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16

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


14

I appreciate your dilemma. If the novelty of the approach is what is stirring you today, when it does become familiar and regular to you, no matter what approach it is, it will become boring and uninspiring. There are certain universal principles for growth that you will find in any legitimate approach that can keep the words of Torah "as fresh as the day we ...


13

As I understand it, the markings of these shevas follow the rules given by R' Shlomo Zalman Hanau, an important 18th-century grammarian. In his system, every sheva following a tenuah kallah (a "light" vowel, i.e., one that substitutes for a sheva or a chataf vowel) is vocalized; examples include מַלְכֵי (since the independent form is מְלָכִים) and נֶעֶרְמוּ ...


12

There is a Chabad way of learning Gemara, as described by the Rebbe Rashab, the 5th Lubavitcher Rebbe and founder of Yeshivat Tomchei Temimim. In his Kuntres Eitz Chayim, he explains why it is necessary to learn Chassidus in addition to learning Gemara properly. The entire text is available online in English. From the introduction to the english ...


12

Yours should be a journey of discovery, not simple menu selection. With time and investigation, you will find which of the two options you gravitate towards. I would recommend spending some time with each group (not concurrently), learning the respective Chassidus of each, experiencing how the Chassidim interact among themselves and with others outside of ...


12

This custom is known as gebrochts (Yiddish for "broken"); or "matza shruya" (soaked matza) in modern Hebrew. It's prevalent in many Hassidic and Hassidically-influenced communities, though many first encounter it with Lubavitch. The custom arose out of concern that there may be a packet of dry flour in your matza. If that flour never reacted with water, ...


12

Chabad-Strashelye was started by R' Aharon Strashelye after the passing of the Alter Rebbe, the first Chabad Rebbe, due to different ideas of how to practice the teachings of Chabad. According to the Wikipedia article: After Rabbi Aharon died, his son[who?] became Rebbe in his place. However, the dynasty did not last into the next generation. Many ...


12

R' Moshe himself apparently used Beis Yosef kesav. In his letter to the Lubavitcher Rebbe about Rabbeinu Tam's tefillin (Igros Moshe, vol. 6, no. 9), at the end, R' Moshe asks that the sofer whom the Rebbe charged with writing him a pair of R"T tefillin (I have heard orally that this was R' Eliezer Zirkind) should do so using Beis Yosef script, so that it ...


11

This article (PDF) says: Credit for being the first "legitimate" Hasidic rebbe to settle in the United States appears to go to the Ukrainian Twersky family. R. David Mordecai Twersky, a descendant of R. David Twersky, the Tolner Rebbe, settled in New York in 1912. Earlier in the article, though, he mentions reports from 1893 in New York and 1894 ...


11

The Kaliver Rebbi. It was pulled out by the Nazis Yemach Shemom. http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A7%D7%95%D7%91%D7%A5:Kaliver_rebbe.jpg


11

The Satmar book, The Rebbe, mentions a different version of that story. The Rebbe is quoted as saying: Had Humphrey spoken to me in support of the Zionist state, it wouldn't have bothered me in the least. We Jews have a Torah which forbids us to have a state during the exile, and therefore we may not ask the Americans to support the state. But a ...


10

A couple of other possibilities: "the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l (or some other appropriate honorific)" - my preferred form on this site and elsewhere "the late Lubavitcher Rebbe" In conversation with non-Lubavitchers, "the Lubavitcher Rebbe" is probably unequivocal enough for most purposes (and in conversation among Lubavitchers, "the Rebbe"). It's much the ...


10

There is a booklet called Minhagei Melech that purports to collect all of the Lubavitcher Rebbe's customs; it states (pp. 28 and 34) that he indeed repeated the word with both vocalizations. However: It's questionable how reliable these reports are (not just the ones in MM, but more generally, oral descriptions of what the Rebbe said or did); in some ...


10

The first Chasidic Rebbe to come to America was R. David Mordecai Twersky who came in August of 1913. The First American Chasidic Rebbe, I think would have to go to Grand Rabbi Pinchas Duvid Horowitz, the founder of the Boston Chasidim. He arrived in America via Israel and Europe in 1915. The First American Chasidic Rabbi, would be Rabbi Abraham Ash,who ...


