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4

At the 2014 International Bible Contest for Adults (חידון התנ"ך הבינלאומי למבוגרים תשע"ה) televised finals1, celebrated grammarian2 Dr. Avshalom Kor (אבשלום קור) posed this question among a series of short vignettes about "Ma'oz Tzur" that he presented while the next contestant was getting into place. He answered that the 'ו' preceding "his possessions" is ...


3

The Chochmas Adam 89:1 wrote that the Vilna Gaon abolished the minhag of decorating the synagogue with trees in honor of Shavuos because of the problem of Chukkas HaGoy (i.e. the practice of decorating a tree for the Christian's Holiday). The Chochmas Adam held that such a problem would even justify nullifying a practice mentioned (but not commanded) in the ...


0

Read it not as כהיום הזה but as כה יום הזה -- this 25th day. It refers to the 25th day of the month, which is Chanukah.


-1

tell your frind to go back to basics. the gemoro Shabbos 21b clearly states that chanuka is a yomtov at the begining of the tikuney zohar chadash writes that chanuka is part of the moadim. saying chag sameach has nothing to do with the gramatical biblical conotation of the words with the root חג. woulldnt have gone down that line! sorry for being so ...


0

In short: Mikeitz is often Shabbos Chanukah, but not always. Every now and then the calendar gives us a year where we actually read the split-the-baby story.


3

I did a luach chart for this. When Rosh Hashanah falls on Shabbat, Simchat Torah is a Sunday (or Shabbat in Israel) so B'reishit is a whole week later, the latest date it call fall. When Rosh Hashanah (and thus Shmini Atzeret) is on a Thursday you start reading B'reishit at an earlier date. When Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat (or Monday) you never get 29 ...


0

I'm not sure what the general policy is around here regarding quoting books of the Apocrypha, but the Book of Maccabees gives a totally different explanation, nothing to do with oil: the eight days was meant to parallel Sukkos, since the Jews were unable to celebrate Sukkos of that year due to the Greeks having taken over the Beis Hamikdash. (Macabees II ...


2

The Beis HaLevi writes that the miracle was that the sages of the time, in order to ensure that the oil would last for the whole 8 days, only poured 1/8th of the oil into the Menorah each night, and they made the wicks 1/8th of their usual size, so it would burn slower, albeit with a smaller flame. Hashem made a miracle that the flame burned as brightly and ...


3

Otzer Kol Minhagei Yeshurin & Nitei Gavriel Chanuka 40:18 mention a reason from the Binyan Shlomo 38 that this is based on the Rambam that when they when one lit the candles in the morning he is also doing the Mitzva if the candles extinguished. Nitei Gavriel also mentions in the name of Nehar Mitzrayim that it is done for Pirsumei Nisa. The Nehar ...


5

The custom is not to exempt the homeless, it's for pirsumei nisa; while nobody would notice candles during the day if they're by someone's house, today the lighting of Chunnukah candles in shul is noticeable enough that, while there's certainly no obligation to do so, the custom developed to light there as well. The Pri Megadim (Eishel Avraham 670:2), ...


2

This is a machlokes Rishonim. It is brought in the Ran to the Rif's Hilchos Chanuka, first paragraph. The Ran first proves and then defends the opinion that it cannot be used even for mitzvah purposes, and then cites the Baal HaMe'or that you could use it for mitzvah purposes. The Ran's primary proof is that they allowed the use of inferior oils for ...


4

The Emes L'yaakov (by R' Yaakov Kamenetsky) on Parshas Miketz is clear that they may not be used even for Mitzva use. He compares Chanuka lights - forbidden to benefit from - to Shabbos candles - we benefit from as they bring Shalom into the house. הנה לכשנתבונן בב' מיני נרות שנצטוינו להדליק נר שבת ויו"ט ונר חנוכה, הא' ניתן להשתמש בו ואדרבה בלא תשמיש א"צ ...


5

According to most philologists/etymologists, the Biblical Hebrew word חג means something similar to a festive pilgrimage or gathering. It is thus related to the modern similar-sounding Arabic word Hajj, which refers to the Islamic obligatory pilgrimage. In that case, חג is only applicable for the three Biblical holidays when there's an obligation to make a ...


4

Supplemental to the answer, above, that lists the specific years, here's the general scenario: The months of Cheshvan and Kislev can have either 29 or 30 days, each, and there are 3 configurations. To understand when and why they occur, see this Wikipedia article. Briefly, if the 1st day of Rosh Hashannah occurs on Shabbat, and the year is "deficient", ...


7

There's an article on this by Dose of Halacha. Here's an excerpt: While the Rema (OC 671:7) follows the Rivash that one can’t fulfil one’s obligation to light through the shul’s menora, the Kolbo (44) writes that one reason for this minhag is on behalf of those who don’t light at home. The Beis Yosef (OC 671:7) writes similarly that visitors can fulfil ...


