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To summarize this book: Rabbi Moshe Sofer considers it an unacceptable attempt to emulate the gentiles. (Responsa Bet Shearim, YD No. 402). In a similar vein, R. David Tzvi Hoffman cites Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (in Shut Malmad Lehoil Part II YD Number 109) opined that putting flowers on a grave is forbidden as imitation of non-Jewish practices. ...


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Shaar Breslav contains the teaching from: לקוטי מוהר"ן תורה קח that מקום גניזת הצדיקים קדוש בקדושת ארץ ישראל The Rebbe quoted the possuk "צדיקים ירשו ארץ" as an indication that the tzaddikim inherited their burial place to sanctify it with the holiness of Eretz Yisroel. The site quotes the שדי חמד" מערכת ארץ ישראל א" that it is a great mitzvah to ...


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The concept of the unveiling stems from the need to mark the clearly mark the grave-site. Removing the cloth from stone symbolizes erecting the tombstone. Making sure that the grave-site is marked properly is a form of honoring the deceased. In this sense, it would appear that removing the cloth is a similar gesture to placing a stone on the grave-site (a ...


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The newer Madrikh, by Rabbi Bulka, says the point is for the family to get together to make sure the tombstone is properly in-place (hence the Hebrew term, "hakamat matzeiva"); he then says the "unveiling" practice, whereby the stone is first covered by a cloth and then given a dramatic reveal, "has no basis in Jewish practice whatsoever." (Me: yet it ...



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