10

Those that go to Uman - go because they believe that Rabbi Nachman promised that if you come and pray at his grave on Rosh HaShana he will make sure that you have a good year. Many Rabanim are against this (Harav Ovadia Yosef amongst them). Woman do not go on Rosh HaShana both for Tznius and practical reasons (someone has to take care of the family). ...


10

Breslever chasidim leave E"Y to be by our rebbe at Rosh Hashana because he said to come, end of story. Not all Breslevers go - one of the great leaders of Breslev today, R' Elazar Kenig shlita, hosts a gathering in Meron for those who are unable to go. There is no specific issur in Uman. The issues of kivrei tzadikim and leaving E"Y in general are complex ...


9

It could be based on the prohibition of Chukot HaAku"m, as wearing a tie has no particular inherent practical purpose. See particularly (and ironically) the Beiur HaGr"a YD 178 sk 6.


9

Most Chasidim do not wear ties. However there are some that do. Those that do not - do so as "In Der Alte Heim" they did not either. Those that do - do so as "In Der Alte Heim" they wore them. For example: The Skvere Chasidim wear boots year round. The reason they wore them "In Der Alte Heim" was due to the severe cold weather. However they have continued ...


9

Since no one seems to have answered the last question, namely, are there any Chabad commentaries on the Gemara.... There are many talks and writings from all the Lubavitcher Rebbeim on different topics in Gemara. As far as I know, there is no one systematic commentary on the Gemara, and as their discussions of Gemara topics are usually (though not always) ...


9

Who is your Rebbe? Which chasidus are you? Where do you daven?


9

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


9

The Rebbe did not state that anyone who comes to his grave and prays will be granted a good year. He made a promise that anyone who travels to his grave, recites the Tikkun K'lali, donates at least a couple pennies to charity in his name, and, perhaps most importantly, take it upon himeself to leave his errant and foolish ways, then the Rebbe will do ...


9

As others have answered, the photo of the Rebbe you are thinking of is all but certainly the Kaliver Rebbe shlita, HaRav Menachem Mendel Traub. As mentioned, the Kaliver Rebbe shlita is a Holocaust survivor, and it is my understanding (as well) that it was during this time he lost his beard. The version of the story I heard is different than Gershon Gold's ...


8

First ascertain for yourself what exactly caused you to grow disillusioned with your previous path. You may have already rationalized this, but it might deserve another look. If there are underlying issues behind it, you'll solve nothing by moving along to another path. Spend some time thinking about your life. Get in touch with your emotions and try to ...


8

When a certain Chabad family in Detroit wanted to send their son to Rav Bakst's yeshiva, Rav Bakst felt that because of the derech halimud (style of learning) of what the boy had experienced in a previous Chabad yeshiva, which was more about learning up the texts (girsadige) he would not do well in his regular misnagdishe-litvishe yeshiva. The family did not ...


8

We do see that the Maggid entrusted R' Shneur Zalman with certain special tasks, such as the writing of an "updated" Shulchan Aruch, and the design of letterforms for STaM that would satisfy both the halachic (Beis Yosef) and kabbalistic (Arizal) opinions. The Maggid also gave him the title of "our Rav." As far as I know, these facts are not in dispute, not ...


8

The Lubavitcher Rebbe said that the custom among Lubavitch was to cut the Peos. He said that there are a few reasons, one of which is to avoid mixing the two types of light from the 13 strands of the beard. He also mentioned that the Arizal used to cut his Peos (as is written in the Shaarei Hamitzvos and Taamei Hamitzvos parshas Kedoshim).


8

Rabbi Yosef Avraham Heller, the Rosh Kollel of Crown Heights, Brooklyn and former member of the Beis Din there, wrote a essay explaining the Halachic justification for davening after Chatzos, published in "Kobetz Beis Chayenu" 11 Nissan 5760 pg. 28. The crunch of the explanation is as follows: The Gemora (Brochos 26a) states that, "He may go on praying ...


7

Sefer Ben Ish Hai Year 2 Bereshit Ot 29(Quoting from the English Edition published by Ahavat Shalom): One then commences the physical preparations for qiddush. It should be noted that there are profound kabbalistic kawwanoth in each of these actions, so one should not omit any of them. One should recieve the cup of wine with both hands form someone ...


7

To elaborate on what Gershon Gold said, some Chassidim davka wear ties. A prominent example that comes to mind is the house of Ruzhin, which includes, for example, the Sadigura and Boyaner courts, among others, in which even the Rebbes wear ties.



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