3

According to the Beis Yosef in siman 671 they needed to go through the tahara process of para aduma which took seven days and one more for the oil making. He also brings the Ran who says the oil refinery was 4 days travel away. Four there, four back, there's eight days for you.


2

Don't forget that they were fresh from fighting a war. They had to purify themselves from the tum'as meis. They also had to make sure that everything was done in taharah. Also the pressing had to be only the first squeezing (without pressure) of the olives. It is not quite as simple as it seems.


4

The Avnei Nezer 2:500 quotes several opinions that state that one needs to have the candles lit in some sort of kli (vessel) and not just stuck onto a table. (h/t: DoubleAA) R. Shmuel Kamenetsky (Kovetz Hil. Chanukah pg. 29) also writes that one should be careful to use a kli, even if one is using wax candles that can stand by themselves. However, R. ...


1

Apparently, you do need a menorah, according to some opinions brought by the Avnei Nezer (2:500), cited in this answer by Double AA. ( I found this answer while doing research for this question :P )


1

Source article: http://www.torahmusings.com/2014/12/guests-travelers-chanukah/ First of all, as the question assumes, there is an obligation for a traveler to light candles (Shabbos daf 21, Shulḥan Arukh 677:1). If the traveler's wife will be lighting for him in his house, the custom of the Sefardim (see Beis Yosef there) would be for the guest not to light ...


6

They used a half of a lug of oil in each candle every night, in order that it would last through the longest night of the year (Menachos 88b). A lug is 6 egg volumes. An egg volume is disputed, but it's accepted to be either around 57 (R' Chaim Naeh) or 100 (Chazon Ish) mL. So the volume per candle was about 172 or 294 mL, or about 1200 or 2050 mL total.


2

It contained a half a lug of oil. See Maharsha Chullin 55 and Rivevos Ephraim Chelek 3:460:23.


0

I was scheduled to eat at another family's house this year on Friday night of Chanuka, and I asked my rabbi what to do. He said that I should either light my menora at home or light and sleep at the other family's house.


3

Assuming there are separate receptacles for each light, a menorah can be any shape. However, the the Biur Halacha in siman 671 siff 4 quotes a Maharshal that lighting in a circular utensil is not a hiddur for ner Chanuka. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in siman 139 siff 9 says to make the lights 'straight in a row, not one high and one low'. This has become ...


15

Actually, Miketz does not always fall out on Chanukah. It appears that whoever told me that was mistaken. :) I ran some code (using my JavaScript Hebcal API) and discovered that in the 100 years from 5700-5800, Miketz is not on Chanukah 10 times. In 5703, 5706, 5710, 5730, 5733, 5737, 5757, 5761, 5781, and 5784, Miketz fell out on the 4th of Tevet, just ...


4

See Kitzur Shulchan Oruch 139 (6) וצריכין ליזהר שיתן כל אחד ואחד נרותיו במקום מיוחד, כדי שיהיה היכר כמה נרות מדליקין or as Ohr Someach expresses the halacha: If a number of people are lighting in one household they should make a slight separation between their menorahs so that there is no confusion to the observer as to the number of candles. ...


1

Kitzur Shulchan Aruch rules that the eight substantive flames all be on a level with the helper flame higher; that the flames not be so close to one another as to form one flame (or to melt adjacent candles if using candles); that two wicks not protrude from the same opening of an oil lamp; and that [if using oil] the lamps not be earthen and used more than ...


1

See Pri Tzadik Chelek Aleph on the first chapter on Chanukah (page 136 in the more common edition: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=21327&st=%D7%97%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%9B%D7%94&pgnum=235&hilite=27a5da15-dd79-4acf-bae5-d529fa949c80) He asks the question why are the laws of Chanukah discussed in the Talmud in Shabbos and rather one would ...


1

I'd heard it discussed. If I recall correctly, the suggestion was that while the song is generally describing the Jewish people as a collective entity, each person needs to give thanks in their own way.


3

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that the Baal HaTanya when composing the siddur had in front of him 60 different siddurim. This version appears in the Abudraham among others (listed at the link). The plain-meaning logic behind the selection is: "For the wars" isn't understood - it should be "for winning the wars" or something similar. Another version of ...


1

I have seen the 2nd version in Chabad and a few other Nusach Sefard texts. From what I have heard from a few sources - Chabad people as well as several of my rebbei'm, there is some objection to attribute the winning of a war as a significant part of Chanukah, as people mistakenly think that it was the might of the Macabbees and their war strategies that ...


11

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 672:2 שכח או הדד ולא הדליק [....] ומיהו הני מילי לכתחילה; אבל אם עבר זה הזמן ולא הדליק, מדליק והולך כל הלילה. ואם עבר כל הלילה ולא הדליק, אין לו תשלומין If one forgot and didn't light, or purposefully didn't light [....] however, this is only lechatchila; if [the end of sunset] has passed and one didn't light, they should light ...


