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6

This doesn't really answer your question definitively at all, but I thought it might interest you. I was reading through some of the autobiographical essays of R. Isaac David Essrig (1893-1976), who was a well-respected rabbi (although he wouldn't be considered a "gadol") originally from Israel but who moved during WW1 to America. For about seven years ...


5

I had the same question years ago. I have used http://virtualcantor.com/ I liked the versatility of the site. But also its clarify for newcomers. I did not know the structure of the tefilla and therefore the way portions were broken up in a list of clearly named sound files really helped. I even found it to be useful in teaching me the amidah for davening ...


5

R Eliezer Melamed addresses this (online under 3 but also in The Laws of prayer p. 51) The chazan is the emissary of the congregation, and therefore a person is prohibited from taking hold of the chazanut unless he is asked to do so by the congregation or by the gabbai as its representative. Hence, one may not respond Amen to a person who appointed ...


4

Could not find the answer to clockwise vs. counter-clockwise, but found the answer to your second question in Aruch HaShulchan Orach Chayim 282:1: - סימן רפב - דיני קריאת התורה והמפטיר בשבת והש"ץ נוטל הספר תורה ופניו כלפי העם, ואומר בקול: 'שמע ישראל וגו', והעם עונים אחריו. ואחר כך אומר: 'אחד הוא אלקינו, גדול אדונינו קדוש שמו' ... והציבור עונין ...


3

The Rambam (Tefillah 14:8) says explicitly it's the Chazzan who calls. Tosfot (Berachot 34a) quote Rabbeinu Tam who says that the Chazzan cannot call out "Kohanim" as it is a Hefsek. He proves this from the Sifri (Naso 39) which says Kohanim is said by the "Chazzan" (in context "Chazzan" there is like what we call "Gabbai"), and from the Talmud in Sotah ...


3

Explicit Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:4 - סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה ואם יצאו מקצתן ודין השליח צבור צְרִיכִין שֶׁיִּהְיוּ כָּל הָעֲשָׂרָה בְּמָקוֹם אֶחָד, וְהַשְּׁלִיחַ צִבּוּר עִמָּהֶם, אֲבָל אִם מִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר זֶה וּמִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר אַחֵר, אֵינָם מִצְטָרְפִין, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁהַפֶּתַח פָּתוּחַ בֵּינֵיהֶם, וַאֲפִלּוּ אִם הָרֹב הֵמָּה ...


3

Davening from the amud is not an obligation indeed, and if someone else has priority one is not obligated to find another minyan in order to daven from the amud. It is a custom as a way of honoring one’s parent. R Avraham Yosef (Chief Rabbi of Holon, son of R Ovadia Yosef) was asked last Friday on his weekly radio halacha Q&A "what does one lose when ...


3

The sefer “Tefilloh Kehilchoso” says that in your case, the first chazan takes his three steps backwards after the end of the repetition. He quotes as his source the next Mishna B'rura to the one you quoted ie (:19) and says that this is also brought in the Kaf Hachaim. It seems to me that the Mishna B'rura does not state the halocho explicitly but the Kaf ...


3

This site has a response regarding bowing with the Chazzan: ראה לדוגמא בפירושי התפילה לרוקח, קדיש עמוד רמט 'על כן הקהל כופפין הקומה בשעה שהחזן אומ' ברכו על שם עבדו את ה' ביראה' עכ"ל.‏ It claims the source is a Rokach, who was a Rishon, and he cites a Pasuk as the source of the custom in his work on the Siddur. This site has an answer to the ...


3

Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe YD 4:61:4) ruled they should not split up because of BeRov Am, and all the more so in a case where the extra group would not be in a Shul or even a room without a Torah scroll. Rav Chaim Kanievsky (Gam Ani Odekha (Shonim) 3:34) says it is better in your situation not to split up into multiple Minyanim. Rav Yehuda Herzl ...


