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10

Human breastmilk is 100% kosher once it has left the woman's body (Shulchan Aruch YD 81:7). Furthermore, it is pareve, but shouldn't be cooked with meat to avoid issues of Marat Ayin (ibid. 87:4).


9

He is reciting Numbers 6:24-26 (he only gets through half of the last verse in that clip): The LORD bless thee, and keep thee; The LORD make His face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee; The LORD lift up His countenance upon thee, and give thee peace. This is known as the Priestly Blessing and it is sometimes used when parents bless ...


7

I once heard a rabbi speak about this (but, sadly, I don't remember who), and he talked about contrasting Halloween with Purim. Both involve dressing up in costumes and socializing -- but on Purim we go around and give gifts, while Halloween is about taking. He made this a teaching moment with his kids about mussar (right behavior), and tied it in with the ...


5

The commandment of kibbud av v'eim does not apply to adoptive parents (Sotah 49a - right before the Mishna). However, there is a moral obligation of hakarat hatov (gratitude) which requires that the child honor his/her adoptive parents. (Source. The article states that "one must honor his/her adoptive parents as much as if they were the biological parents." ...


5

The Rivevos Ephraim 6:410:1 brings the psak of Rav Eliyashiv that one may hold a child during bentching. In Chelek 8:572:1 he was asked to explain the psak of Rav Elyashiv how its ok since there are achronim who hold by pisukei dizimrah one cannot hold anything so certainly by a doraisa one would have to avoid such a thing. Rav Ephraim Greenblatt(Rivevos ...


5

Maybe what you're looking for is a way to communicate the idea in Deut 18:9-15... that the Israelites should be different from the other nations and stay away from magical/idolatrous obsessions or attempts at power that bypass God. In the spiritual realm Jews have only one, very special, relationship. Even so, God would give a better replacement for those ...


5

Although perhaps there is a Sefer that discusses this, I am not aware of it. However my father would go in order of age, oldest to youngest, first all the boys and then all the girls. My father in law would do it in order of age, oldest to youngest mixing the boys and girls. So I guess there are at least 2 different ways that people do it.


4

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 14 discusses Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He says that the source for having Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) is the Gemara Brachos 61a which discusses how Hashem was the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers) for Adam Harishon. Then he mentions that the Minhag is that the parents are the Shoshvinim (unterfuhrers). He brings this in the name of Shaalos ...


4

In Biblical times a father could actually agree to marry off his daughter under the age of twelve-and-a-half. (Deuteronomy 22:16). By the times of the Talmud the recommendation had become "she must be grown-up enough to agree to marry the fellow." Yes, a previously-married woman is considered more "on her own" than the first time around. See for instance ...


4

Short answer from Rabbi Shlomo Aviner: Naming a Daughter after a Male Relative Q: I saw that Ha-Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach said that there is absolutely no reason to name a daughter after a male relative (Ve-Alehu Lo Yibul Volume 2, p. 142). And it is written in Shut Tzitz Eliezer (7:49 #13) that a strict person will refrain from doing so. ...


4

You might want to take him to the store to pick out his very own yarmulke. Now it is his choice and he is doing it because he wants to do it. And every day he wears it he is wearing his yarmulke that he picked out. I have found that it is always best to give children choices when the choices are limited to approved behaviors. Children thus feel empowered ...


4

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


4

I recently read an interview with a daughter of Rav Ovadia Yosef ZT"L and during the interview she mentioned that her father Rav Ovadia always held a grandchild on his lap during bentching.


3

There are several issues. When I learned about it, the main issues involve if the child was born Jewish or not. This is from memory and from knowing someone that it affected. If the child was born Jewish and if the biological father was Jewish, then he should be called by the biological father's name. If the child was born Jewish and the biological father ...


3

Songs have helped me, and the children like to catch on to the words. Also teaching them a little about what we are saying in the tefilla, in a way they will understand.


3

A child born to a Jewish mother is Jewish,1 and one born to a non-Jewish mother is not. This is determined at the time of birth, which is why infant conversions are sometimes done when a woman is in the process of conversion. Changes in the mother's status after the child is born are not relevant. One source for this is Kiddushin 66b (in the mishna at the ...


