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A calendar is important for the dead - this way the living can figure out when their Yarzheit is, and say Kaddish and learn as a Zechus for the Neshama.


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Encyclopedia Judaica's entry for "Hamadan, Iran" says: The Persian Jews identify Hamadan with "Shushan ha-Bira," which obviously is a mistake. An essay entitled "Esther’s Tomb Iran's Jewish queen defies decay and dissolution." by the Diarna Project offers an alternative explanation for the tradition that the tomb is in Hamadan: Mount Alvand, which ...


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From Chabad.org The basic grave formation in most cemeteries is arranged according to families. There has been a custom in later centuries, observed by many memorial societies, of burying men and women in separate sections. Neither custom is obligatory. One should make inquiry regarding this procedure before one joins the society, in order to avoid ...


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To summarize this book: Rabbi Moshe Sofer considers it an unacceptable attempt to emulate the gentiles. (Responsa Bet Shearim, YD No. 402). In a similar vein, R. David Tzvi Hoffman cites Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (in Shut Malmad Lehoil Part II YD Number 109) opined that putting flowers on a grave is forbidden as imitation of non-Jewish practices. ...


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Radak citing Yonatan, Ralbag, and Metzudot David (Samuel 1:25:29) all interpret it as a reference to meriting Olam HaBa. (It seems to me that even those who read the verse there in accordance with its straightforward meaning would agree that the intended reference on tombstones is to this Drash.)


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Kehilas Menachem page 203 quoting Shaagas Aryeh Hachadoshos page 61 says the first step is to set up a group of people that will bury the dead - also known as a Chevra Kadisha. They should fast on a Monday & Thursday, say Selichos, pray for Rachamim. Then they should purchase property specifically for the purpose of a Bais Hakvoros. Later he talks ...


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Nitei Gavriel - Aveilus 2 67:3 says that after searching in all the Sefarim of many different Kehilos, Chevra Kadishas, and Aveilus, he could not find a source for an unveiling. He mentions on the bottom that the Steipler was once discussing this with his son Reb Chaim Kanievsky, and he said that it is most likely not of Jewish origin.


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Nitei Gavriel Aveilus2 67:20 only mentions placing a stone or some grass on the gravestone. There is no mention of a preference as to where the stone comes from. This leads me to believe that there is no preferred option.


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Daily Halacha brings this in the name of Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid and says that this restriction is Kabalistic. Nitei Gavriel - Aveilus2 88:1:1 mentions this in the name of Magein Avraham 581:16 quoting the Arizal, Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid 12, Shela, Elya Raba 224:7, Rabbi Akiva Eiger 376 and others. In note 2 he brings a possible reason from Damesek Eliezer. ...


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You asked: How is this done? Do you dig up the earth to a certain depth? Do you dig a trench? Do you dig holes at certain intervals? It's a Mishna in Ohalot 16:4 which says: הַבּוֹדֵק, בּוֹדֵק אַמָּה עַל אַמָּה וּמַנִּיחַ אַמָּה, עַד שֶׁהוּא מַגִּיעַ לְסֶלַע אוֹ לִבְתוּלָה.‏ You check by drilling 1-Amah holes at 1-Amah intervals. They are reach ...


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A search online shows that funeral homes' giving out calendars is not a Jewish thing. (And the question of why funeral homes in general give out calendars is off-topic on this site.)


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Non-Jews can come to the service at the cemetery to honor the person. So I would presume they can come be in the cemetery as long as they ask at the front for any respectful instructions (such as walkable areas.) Non-Jews as well as Jews visit the famous graves of patriarchs and matriarchs in Israel. Hope that helps.


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Shaar Breslav contains the teaching from: לקוטי מוהר"ן תורה קח that מקום גניזת הצדיקים קדוש בקדושת ארץ ישראל The Rebbe quoted the possuk "צדיקים ירשו ארץ" as an indication that the tzaddikim inherited their burial place to sanctify it with the holiness of Eretz Yisroel. The site quotes the שדי חמד" מערכת ארץ ישראל א" that it is a great mitzvah to ...


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It comes from Avigail and is the opposite of כף הקלע. The Pasuk in Shmuel says וְֽהָיְתָה֩ נֶ֨פֶשׁ אֲדֹנִ֜י צְרוּרָ֣ה ׀ בִּצְר֣וֹר הַחַיִּ֗ים אֵ֚ת ה' אלקיך וְאֵ֨ת נֶ֤פֶשׁ אֹיְבֶ֙יךָ֙ יְקַלְּעֶ֔נָּה בְּת֖וֹךְ כַּ֥ף הַקָּֽלַע׃ This juxtaposition makes it look like it is referring to rest as opposed to being flung about. Tzror would mean a bond, held ...


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The newer Madrikh, by Rabbi Bulka, says the point is for the family to get together to make sure the tombstone is properly in-place (hence the Hebrew term, "hakamat matzeiva"); he then says the "unveiling" practice, whereby the stone is first covered by a cloth and then given a dramatic reveal, "has no basis in Jewish practice whatsoever." (Me: yet it ...



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