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7

Anything which can contract impurity cannot block impurity from passing through it (Megillah 26b, Shulchan Aruch YD 371:1). A vessel can only contract impurity if it is made from cloth, sackcloth, leather, bone, wood, metal, or earthenware (Rambam Keilim 1:1, see Leviticus 11:32-33 and Numbers 31:22). Plastic therefore cannot contract impurity, so it can ...


4

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems. However, he writes, this is not strictly a violation of consulting with the dead (see Deut. 18:11) since the communication is understood to go only one-way.


3

Before Rosh Hashanah, and especially on the day before the holiday begins, it is a long-standing custom to visit gravesites and to exhort the tzadikim there to intercede for us on the day of judgement. However, we do not direct our prayers toward the dead who rest there; rather, we implore G-d to have mercy on us for their sake. (Kitzur Shulchan ...


3

See שו"ת שואל ומשיב מהדו"ג ח"ב סי' מג, who addresses this issue--seemingly there is a problem of אהל זרוק לא שמיה אהל, which would mean that the train would not "interrupt" the טומאה. However, the שואל ומשיב says that something which is made to move would be considered an אהל, in which case the train would be block the טומאה. The חזון איש יו"ד סי' ריא ...


3

YU Torah online has an extensive document on death and mourning. In Section 12, 36 קבורת משומד it quotes a. Iggros Moshe – he deals with a woman who converted to Christian Science. The question is if she can be buried in a Jewish cemetery. i. We can’t say that she was “crazy” because even though all forms of Avodah Zarah are crazy they are ...


2

See Sanhedrin 47a with Rishonim, especially Ramban. Exhaustive treatment of the subject may be found in these two issues of דף קשר הר עציון. A detailed overview of the prohibition by Rabbi Avihud Schwartz In summary: The gemara applies the rule of אין קוברים צדיק אצל רשע only to people executed by beis din. There is a machloket RaMBaM and RaMBaN which is ...


2

I heard this morning from Rabbi Shmuel Tendler Shlita - Rabbi of Sons of Israel in Lakewood, that the word Even is an acronym for Av, Ben, Neked or alternatively Eim, Bas, Nekda. That is why we place a stone as we are saying we are a continuation of you. (This only explains why one would place on the grave of a parent or grandparent)


2

There are 4 questions here: 1) over, 2) through, 3) under and 4) a train that has traversed a cemetery The Kohen's Handbook by Rabbi Yochanan-Alexander-Lombard says on page 63: An object that is not susceptible to tuma and is not a person or a utensil and is not resting on one, blocks tuma from spreading through it. …. I guess that a railway track ...


1

In Shulchan Aruch there is no mention of days that one cannot visit a cemetery. There are Halachot that apply when visiting a cemetery on various days. For example, when entering a cemetery - after not being there for 30 days - one says a Bracha. See here or here for Nusach. One then continues with Tziduk Hadin - which is not said on days when Tachanun is ...


1

I believe that there is not. Common practice in the Temple era (and earlier) was to place bodies in caves and let the bodies decompose down to the bones, which were then collected and placed in the family tomb. No actual burial was done. However, I have not learned the relevant halakhot, so I'm not sure if what was done in that era is still halakhically ...


1

Even if we were to assume that plastic is not Mekabel Tum'ah according to what the Rambam writes in Hilchos Tum'as Meis 13:3&4 it would not help to block the Tum'ah. Halacha 3: These substances convey ritual impurity and intervene in the face of it: over sized wooden vessels, keilim made from stone, animal turds, or earth that are over sized, simple ...



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