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Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. It has nothing to do with yahrtzeit or any occasion other than praying, itself. I located the reason for this custom in this article: The Shulchan ...


5

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


2

During candle lighting she should be thinking about fulfilling the Mitzva of honouring the Shabbat by creating a brighter room. After she has extinguished the match, covered her eyes, made the Bracha and then looked at the candles and accepted Shabbat, she may want to use this auspicious time to pray for whatever she feels needs to be prayed for. The ...


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The following is from Aish: After the recitation, many take special time to thank God for the many blessings of health, prosperity, and joy in their lives. There is also a special prayer composed by women, for women, which many include at this time: May it be Your will, Lord my God and God of my fathers, to be gracious to me (and to my ...


1

I think that you are confusing two things. While my wife does say something after saying the bracha (I will get that and add it to the answer), closing the eyes is not part of concentrating or saying something other than the bracha. There is another reason for a woman to close her eyes at the lighting of the candles for Shabbos. Technically, she should ...



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