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11

I have seen some shuls that actually have people sign a formalized contract not to talk during davening and then post that near the entrance to the shul. I think that whatever the approach, the most successful way would be to get wide-spread buy in from everyone first. Any approach that singles people out, even with halachic basis, will have a hard time ...


11

I once visited the Kemp Mill Synagogue and IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY this was the deal they had made: the congregartion agreed not to talk at all during services, and in return the Rabbi agreed to give his sermon after all the prayers had ended (ie after mussaf), thus allowing for those who did not want to stay for the sermon to leave. The vast majority of ...


11

From the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch: ואפילו ללמוד אסור בשעה שהשליח צבור חוזר התפלה "And even learning is forbidden when the Chazzan repeats Shemoneh Esrei. From Daily Jewish Law One should not learn Torah during the repetition of the amidah. There are a few concerns: At least 10 men must pay attention to every word of the amidah; All of ...


9

One reason to be "meikel" is that according to R. Moshe (OH 2:29) the shatz must do his silent prayer like the tzibbur, in addition to the repetition. This serves as a rehearsal so that he will familiarize himself with the nusach that he will ultimately recite outloud. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=918&st=&pgnum=205


9

The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chaim 111:1 states that there should be no Hefsek between Geula and Tefila. Although the Rama says there is no problem answering Amen the accepted custom is that we do not answer Amen after Go'al Yisroel. Both options mentioned are options that are acceptable. Some Shuls the Chazan just says the last word quitely and in some Shuls ...


9

If you know the fellow publicly flouts shabbos-observance, then we have a problem. (And what does "publicly flout" mean in today's world is another question; Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik is quoted as saying that if he'd be embarrassed to be seen doing it while the rabbi walked by, that's still not "publicly flouting.") Rabbi Shternbuch was asked regarding a ...


9

I read in The Making of a Gadol that (according to R' Yaakov Kaminetzky) in Kenesses Yisroel in Slabodka during the week they did a hoiche kedusha for mincha because the institution of chazaras hashatz was for a beis hakenneses where baal habatim davened because of the possible presence of the ignorant, not for a beis medrash of baalei torah. Friday mincha, ...


9

Abudraham, in "Seder Shacharit shel Chol u-Ferushah", says( here, right column, lines 29-38): וכשיגיע ש"ץ ל'מודים' וכורע, כל העם שוחין ואומרין הודאה קטנה המתחלת כמו כן ב'מודים', שאין דרך העבד להודות לרבו ולומר לו 'אדוני אחה' על ידי שליח, אלא כל אדם צריך לקבל בפיו עול מלכות שמים, ואם יקבל על ידי שליח, אינה קבלה גמורה, שיוכל להכחיש ולומר לא ...


9

R. Yitzchak Abadi has told me that it's no problem, at any point in the prayers. There is also no need to make a shehakol if one is drinking the water for the sole purpose of lubricating one's throat. Shehakol is only recited on water when the drinking serves the purpose of quenching one's thirst (see Shulchan Aruch OC 204:7).


8

According to the Rambam (Hilchot Tefilla chap. 9), only the following sections of davening (prayer services) require a Chazzan [over Bar Mitzvah]: Kaddish Birchot Kriat Shema Shemona Esrei, Chazart haShatz, and Kedusha Tachanun, Ashrei and Uva L'Tzion In addition, if a part of davening doesn't require a minyan, it would make sense that a minor could lead ...


7

Tur (O.C. 57) says that the custom everywhere is for the cong. to say יתברך וכו when the chazzan says Borchu, but it's really better not to say it, so that the people will pay attention to what the chazzan is saying. He notes further that Rav Amram Gaon does not bring this prayer, though the Rosh in a Teshuvah writes that he heard that it is said "in all ...


7

There is a long (20 pages) and detailed discussion of this question in the sefer Iyunei Halachos by D. Y Zvi Rabinowitz published in 2003. It includes all the sources that discuss this question and the opinions of the recent poskim. While there is no conclusive answer because there are opinions on both sides of the question, it is certainly worthwhile to ...


7

I think the source of this minhag is in the Talmud (TB Rosh Hashana 17b): ויעבור ה' על פניו ויקרא א"ר יוחנן אלמלא מקרא כתוב אי אפשר לאומרו מלמד שנתעטף הקב"ה כשליח צבור והראה לו למשה סדר תפלה אמר לו כל זמן שישראל חוטאין יעשו לפני כסדר הזה ואני מוחל להם (Roughly: "Hashem passed before him, and He called" (Shmot 34:6): Said R' Yochanan: if this scripture were ...


7

Levush (Orach Chaim 488:1) says that we start with הא-ל בתעצומות on Yom Tov, because all of them are "in remembrance of the Exodus from Egypt," when Hashem displayed His mighty power. He also says (ibid. 584:1) that we start with המלך on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (and change the wording to המלך יושב, "the King is sitting"), because these are the times ...


