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16

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


14

I appreciate your dilemma. If the novelty of the approach is what is stirring you today, when it does become familiar and regular to you, no matter what approach it is, it will become boring and uninspiring. There are certain universal principles for growth that you will find in any legitimate approach that can keep the words of Torah "as fresh as the day we ...


14

Anecdotally, I've heard that it is common for shluchim, as one of their first acts upon arrival in a new community, to purchase burial plots for themselves - thus demonstrating that they intend to remain there for the rest of their lives. Most of them do in fact do so. One example is R' Yehuda Leib Raskin, shliach in Casablanca, Morocco, who passed away in ...


13

As I understand it, the markings of these shevas follow the rules given by R' Shlomo Zalman Hanau, an important 18th-century grammarian. In his system, every sheva following a tenuah kallah (a "light" vowel, i.e., one that substitutes for a sheva or a chataf vowel) is vocalized; examples include מַלְכֵי (since the independent form is מְלָכִים) and נֶעֶרְמוּ ...


13

The Shulchan Aruch OC 56:2 says that one says "Amen" after Berich Hu, but the Rema there disagrees and says not to say anything there at all. The Ashkenazim who say Berich Hu at the same time as the Chazzan are following the Taz and the Magen Avraham. Strangely enough, the Shulchan Aruch HaRav also says the same thing. (I haven't seen anyone who follows the ...


13

In general, I wouldn't post just a quote, but it so perfectly addressed the question... From Hayom Yom (29th of first Adar), written/compiled by the Lubavitcher Rebbe: In responding to L'chayim there are two versions: L'chayim Tovim Ul'Shalom, "for good life, and for peace." The reason for this blessing is that the first time drinking wine is ...


13

Let me break this down by question: 1. Are there any documented halachik authorities that rule that the belief in a dead Messiah is beyond the pale of permitted Jewish belief and therefore would qualify as Kfira? Short Answer: Yes -- and we do consideer it kfira in the case of Jews who adopt Christianity. Rabbi Gil Student, in his book Can The Rebbe ...


12

This custom is known as gebrochts (Yiddish for "broken"); or "matza shruya" (soaked matza) in modern Hebrew. It's prevalent in many Hassidic and Hassidically-influenced communities, though many first encounter it with Lubavitch. The custom arose out of concern that there may be a packet of dry flour in your matza. If that flour never reacted with water, ...


12

Yours should be a journey of discovery, not simple menu selection. With time and investigation, you will find which of the two options you gravitate towards. I would recommend spending some time with each group (not concurrently), learning the respective Chassidus of each, experiencing how the Chassidim interact among themselves and with others outside of ...


12

There is a Chabad way of learning Gemara, as described by the Rebbe Rashab, the 5th Lubavitcher Rebbe and founder of Yeshivat Tomchei Temimim. In his Kuntres Eitz Chayim, he explains why it is necessary to learn Chassidus in addition to learning Gemara properly. The entire text is available online in English. From the introduction to the english ...


12

Chabad-Strashelye was started by R' Aharon Strashelye after the passing of the Alter Rebbe, the first Chabad Rebbe, due to different ideas of how to practice the teachings of Chabad. According to the Wikipedia article: After Rabbi Aharon died, his son[who?] became Rebbe in his place. However, the dynasty did not last into the next generation. Many ...


12

The oldest reference to this tradition that I am aware of is the Taz ("Turei Zahav"), by David haLevi Segal, 17th c. הלוחש על המכה או על החולה ורוקק ואחר כך קורא פסוק מן התורה אין לו חלק לעוה"ב One who whispers over a wound or over a sick person and who spits, and who then recites a verse from the Torah has no portion in the world to come. ...


12

There most certainly is machlokes. Some matters are by already decided by the Rabbeim, etc., but some are a machlokes about what the Rabbeim decided, some are decided by well respected Rabbanim within Chabad (like Rabbi Avraham Chaim Naeh) and some are just a question for a Rav, not having a previous answer, or that are heavily dependent on circumstances. ...


11

Rabbi Aharon Feldman, Rosh Yeshiva of Ner Israel Rabbinical College, wrote a responsum regarding how to interact with Meshichistim (defined by him as anyone who believes that R Menachem Mendel Schneerson Zichrono Livracha will be resurrected to become the promised Messiah). He writes that they are not considered heretics, and thus their testimony in ...


11

There are, perhaps, several factors to consider: In Chabad thought, the rebbe is more than just a leader, Torah teacher, spiritual guide, etc. All of these roles, and many more, are outgrowths and expressions of his being the נשמה כללית, the "all-encompassing soul" of the Jewish people (see Tanya, ch. 2). Now, of course, barring an explicit statement by ...