2

This article says: The prayer probably dates from medieval times; its authorship is unknown. The hazzanim of nineteenth century Eastern Europe added drama to their recitations of the prayer by approaching the bimah from the rear of the synagogue as they chanted. A story is told of Hazzan Joseph Altshul of Slonim. His choir would stand on ...


2

While not the pesaq (Halakhic ruling) of Hakham 'Ovadiah A"H himself, his son Hakham Yitzhaq Yosef SheLIT"A, who more frequently than not rules like his father, states (my translation and emphasis) in Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 53:10): אין ממנים שליח צבור למי שאינו מבטא את האותיות כתקנן, כגון שקורא לאות חי''ת כמו כ''ף רפויה, או כמו ...


2

Rabbi Eliezer Melamed says it is permitted. It is permissible to decorate the parochet (curtain) and the aron kodesh in the accepted manner, for people are accustomed to the decorations on them and the artwork does not distract them from praying.


2

Peninei Halachah brings a citation from the Rama 565:3 that we consider that an individual might be forced to break the fast before having fasted most of the day. Once he has fasted until mincha, then he can say aneinu (as long as he is still fasting). Even if he must break the fast after mincha, he has still fasted sufficiently to establish the day as "a ...


1

Ok, I will give some personal tips. Obviously there is no "source" for this. But I do often lead services myself (including this morning) and I am no "expert" really. This is based around the repetition of the Amidah. The rest of what is said is just a few lines (and of Ashrei, end of Tachanun and end of Aleinu) and a couple of recitations of Kaddish. ...


1

I remember hearing once that the Vilna Gaon (I think) said that Anim Zemirot is one of the holiest pieces of tefillah and it should only be said on Yom Kippur. I wonder whether since children are considered to be pure and their aveirot are not counted before Bar Mitzvah, if we are going to sing it every Shabbat, we have children do it as adults are not pure ...


1

I believe it is realted to the fact that years back many people didnt know how to read or didnt own a siddur so the chazzan was the one who read on behalf of the kehal


1

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus1 95:14 brings as follows. Turei Zahav Yore Deah 384:1, Derisha, and Pri Megadim say that Selichos is recited in the home of a Aveil. Shaalos U'Teshuvos Yehuda Yaaleh Yore Deah 353 says that the Aveil should also say the Selichos. Aveil Hashitim page 45 - 6, Machtzis Hashekel 131:10, say that although the Aveil says Selichos, the Aveil ...


1

This Beurei Hatefilah article cites that, in fact, there were / are various places where Hineni was / is recited, among one of the places - preceding Hamelech in Shacharit. Part of this discussion relates to the concept of reshut (permission). As it is, there is a form of reshut that the cantor recites during the 1st day of Rosh Hashannah Musaph, namely ...


1

I just looked up the Ateret Paz which Hacham Gabriel cited and he does not say that you have to answer. He brings a citation from Salmat Chaim who ultimately rules that you don't have to answer.


1

Since the shaliach tzibor is the representative of the group, he should do whatever is the custom of that shul. If the Rav is present, he is presumed to be the authoritative source of the will of the group. There are some shuls where the Rav has decided that, since some will not come if there is any delay (since their arrival time at work would thus be ...


1

I suggest contacting the folks at Machon Moreshet Ashkenaz, which is (in their words) "dedicated to the research, preservation and transmission of the unique religious values, customs, and folklore of German Jewry, as they existed prior to the Holocaust." This includes research into nusach and liturgigal minhagim. This page discusses liturgy and has some ...


1

The Rambam writes in Hilchos Tefillah Chapter 8, Halacha 4, "How do we perform Tefilla B’Tzibbur, Public Prayer? One person Davens out loud and everyone else listens." This teaches that Tefilla B’Tzibbur is only possible through the Shaliach Tzibbur. We can understand from here that the Shaliach Tzibbur is not just “leading the Davening”. Rather, he is ...



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