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11

The Gra writes (Shenot Eliyahu to Brachot 1:1) that you have to read Shema yourself and you cannot fulfill your obligation by listening to another. (This is not universally agreed to, but see the next point.) As for the blessings, the whole point of having a Chazzan starting from (just before) Barchu is for him to recite the blessings of Keriat Shema out ...


7

The Rambam (Tefilah 9:9) and Rashba (Responsum 1:183) write that Maariv's status as reshut is the reason there is no enactment for the leader to repeat the Amida aloud for those who don't know how to pray.


6

Rama discusses a similar situation in ShA OC 54:3 where, after reciting Yishtabach, the congregation halted the prayer service for specific Mitzva/communal needs. He recommends in that case for the Chazzan to recite "some verses from Pesukei Dizimra" and say Kaddish "on them". (It seems to me that his specification of "from Pesukei Dizimra" is lav davka and ...


6

I witnessed the Rosh Yeshiva of Ner Israel several times pick up a sefer and learn when the Chazzan would choose a slow tune for Mimkomcha of the Shabbos Shacharis Kedusha. I don't see piyutim being any different than the sections between the primary lines of Kedusha, and certainly not any more stringent. The Rosh Yeshiva never learned or did anything ...


6

Seems that the answer is: Yes, one may do so a priori. See the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן כו - דיני קדיש יתום: סעיף יד: מִי שֶׁיָּכוֹל וְרָאוּי לְהִתְפַּלֵּל לִפְנֵי הַתֵּבָה, יִתְפַּלֵּל, וּמוֹעִיל יוֹתֵר מִקַּדִּישׁ יָתוֹם, שֶׁלֹּא נִתְקַן אֶלָּא לַקְטַנִּים. וּמִי שֶׁאֵינוֹ יָכוֹל לְהִתְפַּלֵּל כָּל הַתְּפִלָּה, יִתְפַּלֵּל מִן אַשְׁרֵי וּבָא ...


5

In Shulchan Aruch siman 123 siff 5 the Mechaber tells us the Sha'tz does not need to take 3 steps back after his repetition aloud of the Shmoneh Esrei. The Mishna Berurah 18 explains this is because he relies on the three steps he takes back after Uvah Litzion, and even though there might be Krias Hatorah and Hallel and Avinu Malkeinu, it is not a hefsek ...


5

This doesn't really answer your question definitively at all, but I thought it might interest you. I was reading through some of the autobiographical essays of R. Isaac David Essrig (1893-1976), who was a well-respected rabbi (although he wouldn't be considered a "gadol") originally from Israel but who moved during WW1 to America. For about seven years ...


4

According to this article from the Da'at website: During the repetition of the amida, it is the Tunisian custom for the congregation to respond "livracha" (meaning "for blessing") after the words "Morid hageshem" (meaning "He brings down the rain", recited during the winter months) or "Morid hatal" (meaning "He brings down the dew", recited during the ...


4

The Zohar (which is the source for saying this in the first place) states that the prayer should be said "כד מפקין ס"ת בצבורא למקרא ביה", when the Torah scroll is removed in the minyan to be read. Of course, this is still relatively ambiguous. The Siddur Maharsha"s (R. Shabtai Sofer), one of the first mainstream siddurim to include this prayer, says to say ...


4

Shulchan Aruch Harav Orach Chaim 68:1 (basically paraphrasing the Ramo, with a reference to the Maharil): ומכל מקום לא יעסוק בשום דבר ואפילו בדברי תורה אסור להפסיק לעסוק כל זמן שהצבור אומרים פיוטים כ"ש לדבר שום שיחה בטילה ומכל מקום מי שלומד על ידי הרהור שרואה בספר ומהרהר אין בזה איסור כלל שהרהור אינו כדבור ואינו חשוב הפסק אלא שיש לחוש להמון עם שאל יראו ...


4

The Radvaz says (in relation to a different question) that the first silent one is the one for his personal obligation, under the principle of תדיר, and the second is to fulfill the obligation of those who couldn't daven to themselves. It doesn't seem plausible that he would say that in only the case he was dealing with (where the Shatz missed the previous ...


3

From: Is it Time for Maariv? By Rabbi Yirmiyohu Kaganoff Rabbi Kaganoff points out that Rav Yosi ben Chanina in the Gemor makes the statement that each of the Avos instituted one daily prayer with Yaakov in Vayeitzei being shown to have instituted Ma'ariv. The question that arises is how Ma'ariv can be a reshus when Yaakov Avinu caused it to become ...


3

The reason the Talmud instructed the removal of the shat"z is because his omission was suggestive of ideological sympathies with the heretics of the time/meshumadim. That would not seem to be at all relevant to someone having a different nusach unless there was significant reason to suspect that indeed a similar ideological issue on the part of the shat"z ...


3

This is actually a machlokes among the contemporary poskim. See Dose of Halacha: R’ Moshe Sternbuch (Teshuvos Vehanhagos 2:81) holds that it is inappropriate for a child to lead anim zemiros. Nonetheless, R’ Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (12:96) held that a child may do so (See Ishei Yisrael 36:n196). Many shuls follow this, especially as they want to ...


3

Maariv is originally a tefillat reshut (optional prayer), so if one couldn't, one didn't. Mincha and Shacharit were already obligatory which is why the chazzan's repetition was enacted for those who couldn't on their own. Presumably even if your argument were otherwise a justification of instituting a chazarat hashatz for optional services, the tircha ...


