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15

In Judaism, there are three types of "Grand Festivals" We have what are called the "Shalosh Regalim". These are three holidays where the Jewish people used to all come to Jersulem and are also known as the Pilgramige holidays. Pesach - Passover (Exodus 12:3-51, 23:15, Leviticus 23:4-8, Numbers 28:16-25) Shavuot - Pentecost (Ex.23:16, Lev. 23:15-21, Num. ...


9

You are right as to the reason why we don't have two days of Yom Kippur is because it is dangerous and we don't decree on people decrees that they can't handle. As to the other two, see 9 Days of Chanukah?


9

R' Howard Jachter lays out and analyzes a lot of relevant sources on the Hallel question here. It's worth reading the whole essay; it packs a lot of material into a short piece. His conclusion is: It is difficult to arrive at a definitive conclusion whether one should recite Hallel with a Beracha on Yom Haatzmaut. Hence, most of those who recite Hallel ...


8

The Talmud in Megillah 16b expounds the verse (Esther 8:16) in the following way: לַיְּהוּדִים, הָיְתָה אוֹרָה וְשִׂמְחָה, וְשָׂשֹׂן, וִיקָר The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honour Light = Torah Gladness = Holidays Joy = Brit Milah Honor = Tefillin From this the Maharil (as quoted in the Darkei Moshe OC 693 sk 4) says that one should ...


6

The Rambam rules in Chagigah 2:1 that someone who is tamei is exempt from ri'iyah. A metzora' would seem to be included in this category.


6

Aside from the reasons that Shalom mentioned, the Midrash (Shir Hashirim Rabbah 1:6) states that it's part of the penalty of exile: since we didn't properly keep the one day of Yom Tov in the Land of Israel, we now have to keep two in exile. (In a more positive vein, though, Chassidic writings see this as part of the process of teshuvah - like a rope that ...


5

My understanding is that a community has the right to determine that someone's behavior could be so completely out of line that the person is not to be given any honors in the synagogue, as doing so could be seen as tolerating or endorsing their actions. Excerpt from a Rabbinical Council of America statement: Therefore, be it resolved that we must ...


5

On page 31 of Rabbi Zev Reichman's book based on the shiurim of Rav Moshe Wolfson Shlit"a, Flames of Faith: An Introduction to Chassidic Thought, he quotes Rabbi Isaac Luria (the holy ARI) who says the reason for a second day of yom tov is because anyone who lives inside the land of Israel has an extra soul, and therefore can internalize the holiness of a ...


5

The word mahzor means "cycle" (the root Ħ-Z-R means "to return"). It is applied to the festival prayer book because the festivals recur annually. from Wikipedia


5

Yom Kippur -- they realized that most people can't handle a 48-hr fast, so they didn't enact it. Purim and Chanukah -- came much later in history, and aren't "no-work" holidays. Never mind they're entirely of post-Mosaic origins, which means we're more lenient with them in cases of doubt.


5

Abarbanel explains (in my own loose translation): …and so gave another rule related to Sukos, saying "You shall not boil a kid in its mother's milk".… It seems to me… that idolators would do this when they got together: that is, they'd boil kids in milk when they harvested grain, thinking that they would thereby appeal to their ...


5

Let's denote a year by what day is the first day of Rosh Hashanah and what day is the first day of Pesach. So, for example, "2-3" means Rosh Hashanah on Monday and Pesach on Tuesday. For our purposes, years run from Tishrei through Elul. We have to consider the following yomim tovim: Rosh Hashanah, for which we're provided the day of the week; Yom Kippur, ...


4

I've heard the following explanation, but cannot currently find the source. If anyone knows - please comment. There are opinions that reading ketuvim in public is forbidden on shabbat, at the "time of the beit midrash", so that people will listen to the drasha and not to the reading. See Bavli Shabbat 115a; and Mishne Torah, Laws of Shabbat, chapter 23, ...


4

The Sefer הארות השמש Siman 7 Number 10 says that the difference between Megilas Esther and the other Megilas is that we only do Tadir first when both items are a requirement, and therefore on Purim where Kriyas HaTorah and Kriyas HaMegila are both requirements we do Kriyas Hatorah which is Tadir first. However by the other Megilos where it is not a ...