2

In short, the mitzvah to light has already been fulfilled by your wife, assuming she's Jewish, as per answers and comments to this question, and you have already gained the mitzvah via your wife's lighting. The fact that others in the household light the candles is what is called hiddur mitzvah - enhancing the mitzvah. If you're following this rule, you ...


4

This, according to Halachipedia: A wedding on Chanukah If the wedding takes place at night then the groom fulfills his obligation with the lighting in his father's house which took place before the wedding. [35] If the wedding takes place during the day before sunset, the groom [...] doesn't fulfill his obligation with the lighting in his ...


3

In "Chanukah with Torah Tidbits," an overview of Chanukah practices by Phil Chernofsky of the OU Israel Center, it says: Some have the custom of preparing the Chanukiya in the morning for the evening (this goes for every day, except Shabbat, of course). This not only serves the practical purpose of being ready to light on time without delaying to set up ...


3

Nitei Gavriel Chanuka 23:15 says that there are those that put in the wicks and oil in the evening when the proper time for lighting has arrived. (Rabbi Aaron M'Karlin, Kamarna, Kaliver Rabbi). This would indicate to me that there is no problem to prepare earlier if one wants, although it is preferable to do it immediately prior to lighting. As per my ...


0

Traditional object not a ritual, and it should go from right to left like any other hebrew.


0

Chanuka has a prohibition of work while the candles are lighting. Not exactly like other Yamim Tovim, but still. We have Hallel Not allowed to fast or eulogize


8

The Mishna B'rura (672:6, citing Magein Avraham 672:3) writes: If he put a lot of oil so that the flame will last longer, there is no mitzva in this. But with wax candles, there is a beautification of the mitzva when they are long. Nevertheless, one should not make them inordinately long. The distinction between oil and wax is based on the Magein ...


2

This is going to be unsourced untill I get around to it. In modern societies where people are walking the streets till eleven o'clock or so, the time period of 'ad shetichla regel min hashuk' is extended. This idea is mentioned by a few poskim both as a leniency to allow one to make a bracha when lighting later in the night and there is no-one else home. ...


2

Rabbi Dovid Feinstein advised me to appoint my wife as a shomer(es) to remind me to light when we got home so we could eat at a motzei shabbos chanuka Chanukah party without going home to light first.


3

A shiur by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz that I listened to recently, but can't seem to find just now, notes that one option, recommended by Rabbi Baruch Simon, is that the person can light a flashlight on the plane. It has batteries present, so that is better than the usual electric menorah which relies on a power source that is not present (a power plant far ...


7

According to Rabbi Shlomo Fisher on ohr.edu, someone flying is exempt from lighting, because the rule is one candle per household ("נר איש וביתו;" Shabbos 21b); and if there's no one at home then there is no obligation to light.


5

At the back of Yabia Omer Vol 10 OC (Siman 55), he has notes on Rav Poalim. There, in section 37 he writes as follows: ח"ב חאו"ח סימן סב. נשאל הרהמ"ח על מ"ש הרמ"א (סי' תרו ס"א) שאם ביקש מחילה מחבירו כדת, ולא רצה למחול לו, יאמר אח"כ בפני עשרה שביקש ממנו מחילה. האם מועיל לומר כן אפילו בפני עשר נשים. והשיב, דלכתחלה יאמר במעמד עדה שהם ...


2

Orach Chaim 673:1 permits all types of wax. I think the reason some use beeswax as opposed to paraffin is due to the nicer light, less dripping, longer lasting, better quality of beeswax candles. http://www.hiveandhoneyapiary.com/beeswaxvsparaffin.html


5

I'd say, "mess away!" While relatively recent Hassidic sources have ascribed all sorts of significance to the dreidel, if I'm not mistaken the earliest sources simply discuss the practice of gambling on Chanukah. (Chavos Yair, if I'm not mistaken.) Dreidel seems to simply be a form of gambling that rabbis originally tolerated at best, that at some point ...


2

The Sefer Nitei Gavriel Perek 20:5:note 12 writes that many people use wax for the shamash. The sources include the Hagaos Maharil,Minhagei Chabad pg 275 since the name wax in Hebrew has connotations to the Holy Names, and besides for the reason it produces a nice light there are kabbalistic reasons as well ,see Magen Avraham siman 288:3 also mentions the ...


1

Piskei Teshuvos speaks on Mishna B'rura 677:4 about married sons who go to their parents for the night(s) of chanukah. If they intend to stay overnight, then they light at their parent's house. But if they are going home to sleep they must light at home. Then he says, There is someone who says that if they desire to eat and drink in the company of ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch does say "בשוגג" (inadvertently) as you pointed out. Not eve discussing doing it on purpose. Here (though unsourced) it says you would need to relight, without a bracha (near the end) Rav Dov Lior explains (part b) the relevant Talmud (Shabbat 21b) and states (end of first paragraph) that one would not need to relight if it went out, but ...



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