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16

Different people will argue different positions. But besides the derasha from a pasuk in chumash, a straightforward counter-claim can be made from Ezra perek 4: ב וַיַּעַן שְׁכַנְיָה בֶן-יְחִיאֵל מִבְּנֵי עולם (עֵילָם), וַיֹּאמֶר לְעֶזְרָא--אֲנַחְנוּ מָעַלְנוּ בֵאלֹהֵינוּ, וַנֹּשֶׁב נָשִׁים נָכְרִיּוֹת מֵעַמֵּי הָאָרֶץ; וְעַתָּה יֵשׁ-מִקְוֶה לְיִשְׂרָאֵל, ...


15

Yes. See Igros Moshe YD 2:130, and importantly the Rambam Mamrim 5:11 where he writes: הגר אסור לקלל אביו העכו"ם ולהכותו. ולא יבזהו כדי שלא יאמרו באו מקדושה חמורה לקדושה קלה שהרי זה מבזה אביו. אלא נוהג בו מקצת כבוד.‏ A convert is prohibited from cursing his non-Jewish father or hitting him. And he shouldn't disgrace him, so that people ...


14

There are two ways to be(come) Jewish: have a Jewish birth mother, or convert. It is possible that your adoptive parents had you converted when they adopted you, and that would be something to investigate. (Depending on who did the conversion and how, some in the community might not accept it as valid. You will probably want to obtain a copy of the ...


14

The Taz in YD 289 sk 3 is medayek (derives from a careful reading) that both the Rama and the Mechaber rule like the Rambam that if the mezuzah is placed below the upper third it is invalid even bediavad (after the fact). No one seems to mention any distinction based on the height of the room's occupants be they children or adults and it doesn't seem there ...


13

Other possible proofs (though, admittedly, not as strong as Josh's): In Lev. 24:10ff, we have the story of "the son of an Israelite woman, who was also the son of an Egyptian man" who blasphemed Hashem's name and was executed judicially for this offense. Now it is true that, according to halachah, non-Jews are liable to death for this too (Rambam, Laws of ...


13

Yes (Yevamos 78a, Bechoros 46a), the child is completely Jewish. However, slightly different Halachos may be applied in some cases. (For example, whether the child can marry a Kohen.) There is also a dispute over whether the fetus is considered a part of its mother or not, and therefore, whether the child was born Jewish, or is considered to have converted ...


12

Only three of his children are named in Tanach: his successor Rechavam, and two daughters named Tafath and Basemath, who married two of Shlomo's officials (I Kings 4:11,15). R. Chaim Dov Rabinowitz (Daas Soferim) comments that it seems likely that Shlomo had 100 children or less (which would of course mean that most of his wives were childless), since in ...


12

Josh, welcome to the site. In answer to your question, a distinction needs to be made between normative Halachic practice (aka Jewish law) and streams of Judaism that do not consider Halachah as binding (like Reform Judaism). I am not an expert in Reform conversion or synagogue standards, but my understanding is that the Reform community will welcome you as ...


11

In Be'er Moshe, R' Moshe Stern relates how it was the custom in his home not to allow children to see their reflection in the mirror before their teeth come in or before they begin to speak. In regard to several of these type of (bizarre) customs, he writes: וכל אלו הג׳ מנהגים בכלל מנהג נשים זקינות שעליהם כתב הרשב״א שאל יזלזלו בדבריהן ובמנהגיהם כי בודאי ...


11

It all depends on the teen and his/her background. Generally, with teens the issues fall into 1 of 3 categories and sometimes a mixture of the 3: No understanding of the depth/basic meaning of the liturgy (ie. no issues with the concept of talking to God or praying, but an issue with the codified liturgy) Deeper emunah issues (eg. an issue with the concept ...


11

The Talmud in Kesubos (52b) states: מצוה דנלבשה וניכסה וניתיב לה מידי כי היכי דקפצי עלה ואתו נסבי לה It is a Mitzva to clothe her, cover her, and give her stuff, so that men will jump at the chance to marry her. The three things mentioned presumably refers to clothing, jewelry, and money. Although the Gemara there says that it is a Biblical mitzva, see ...


11

Teach the difference from the very beginning. Even if they don't really understand the difference between saying that a story is written in the Torah, or is from a Midrash/Gemara/Rashi but doesn't appear in the Torah, you wont damage them by inserting a little comment right before/after a story giving its source. Kids are smart - they will hear what you ...


11

I'm not so sure it's as straightforward as follick said. True that Christianity is avodah zarah for us Jews; true also that it is, according to some posekim, also the same for non-Jews. Nevertheless, one of the major leniencies in this regard (alluded to by Shalom in his answer to the related question) is that most non-Jews nowadays aren't אדוק באמונתם, so ...


10

When teaching Kodesh at Yeshivas Toras Emes (High School) in Johannesburg almost 30 years ago, the Menahel HaRav Gedalia Sternstein שליט"א told me that the Rov - Rabbi Salzer זצ"ל - told him that it's best if the students learn about these things from the Gemora - BiKedusha uVeTaharo. As relevant topics came up, we were to explain them is as much detail as ...


