Jewish,1 and one born to a non-Jewish mother is not. This is determined at the time of birth, which is why infant conversions are sometimes done when a woman is in the process of conversion. Changes in the mother's status after the child is born are not relevant. One source for this is Kiddushin 66b (in the mishna at the ...


4

Let's assume you're far down as Cape Town at 33° 55′ 31″ S. Candle lighting on the first day of Chanuka (this year, 5775) at sunset would be at 19:55 and if you wait for night then it's at 20:25. However, one can light as early as Plag HaMincha which will be at 18:25 - that may be the simplest way to get the children involved - light as early as ...


4

How you phrase things will depend on the age of the child, but here are some points you can cover. I'm not a parent, but I've seen parents and teachers offer all of these and remember being told some of them when I was a child. Just because you didn't see something happen doesn't mean Hashem didn't do anything. Most of what Hashem does we don't see ...


4

The Y'fe Soar (commentary to the Midrash Raba 89:6) explains that Pharaoh saw the interpretation of the dream in the dream itself but forgot it. Since this interpretation didn't remind him of the one he'd seen, he knew it was wrong. Y'de Moshe (commentary to the Midrash Raba there) explains that this interpretation didn't fit the dream very well, to ...


4

I got My First Parsha Reader when i was around 5, and has been passed down through the siblings, with everyone getting something out of it. It's geared for children 3-8, but i think that a 2 year old should still be able to appreciate some of the things when you read it to her. It is in English. It contains summaries of each parsha, picking out things that ...


4

We have "Tell me the story of the Parsha." (I got it for much cheaper in a store in Brooklyn) First off, it is laminated! So no kids turning pages or spilling on it will ruin it! But in terms of content, it has a nice synopsis of the main story of the Parsha, incorporating midrashim to a degree, with colorful pictures. It introduces my son to the stories ...


3

Reishis Chachma, Shaar HaKedusha, Chapter 16, Shaar 4 seems to imply that all matters of thought and their effects in this area apply equally to the woman as to the man.


3

Songs have helped me, and the children like to catch on to the words. Also teaching them a little about what we are saying in the tefilla, in a way they will understand.


3

There are several issues. When I learned about it, the main issues involve if the child was born Jewish or not. This is from memory and from knowing someone that it affected. If the child was born Jewish and if the biological father was Jewish, then he should be called by the biological father's name. If the child was born Jewish and the biological father ...


3

According to the Zohar (it is about a fifth of the way through the section read at a Brit Yitzhak, - you can see it here, the line starting with the words אבל תשכח דא כגון בר נש), the child is actually a reincarnation of the deceased brother. The Malbim explains the story of Ovad's birth in this way: Rus 4:16: וַתִּקַּח נָעֳמִי אֶת-הַיֶּלֶד ...



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