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6

Great question. I myself have had this question and looked it up, and I found the article Why Do We Dip the Challah Bread in Salt? to be very interesting. To sum up what's written there: It's dipped in salt every time bread is eaten, and not only shabbos, the reason being your table is compared to an altar, which the sacrifices brought on the altar all had ...


4

The Tur (orach chaim 291) quotes an opinion that 2 loaves are unnecessary for the third meal. The explanation offered is that from the double portion of Friday, four loaves were made. One was consumed on Friday itself, one was consumed on Friday night, and one was consumed at the first daytime meal. This means that only one loaf remained for the third meal. ...


3

Tosefos to Beitza 2b s.v. והיה suggests that whether or not manna fell on Yom Tov is a dispute between conflicting midrashim. One medrash says: ויברך ויקדש ברכו במן וקדשו במן שבשבת לא היה יורד מן אבל בי"ט היה יורד "and He blessed it," "and He sanctified it" - He blessed it with manna and sanctified it with manna, as on Shabbos manna did not come ...


3

from Menachem Mendel: The earliest apparent source for using the term ḥallah in connection with the bread that is eaten on Shabbat can be found in the 15th c. German work Leket Yosher (p. 49) [See John Cooper’s Eat and Be Satisfied: A Social History of Jewish Food]: וזכורני שבכל ע”ש עושין לו ג’ חלות דקות הנילושות בביצים ושמן ומעט מים. וחלה ...


2

from: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1645/whats-the-origin-of-the-jewish-bread-challah Around the 15th Century, Ashkenazic Jews (in eastern Europe) developed the challah that we have today. It is thought that the braiding or twisting was a pun on twisting off the little piece of first dough as a reminder of the Temple sacrifices. The braided ...



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