10

The Lubavitcher Rebbe says (in a long speech about "Family Planning") that One of the strongest objections is fear of financial inability to support children. Naturally, parents want the best for their children, and fear of being unable to provide adequately is a powerful deterrent to having them. This is a genuine concern -- but based on an assumption ...


9

The default system (which, absent a will or any sentiments otherwise, halacha would apply upon the death of the father) is that daughters are supported from the estate until they are married. If there are funds beyond that available, they are divided among the sons. If there are X sons and none are the firstborn, the division is 1/X for each. If one son is ...


9

The Gemara in Kiddushin says it's a mitzva for a father to attempt to marry off his children. The Gemara then says, "for boys, that's easy. But how do I get someone to marry my daughter?" Answer: it's a mitzva to offer a nice dowry, to attract a boy to marry her. This is codified in Shulchan Aruch and commentaries there; if I recall correctly, a young woman ...


9

There is a famous story about Rabbi Yaakov Kaminetzky, told in the book, Reb Yaakov, by Yonason Rosenblum, pp.326-327. Reb Yaakov was particularly attuned to the dangers of exposing children to any kind of falsehood. He once visited the kindergarten of his son Binyamin's yeshiva and noticed that the mezuzah had been placed lower on the doorpost than ...


9

The Rambam writes that it is considered cruel to repeatedly refuse to forgive someone who asks sincerely for forgiveness. Under normal circumstances if they ask once, twice and then a third time you must forgive them, or else you become the one in the wrong. They however do need to appease the wronged party and make amends as far as possible, such as ...


9

Basically, we don't have the power to declare someone categorically exempt. Abudraham suggested one explanation, but our system of laws categorically says "all men are obligated", "all women are not." If a person is truly in a situation beyond their control, halacha recognize that. If it's five minutes before sunset and a single dad who hasn't yet prayed ...


8

Talk to them. As an ex Teen who once had no interest in Davening, I can speak from experience here. Most attempts to get me to Daven backfired. Find out why they aren't davening. Find out what they think davening is. Is it different than what you understand it to be? What do they think it is, what do they wish it was? I suggest getting a copy of "Call ...


8

I'll have to look for sources, but let's consider: the naming is done as part of a Mi Shebeirach that mentions "the new mother ---, and her daughter who was born at an auspicious time, and her name is ---." So if it turns out that the baby was a boy after all, then presumably the whole thing would be a patent falsehood and therefore of no halachic ...


8

" my 4-year-old has offhandedly pointed out that "God's not real," or "not a real person."" In response to this exact line of conversation I would suggest the following. Admit to the child that based on how they understand "real", or how you have taught "real" to them in the past, they are correct. Explain to the child that some things are real even if ...


8

In "What's in a Name", the English translation of Zusha Wilhelm's sefer "Ziv HaShemot", the following is stated: 1) Some say that one may name a male child after a female. (See Bris Avos 8:37; See also Koreis HaBris, Posach Eliyahu, note 8; See Kuntres HaShemos (revised edition), Vol 7, p. 10; See Sefer HaBris, p. 313; See the Midrash on Pinchas (13:12) ...


8

The Tashbatz in Siman 397 writes that it is inappropiate for a lady to be the Sandak even if her husband is the Mohel. The Rama in Yore Deah 265:11 writes that if a man is available a lady should not be Sandak as it is Peritzus.


8

Per Ohr.edu in the name of Rabbi Yosef Shalom Elyashiv Shlita, Children have a Chiyuv to respect their parents even after the parents have passed away. Attending the marriage of a surviving parent would be disrespectful to the deceased parent. See Hirhurim for more reasons.


8

Great question! This can be understood Cabalistically based on the idea that the soul of the deceased transmigrates into the new child. As such the soul of Machlon has passed into this child so that in a manner of speaking this is a child to Naomi. (cf. Likuetei Moharan 21:6) Furthermore note that during the discussion between Rus and Naomi about visiting ...


8

Sort of. Rambam writes (Teshuvah 4:3): To use translation on chabad.org (their additions in brackets, my one addition in {curly brackets}: Among these [24 {sins which make repentance hard}] are five [transgressions] for which it is impossible for the person who commits them to repent completely. They are sins between man and man, concerning which ...


8

That reminds me of the anecdote from Rabbi Emanuel Feldman's book, Tales Out of Shul. A woman once told him, "Rabbi, I'm really not enjoying this week of mourning." Not everything in life (or Judaism) has to be enjoyable. Nor is it meant to be. At least not in the immediate gratification, self-centered sense of the word. Sometimes your enjoyment should not ...


8

Alshich explains that Yisro was worried: Perhaps Moshe would not be interested in a Midyanite woman and would rather marry a Jewess. He therefore emphasized that he brought "her two sons" with him (and not "his two sons"), since a man comes to like his wife because of the children she bears him, and this would persuade Moshe to remarry Tziporah. (See also ...



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