3

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: It depends: The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch states in סימן יט - דיני משיב הרוח, טל ומטר, יעלה ויבא ועננו that it depends: If the mistake was in the first 3 Brachot and he noticed before ending his silent Amida, then he goes back, if doing so won't inconvenience the congregation. If he made any other mistake, he relies on his ...


3

The Ramma in siman 90 siff 23 explains the reason not to pray in front of pictures is because it distracts one from concentrating. This is the same reasoning The Mishna Berurah there uses to explain the Mechaber. So in fact any picture that distracts, such as one found on clothing as the Mechaber mentioned, are problematic. The Mishna Berurah also ...


2

This is addressed by the gemarah Yerushalmi Sotah 7:4 which learns the idea out of the pasuk in Devarim 27:26 אָרוּר, אֲשֶׁר לֹא-יָקִים אֶת-דִּבְרֵי הַתּוֹרָה-הַזֹּאת The gemarah explains that the standing (up) of the torah implies that the Chazzan should stand. ארור אשר לא יקים את דברי התורה הזאת. וכי יש תורה נופלת. שמעון בן יקים אומר זה החזן ...


2

I'm not sure if it's still of interest, but regarding a tune for Mizmor L'Dovid (Psalm 23), the popular one typically sung during Seudat Shlishit on Shabbat was composed by Rabbi Ben Zion Shenker. Here's a link to the song as sung by Cantor Leon Lissek - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJurFRxDTFQ NPR did a story about him in 2013 titled "The Greatest ...


2

Where is the source for not answering אמן to a ברכה until it is totally finished It's called an אמן חטופה and the Rambam (Hil. Brachot 1:14) already codifies it. The source is from Brachot 47a. As the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (6:10) defines it: גַּם יִזָּהֵר מְאֹד שֶׁלֹּא יַעֲנֶה אָמֵן קֹדֶם שֶׁסִּיֵּם הַמְבָרֵךְ כָּל הַבְּרָכָה, כִּי זֶהוּ אָמֵן ...


2

See this article. Excerpt: The classic Talmudic source on musical instruments is the Babylonian Talmud (rabbinic text finished in the year 500 and edited until approximately 650 C.E.), tractate Beitza 36b, in which the rabbis explain that the rabbinic prohibition is based on the concern that one might end up fixing the musical instrument if it ...


2

A chazzan does not wear the talis to be yotzeh the mitzvah of tzitzis. He only wears it to have an atiffa, for kavod hatzibur. This is the same reason he doesn't make a bracha on it when he puts it on.


2

The Shla (in mitzvat tefillin) wrote in the name of the Zohar (Emor) that "le-shem yichud Kudsha Brikh Hu..." should be said, as brought in the siddurim. This is agreed to by the Artzot Ha-chayim (25, Ha-me'ir La-aretz 29) and others (see, e.g., the introduction of the Shev Shematta). In contrast, the Noda Bi-yehuda wrote (OC vol. II, 107 and YD vol. I, ...


2

I'm "extraplocombing" (extrapolating and combining) the answers from your referenced question regarding Shacharit with Mishnah Brura 232:2. See Sha'arei Tzion #4, who points out that since Ma'ariv is reshut (not obligatory) we are not as concerned about the requirement of smichat g'ulah litfilah (loose translation - connecting the concept of redemption as ...


2

In a Shul that I Davened there was such an issue and the Kohanim would go out prior to the beginning of the Chazaras Hashatz and have their hands washed and Chazaras Hashatz began when they came back into the Shul. I was once in a different community where they installed a sink in the back of the Bais Medrash as they had this problem too. From Din.org - ...


2

The answer here, on the bottom of p. 3 may surprise you, as it surprised me. According to Rav Amram Ga'on, the Golel is the one that should be reciting this prayer all the time, not the shat"z. Note that he says "The last one rolls the Torah", meaning that the person who gotthe last Aliyah is the Golel. Also, note that he doesn't mention a magbi'ah. It's ...


2

While not the pesaq (Halakhic ruling) of Hakham 'Ovadiah A"H himself, his son Hakham Yitzhaq Yosef SheLIT"A, who more frequently than not rules like his father, states (my translation and emphasis) in Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 53:10): אין ממנים שליח צבור למי שאינו מבטא את האותיות כתקנן, כגון שקורא לאות חי''ת כמו כ''ף רפויה, או כמו ...


1

I haven't been able to locate a definitive source that authoritatively answers your question, so I hope that you'll be fine with what I infer from this source. The article, and the site is comprehensive, and I haven't found any other that delves into the history of tefilot as well. I will summarize some of the key points in the article. There is a ...


1

1 - To confirm that your question is accurate - see Shaarei Halacha U'Minhag - page 226 - at the top which mentions that for Selichos the Chabad Minhag is to wear a Tallis. 2 - The main reason for this is based on Rosh Hashana 17b where it says Hashem put on a Talis and said the Shelosh Esrei Midos. Therefore we emulate this by the Chazan putting on the ...


1

Your issue is discussed by the Ramma there, and his source. He quotes the Trumas Hadeshen #16 who used the idea of kavod habrios to relinquish someone praying publicly from moving four amos away, and from saying the yehi ratzon brought in the Mechaber. What the Ramma didn't mention is that the Trumas Hadeshen specifically mentions a kol shekein for a ...



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