10

A couple of other possibilities: "the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l (or some other appropriate honorific)" - my preferred form on this site and elsewhere "the late Lubavitcher Rebbe" In conversation with non-Lubavitchers, "the Lubavitcher Rebbe" is probably unequivocal enough for most purposes (and in conversation among Lubavitchers, "the Rebbe"). It's much the ...


10

There is a booklet called Minhagei Melech that purports to collect all of the Lubavitcher Rebbe's customs; it states (pp. 28 and 34) that he indeed repeated the word with both vocalizations. However: It's questionable how reliable these reports are (not just the ones in MM, but more generally, oral descriptions of what the Rebbe said or did); in some ...


10

Only Ashkenazic communities read all five megillos in a public setting over the course of the year. Sefardic and Chassidic communities generally will only read Eicha on Tisha B'av and (of course) Esther on Purim, but not the other three on the shalosh regalim. The custom to read Ruth on Shavuos (as well as Shir Hashirim on Pesach, I think) is mentioned ...


9

Since no one seems to have answered the last question, namely, are there any Chabad commentaries on the Gemara.... There are many talks and writings from all the Lubavitcher Rebbeim on different topics in Gemara. As far as I know, there is no one systematic commentary on the Gemara, and as their discussions of Gemara topics are usually (though not always) ...


9

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


9

I don't know whether he personally did, but he does mention this custom in his siddur, and gives the Zohar as the source. (It states that the seated part of davening corresponds to the shel yad, and the standing part - primarily Shemoneh Esrei, I guess - to the shel rosh.) Dayan Raskin, in his notes to the siddur there, has an extensive discussion of this ...


9

Rabbi Hershel Welcher was asked this question, and he referenced a quote from one of Rambam's letters about someone who was believed to be the messiah, then died; "some were crazy enough to think he was still the messiah after he died." Rabbi Welcher thus ruled that someone who believes a dead man is the messiah is not idolatrous nor an apostate -- he's just ...


9

The Rebbe Rashab founded Yeshivas Tomchei Tmimim, whose purpose was that in it should be learned “G-d’s Torah, the exoteric and the esoteric, as a whole.” That is why the Yeshivah was called “Tomchei Tmimim,” and its students called Tmimim (Tmimim — plural of “tomim” meaning whole) — for there the synthesis of the exoteric and esoteric was manifest. ...


8

First ascertain for yourself what exactly caused you to grow disillusioned with your previous path. You may have already rationalized this, but it might deserve another look. If there are underlying issues behind it, you'll solve nothing by moving along to another path. Spend some time thinking about your life. Get in touch with your emotions and try to ...


8

When a certain Chabad family in Detroit wanted to send their son to Rav Bakst's yeshiva, Rav Bakst felt that because of the derech halimud (style of learning) of what the boy had experienced in a previous Chabad yeshiva, which was more about learning up the texts (girsadige) he would not do well in his regular misnagdishe-litvishe yeshiva. The family did not ...


8

We do see that the Maggid entrusted R' Shneur Zalman with certain special tasks, such as the writing of an "updated" Shulchan Aruch, and the design of letterforms for STaM that would satisfy both the halachic (Beis Yosef) and kabbalistic (Arizal) opinions. The Maggid also gave him the title of "our Rav." As far as I know, these facts are not in dispute, not ...


8

Two stories explaining why the Alter Rebbe included V'shomru in his siddur: R' Avraham Chaim Na'ah, in his sefer Piskei Hasidur (paragraph 128), brings a story Chassidim would tell. Levi Yitzchok of Berditchev once asked the Alter Rebbe why his custom is not to say V'shomru, if it makes such a "יריד"‬ (usually translated as fair, or parade) in heaven. The ...


8

Actually, I don't know why you'd have to ask specifically about the USSR. Wouldn't the same question apply to any feudal-type government, where the king is in principle the owner of all of the land in the kingdom? And AFAIK there's no concept in halachah that you have to ask him for permission to build a sukkah. I think the reason might be, building on ...


8

It looks like a general Chassidic custom. The Minchas Elazar writes that it is a tradition from the Ba'al Shem Tov. He explains the mishna that says that one stays is "comparable to a slave who mixes wine for his master and he spills it in his face." in a novel way. He says that there are two ways to explain "he spills in his face", is it the master ...


8

The Aruch Hashulchan explains that one could add Hadasim and Aravos because the Torah doesn't say how many Hadasim or Aravos to have, it just used a plural form for "Arvei Nachal" and "Anfei Eitz Avos". Therefore one can add more Hadasim or Aravos for beauty. Though Lubavitch custom is to add Hadasim but not Aravos.



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