4

The most complete sourcebook on Yomtov Sheni that I have seen is Rabbi Yerachmiel Fried's "Yomtov Sheini KiHilchasa." Here is a video shiur given by him on the topic .


4

It depends on how you define a "chag,"re. an issuer melacha. It's worth noting that the greeting on Yom Ha'atzmaut is "Moadim LeSimcha liGeulah Shleimah I never quite understood this, but in light of the definition of "chag" as a day on which Melacha is prohibited, perhaps this is the origin of the usage of the phrase Moadim LeSimcha (the greeting for Chol ...


3

The identity of the author is unknown.


3

The earliest source I know of that mentions two days of Yom Tov is the Mishnah (Eruvin 3:8), completed in the late second century. (Though to judge by the mishnayos before and after that, it may be talking about Rosh Hashanah specifically, where the reason we keep two days is somewhat different than for other Yamim Tovim.) Some relevant passages from the ...


3

The Gemara (Pesachim 6a-b) derives the 30-day period from the fact that at the time of the first Pesach in the desert (in the year after the Exodus), Moshe told the people the laws of Pesach Sheni - which occurs one month later. As for the reasoning behind this: R. Schneur Zalman of Liadi (in his Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 429:1) summarizes Beis Yosef and ...


3

We find by the laws of mentioning rain and asking for rain that one who is on doubt if he did or did not do so, if it is after 30 days since the change need not go back. Some hold that a correct habit can be assumed based on how many times one has said it over 30 days (at least 90 times) and others hold it is based on 30 days of practice. According to the ...


3

The Babylonian Talmud just says "well, that's our ancestors' custom, so we keep it." Keep in mind that this source is more interested in HOW the practice came about, rather than WHY. It's been suggested (I believe in the Yerushalmi Talmud) that this arrangement works out because the Jews of Israel can fit enough spirituality into one day of Yom Tov; the ...


3

I've never heard not to use them, though that doesn't necessarily mean it's okay; and I do know that people use the yom tov candles to light stoves. As always, CYLOR.


3

I have a little pamphlet of t'shuvos/analyses by Rav Mirsky that basically concludes that there is, especially fulfillable by feasting and dancing. I will try to locate, quote, and cite it. Update: See Sha'arei T'shuva 529:4 (last one in volume 5) and the sources he cites for related information.


3

In Seder Avodas Yisrael by the ריביא''ד (R' Seligman Baer) זכר צדיק לברכה, there is a big Yotzros Section. For a quite a lot of the days with Yotzros, it includes a piyut in the third Brachah (Ahavah), examples include the six Shabbosos after Pesach, the Shabbos after Shavuos, Shabbos VaYeira, Shlach-Lecha, Chukas, Nachamu and Eikeiv.


2

I certainly don't know "why," but the flow of many piyyutim goes Yotzer-Ofan-Zulat. But not all! See, for example, the piyyutim for Shabbat Chol Hamoed Pesach, where the flow is Yotzer-Ofan-Meorah-Ahavah-Zulat-Geulah. (These piyyutim are in the Rinnat Yisrael machzor, for example, but the ArtScroll machzor doesn't have the Meorah or Ahavah, with a note ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch in OC 100 rules that prior to a holiday one must go over and prepare the text of the prayers so that he is familiar with them. I suggest this is why holiday prayer books are called Machzor from the root Ch.Z.R. which can mean to review or to go over.


2

It's not necessary to keep 2 days for a holiday that is d'rabanan and that has no issur melacha.


2

Sefer Ohr Olam (Mechon Ramchal Yerushalayim) says that on the 17th of Shevat 5491 the Ramchal established the "Chabura Kadisha". Unfortunately, I don't know what that is or why it was deemed so significant as to warrant a holiday to celebrate its founding.


2

My Ba'al Mesorah (my Rav, R' Mordechai Friedman) would offer his children candy for every question that they could come up with. I don't know how well this would work with his children today, as they are mostly grown. He used the example of a politician engaging a reporter at a press conference. The reporter asks a question that he has been itching to ask ...


2

One says Al Hanissim all 8 days of Channukah (ShA OC 682:1). One who does not live in a city walled from the days of Joshua or in Shushan says Al Hanissim on the 14th of Adar (ShA OC 693:2). One who lives in a walled city from the days of Joshua or in Shushan says Al Hanissim on the 15th of Adar, even if it falls on Shabbat when the Megillah is read on ...



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