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7

The source of the name Maaras Hamachpeila could shed some light on this question. - According to one opinion in Eiruvin 53a, either Rav or Shmuel (the Gemara doesn't say which one said it) says the cave is named because it is "doubled with couples" i.e. there are many couples there. This would seem to imply that its main significance is who is buried there. ...


7

Orach Chaim 224:12 Beer Haitaiv 8 says the reason that either grass or stone is placed on the grave is as a honor for the person buried there, as it shows that people came to his grave. There is no mention as to placing more than or less than one.


6

Chayim K'halacha question 223 - Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Blizinsky - says a Kohain may go on the paths that lead to Auschwitz however may not enter the area where the incinerators are.


4

In order to prevent Tuma from rising, you need a Tefach space covered by a roof. To achieve this for a bridge, you use the כיפין על גבי כיפין concept, as described by the Para Aduma ceremony, where they had a bridge from the Temple Mount to Har Hazeitim: מסכת פרה - פרק ג - משנה ו וְכֶבֶשׁ הָיוּ עוֹשִׂים מֵהַר הַבַּיִת לְהַר הַמִּשְׁחָה, כִּפִּין ...


4

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems. However, he writes, this is not strictly a violation of consulting with the dead (see Deut. 18:11) since the communication is understood to go only one-way.


3

Before Rosh Hashanah, and especially on the day before the holiday begins, it is a long-standing custom to visit gravesites and to exhort the tzadikim there to intercede for us on the day of judgement. However, we do not direct our prayers toward the dead who rest there; rather, we implore G-d to have mercy on us for their sake. (Kitzur Shulchan ...


3

See שו"ת שואל ומשיב מהדו"ג ח"ב סי' מג, who addresses this issue--seemingly there is a problem of אהל זרוק לא שמיה אהל, which would mean that the train would not "interrupt" the טומאה. However, the שואל ומשיב says that something which is made to move would be considered an אהל, in which case the train would be block the טומאה. The חזון איש יו"ד סי' ריא ...


3

YU Torah online has an extensive document on death and mourning. In Section 12, 36 קבורת משומד it quotes a. Iggros Moshe – he deals with a woman who converted to Christian Science. The question is if she can be buried in a Jewish cemetery. i. We can’t say that she was “crazy” because even though all forms of Avodah Zarah are crazy they are ...


2

See Sanhedrin 47a with Rishonim, especially Ramban. Exhaustive treatment of the subject may be found in these two issues of דף קשר הר עציון. A detailed overview of the prohibition by Rabbi Avihud Schwartz In summary: The gemara applies the rule of אין קוברים צדיק אצל רשע only to people executed by beis din. There is a machloket RaMBaM and RaMBaN which is ...


2

After Rav Avrohom Azulai (1570-1643) in his sefer Chesed L'Avrohom explains that the lower Garden of Eden is entered by way of the Garden, and that both the Garden and Gehinom - the dwelling place of harmful creatures and angels of destruction - are located on the north side of this lowly world, he writes: Because it is difficult for both the living and ...


2

I heard this morning from Rabbi Shmuel Tendler Shlita - Rabbi of Sons of Israel in Lakewood, that the word Even is an acronym for Av, Ben, Neked or alternatively Eim, Bas, Nekda. That is why we place a stone as we are saying we are a continuation of you. (This only explains why one would place on the grave of a parent or grandparent)


2

There are 4 questions here: 1) over, 2) through, 3) under and 4) a train that has traversed a cemetery The Kohen's Handbook by Rabbi Yochanan-Alexander-Lombard says on page 63: An object that is not susceptible to tuma and is not a person or a utensil and is not resting on one, blocks tuma from spreading through it. …. I guess that a railway track ...


1

Nit'e Gavriel, Mourning volume 2, chapter 87, paragraphs 11–12 (page 669): It's forbidden to tread on graves. However, if one needs to walk to a certain grave and has no path [thither] unless he treads on graves, it's permitted. [If] people are visiting graves and it's no longer possible to recognize the form of a grave, especially in old ...


1

In Shulchan Aruch there is no mention of days that one cannot visit a cemetery. There are Halachot that apply when visiting a cemetery on various days. For example, when entering a cemetery - after not being there for 30 days - one says a Bracha. See here or here for Nusach. One then continues with Tziduk Hadin - which is not said on days when Tachanun is ...



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