3

To kind of restate @Gershon Gold's answer in the spirit of the question, the biblical source for the idea of escorting the Bride was G-d's escorting Eve to Adam. Genesis 2:22 states: וַיְבִאֶהָ אֶל הָאָדָם -- and He brought her to the man.


3

Rabbi Noach Orlowek in his book on parenting, My Child My Disciple, says that it is forbidden to let a child cry, because it will affect his Emunah - he will learn that no one answers you when you cry. In a private conversation (which will remain private by leaving out information), the Mashgiach of a well-known Yeshiva, upon hearing this, said "When my son ...


2

I heard from R' Kelemen that he asked R' Volve this question, and his response was that davening for the needs of one's children cannot be limited to the set times of prayer. It is necessary at every moment of child-rearing.


2

http://www.shtaygen.co.il/?CategoryID=817&ArticleID=7936 InParshas Lech Lecha - Braishis 15:15 it says that when Avraham will pass away ואתה תבוא אל אבותיך בשלום. Rashi explains that even though Terach was an idol worshipper it says come to your parent, since Terach repented prior to his death. The Marhasha was asked the following question when he was ...


2

During some shiurim, our local rav told us that if one has Jewish biological parents, he is required to treat them with the proper respect and to sit shiva for them. I could not find my notes on the subject, so this is from memory only.


2

The Tur indicates that a number of these apply to the woman (EH 25): Nidah - The woman would at least share responsibility. Shichrus - This applies if either spouse is intoxicated. Chatzufa - This applies specifically to a woman who verbally propositions her husband in an explicit manner. The Aruch HaShulchan (EH 25:9) mentions that m'riva refers to ...


2

Reishis Chachma, Shaar HaKedusha, Chapter 16, Shaar 4 seems to imply that all matters of thought and their effects in this area apply equally to the woman as to the man.


2

Generally, if the music is not for one's specific enjoyment, you can listen to the music. In your scenario, you are not the one listening to the music, anyway - your child is. And, s/he is not even listening for the enjoyment of the music, itself, anyway. Plus, there may even be more leniencies for a child below bar / bat Mitzvah, anyway. In summary, I ...


2

I am an active member of a Reform congregation and know a lot of converts through that channel. In addition, I've taken some training (from CCAR/HUC) designed to prepare lay people to assist with common synagogue tasks ("para-rabbinic", of a sort), and this training included conversion assistance. (Note: lay people do not make decisions in that area; ...


1

O Ch 191 (3) MB [8] says that one may not do a melacha while saying birkas hamozon. The MB says that even a תשמיש קל (a light activity) is prohibited. If holding a child is a light activity (or more) then it would be forbidden. In O Ch 183 (12) MB [37], it says that one may not make a brocho while doing work and the MB and Shaar Hatziyun say that this ...


1

Rabbi Moshe Eisemann in his book Of Parents and Penguins classifies the role of parents based on a Talmudic story in which Bartenura (wife of Rebbi Meir) tells him of the passing of their children with an analogy that a depositer came to take back his deposit. Based on this, Rabbi Eisemann develops the idea that the role of parents in Judaism is ...


1

The parent plays numerous roles and has numerous responsibilities. The general answer is that the parents must relay the principles of the Torah - meaning, the way to perform its laws as well as the ethical principles the Torah teaches, in short everything that is involved in becoming a Torah-observant Jewish person. This can be gleaned from numerous Torah ...


1

BSD I came upon this source after I asked this question, BH. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 143:17 "אסור לאדם להכביד עולו על בניו ולדקדק בכבודו עמהם שלא יביאם לידי מכשול אלא ימחול ויעלים עיניו מהם" In a nutshell the parent shouldnt ask too much of the child for respect, as this risks the child transgressing the commandment of kibbud av veim. Rather a parent ...


1

Whenever I deliver any sort of judgement on my kids, I always try to explain how I am thinking and the different considerations I am making, including whatever leniency might be applicable. Basically, I talk UP to my kids, rather than DOWN to them, even if they might not understand what I am saying in depth. In this way I try to get across the klallim ...



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