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10

if she confesses she won't be put to death by Beis Din since you need 2 witnesses for that. and if there are 2 witnesses then she won't be tested by the sota water, hence there are not 2 witnesses. therefore, she would be saving her life from the water by confessing and would not be executed by beis din.


8

This blessing was instituted in the days of Raban Gamliel when the Jewish heretics (saducees, etc.) of the time posed a direct threat to the nation, the blessing was instituted as an anti-missionary move. http://www.ou.org/torah/taryag/shemoneh_esrei_12


7

According to this article, 40 years before the destruction of the Temple: Instructive though this is, it is merely an academic discussion, the right of imposing capital punishment having been taken from the Sanhedrin by the Romans a century before, "40 years before the Destruction of the Temple" (Sanh. 41a; TJ, Sanh. 1:18a). The rabbis agreed that with ...


7

The Gemara says that a non-Jew is liable to death for stealing less than a penny. "אמר רבי חייא בר אבא אמר רבי יוחנן בן נח נהרג על פחות משוה פרוטה ולא ניתן להשבון" The Rambam agrees.


5

The Talmud in tractate Sanhedrin (Yerushalmi 7:4 Bavli 52b) asks this question. Two answers are given: 1) Rav Yoshiya: Since it is unspecified, it must be the easiest (קל) of deaths. (The Bavli explains this means the easiest of the four deaths known through tradition, following the opinion of the Sages (Mishna Sanhedrin 7:1) that strangulation is the ...


5

The Rambam writes: 40 years before the destruction of the Temple, capital punishment was nullified among the Jewish people. Although the Temple was still standing, since the Sanhedrin went into exile and were not in their place in the Temple, these laws could not be enforced. The destruction of the temple was around 70 CE (I believe the Rambam puts it ...


4

Gersonides (Ralbag) is puzzled by this. He offers two answers. The first is that the children were minors, and that they consequently came under the category of Achen's property, with regard to the punishment. We must then say that the verse in Deuteronomy takes apllies only once the child becomes an adult by Jewish Law. This would appear consistent with the ...


4

According to Rashi they were not killed. In his commentary to Joshua 7:24, Rashi writes that they were taken to see in order that they not copy his actions. Verse 25 says "וירגמו אותו" - they stoned him, in singular. "וישרפו אותם", they burned them, in plural, Rashi says refers to the tent and other property. "ויסלקו אותם" - they stoned them in plural, ...


3

From myjewishlearning.com According to the Mishnah (Sanhedrin 1:4) the death penalty could only be inflicted, after trial, by a court composed of twenty-three judges and there were four types of death penalties (Sanhedrin 7:1): stoning, burning, slaying (by the sword), and strangling. A bare reading of these and the other accounts in the tractate would ...


3

I found two possible answers that are at odds with one another: 1. We know Ishmael repented in the lifetime of Abraham, since he allowed Isaac to precede him for Abraham's burial, (Gen 25:9, see also B. Bath. 16b). Pirkei D'Rebbi Eliezer, ch. 30 relates the following, which could suggest that his repentance happened in the desert: "In the merit of Abraham, ...


2

In ancient times, the two stages of effectuating a marriage were separate (Qiddushin/Nissuin). The first stage Qiddushin - it is often translated as "betrothal" however it is of greater significance than the English word connotes. Once Qiddushin has taken place, the couple are fully married - they simply have not yet been intimate with one another (this ...


2

Yevamot 34b explains it thus: מיתיבי כל עשרים וארבעה חדש דש מבפנים וזורה מבחוץ דברי ר' אליעזר א"ל הללו אינו אלא כמעשה ער ואונן כמעשה ער ואונן ולא כמעשה ער ואונן כמעשה ער ואונן דכתיב והיה אם בא אל אשת אחיו ושחת ארצה ולא כמעשה ער ואונן דאילו התם שלא כדרכה והכא כדרכה בשלמא אונן דכתיב ביה ושחת ארצה Soncino translation, my notes in braces: An objection ...


1

I believe the text implies that it was against Roman law for them to perform an execution. It says that they were testing him: "They were saying this, testing Him, so that they might have grounds for accusing Him..." (John 8:6a). If he said it was wrong to stone her, then he was violating the law passed down from Moses and could be labeled as a false ...


1

NO. King Saul appears to have wanted to die rather than fall into the hands of the Philistines, because of what they would have done to him -- and how that would have destroyed the morale of the Jewish people. (And that's not halachically so clear either.) But that's not your question. Achitofel hanged himself so his family would inherit his estate, ...


1

There are different types of execution to highlight the various severities of the sin for which the sinner is being executed for. As the Rambam writes (הלכות סנהדרין פרק יד): סקילה חמורה מן השריפה, ושריפה חמורה מן הסיף, והסיף חמור מן החנק. "Stoning is more severe than burning, burning is more severe than beheading, beheading is more sever than ...


1

Likely not. The responsibility to punish seems to be communal - to put the person to death "so that others may hear about it & be afraid" - or an obligation of the court or king. It doesn't seem to be a personal obligation. As 1040 said though, there seems to be aspects of atonement; for example, the condemned is expected to repent before we exact the ...



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