7

The Mishna was referring to specific sects at the time. If we had solid reason to believe today that a person's dress indicated serious rifts with mainstream Jewish theology, we'd think twice about having them lead prayers (and, as was done then, apply poetic license in how to recite the texts). I don't really see that as an issue now.


7

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 232:1) recommends doing this when השעה דחוקה=the time is pressing, which the Rama (OC 124:2) defines as when the congregation is afraid that if they do the full repition they won't finish by the end of the allotted time for that prayer. (See Biur Halacha OC 124 sv SheYa'avor who debates if this is Chatzot or Sof Zman Tefillah in ...


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein's guidance on what to do if your personal text differs from the congregation's (and you're just sitting in your seat, not the chazan) is to say your text for anything that's private and quiet, and the congregation's for anything that's public and out-loud. Rav Moshe then discusses which exact parts of Kedusha fall into which of those ...


6

The opinion of the Shulchan Aruch, Orah Haim, Siman 124, S'if 4 is that 9 men answering is required, but the Mishnah Berurah (S'if Katan 19) brings down from Magen Avraham and the Maharil (Ashkenazic authorities) that the common custom is to use even those who are not listening to complete the minyan (which would mean 6 listening and 3 not listening). The ...


6

In Rambam's text of the siddur (printed after the various laws of prayer, blessings, and the like, in the back of his code), he writes: The chazan says each one calls the other, and the congregation answers holy holy holy ... the chazan says by David, your holy anointed one, and the congregation replies G-d shall reign forever. And all the parts that ...


6

It's not unique. It's because it's the last blessing in a series. The same is true for bone (b'rachamav) Y'rushalayim after a meal and the final b'racha of Halel and p'suke d'zimra. Specifically, SA OC 215:1 has that we say amen to our own b'racha in each of these cases even without hearing someone else simultaneously, and I believe S'faradim follow this ...


6

Yes, Taame Haminhagim 681 says (with my own translation): טעם שהש״ץ מתעטף בציצית כשמשכימין לסליחות אע״פ שאין זמן ציצית, משום דאיתא, הקב״ה נתעטף בציצית כש״ץ והרגיל למרע״ה י״ג מדות, אלמא כשאומר י״ג מדות יתעטף בציצית The reason the shatz (leader) wraps himself in tzitzis when we arise early for s'lichos although it's not yet the hour for tzitzis is ...


6

The decree is that one must repeat the Amida if there is a minyan praying together. There is no decree, however,that one must look for people that don't know how to pray. Therefore, in the time of the Gemara, one had to do a chazaras hashatz even when there were no ignoramuses in the minyan. So nowadays one must still repeat the Amida even though there ...


6

The Shulchan Aruch rules (OC 124:3) קהל שהתפללו וכולם בקיאים בתפלה, אעפ"כ ירד ש"צ וחוזר להתפלל, כדי לקיים תקנת חכמים A congregation which prayed and all of them were adept at praying, even so the leader goes back and repeats the prayer [aloud] in order to fulfill the enactment of the sages. So the Halacha is clear; the question is why? ShmuelBrin ...


6

Yes, there is a source: Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 69. They are doing what is known as "Perisah al haShema" whereby individuals who didn't hear Kaddish, Kedusha and Barchu can make it up with a later quorum. The details about how to do this are complicated and there are many opinions about what can and cannot be made up as well as how many of the people ...


6

I asked this question just this week to HaRav Zundel Kroizer. I asked if I could fly to EY knowing I would miss minyanim and kadeshim during the flight, but improve my learning here. He said the zchus of learning was far greater.


6

I was talking to a friend of mine today about this question and he told me that recently he was in a Shul and no one wanted to Daven Musaf for the Amud. The Gabai has already Davened Shacharis and read the Kriyas HaTorah. So the Gabai made a loud announcement "Good Shabbos - Thanks for all of you joining with our Minyan. I am leaving now and will come back ...


6

The rule of thumb Rabbi Moshe Feinstein applies is to not be disruptive. In communities where it is clearly the standard practice that all men wear tallitot, I would think that doing otherwise would be disruptive and/or disrespectful. (And what's the downside, really?) As for what text you yourself use, as long as you're not too loud, generally people ...


6

I have no source other than my teachers(' Mesorah?), but I was taught, and I believe, that it is proper for the חזן to wait until after the completion of the קדיש. It seems to me that, rather than waiting for praise, he is preventing distraction, and his presence and staid stance at the עמוד help to maintain the decorum through the last words of the קדיש.


5

I have heard from my uncle, who has been very active in the Jewish Music industry, that when he played the tune Ashkenazim use for singing the seder (order) of the Seder Night (Kadesh, Urchatz, etc.) for his music professor, the professor exclaimed that the tune was at least 1000 years old. Then I sang the tune for some sefardic friends who exclaimed that ...



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