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8

There is no obligation to eat any food on Shabbat which harms you or is painful, even if that means fasting completely (OC 288:2). I obviously don't know your friend's medical details, but if there is nothing he is allowed to eat then he is simply exempt.


7

Taamei Haminhagim - page 77 - #176 *note on bottom giving a Kabalistic reason, says that it is to be Mevatel tho Koach of the Chitzonim. It seems from his wording that if you take off a small piece of it, you can eat the rest of it.


4

He can use oat bread which is gluten-free and is biologically unrelated to wheat or barley. Not all poskim consider oats to be hamotzi (that's its own question) so you should mention to your relative to ask his rabbi. As DoubleAA pointed out, he would probably prefer to use oat matza instead of attempting to eat oat-bread.


4

I heard the reason is that in the older days they use to bake the bread in a common oven. So one bread useD to touch the other. So when you eat your bread you maybe also eat a bit of the bread from the other. There is an inyan of "koshe leshikra" something that can make you forget you learning, is gezel. By not eating the end you're for sure not "gezel" the ...


4

In our house (and also growing up) the end piece was left over because people like the softer middle slices of the challah (also, sliced rye). (Which reminds me, l'havdil, of the Rav Moshe story where he was asked about his custom to hunch - he had trouble standing straight.)


3

from Menachem Mendel: The earliest apparent source for using the term ḥallah in connection with the bread that is eaten on Shabbat can be found in the 15th c. German work Leket Yosher (p. 49) [See John Cooper’s Eat and Be Satisfied: A Social History of Jewish Food]: וזכורני שבכל ע”ש עושין לו ג’ חלות דקות הנילושות בביצים ושמן ומעט מים. וחלה ...


3

The source for cutting into the bread before making the blessing is in order to minimize the appearance of interruption between the blessing and the eating (S.A. O.C. 167:1 with Magen Avrohom 3). This cut should be made such that it is not deep enough that were you to lift the smaller part the larger part would not come up with it (ibid). However, that is ...


3

I always thought that people didn't not eat the end piece as much as they did eat the rest of the challah. What I mean is that there is an inyan to eat the 'prusas hamotzi' i.e. the peiece of bread that hamotzi is said on and then eaten from. If a person says hamotzi and then cuts off a piece and eats from the rest, then you end up with a lot of bread that's ...


2

In the sefer Shmiras Haguf Vehanefesh by Rav Yitzchok Lerner, Rav Chaim Kanievsky is quoted saying that there is no source for this in the tradional Jewish literature, but if this is ones family minhag he should not change it. Personally, i have heard from Rav Moshe Heineman of Baltimore and head of the Star K that he himself as a student in Lakewood under ...


2

I once heard the following explanation, although I don't remember where. We have two loaves of Challah on Shabbos to commemorate the double portion of Manna that came down for Shabbos - each morning a portion came for that day's Manna, and on Friday, double fell. So, the Manna for Friday fell, followed by the Manna for Shabbos. Thus, the Manna on the ...


2

The Minchas Yitzchok writes in a responsa (I will try to find the exact one) that he has this tradition, but that he couldn't find a source for it. If he practiced it and tried to source it but couldn't, I would assume there is no real source. Theories to backwards engineer a reason would be a different story though. I myself might post my own Rabbi ...


1

Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner has a nice blog post about it. We want to minimize the interruption between reciting HaMotzi and eating the bread, but we also want to recite the berachah upon a whole loaf, if possible, to show respect for the berachah. So when do we actually cut the bread? Early sources ... felt that cutting the bread does not constitute ...


1

from: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1645/whats-the-origin-of-the-jewish-bread-challah Around the 15th Century, Ashkenazic Jews (in eastern Europe) developed the challah that we have today. It is thought that the braiding or twisting was a pun on twisting off the little piece of first dough as a reminder of the Temple sacrifices. The braided ...



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