Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. (Some places use electric "candles"; others use wax. I prefer the wax, though it is a bit more dangerous, smelly, and messy.) It has nothing to do with ...


9

Men and women are both obligated in the Mitzva of Shabbat candles and saying the blessing. Women have precedence to ensure the Mitzva is fulfilled because they are more often at home preparing the house on Friday afternoon. (Shulchan Aruch OC 263:2-5 and Mishne Torah, Hilchos shabas ch. 5)


7

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


7

According to Rabbi Shlomo Fisher on ohr.edu, someone flying is exempt from lighting, because the rule is one candle per household ("נר איש וביתו;" Shabbos 21b); and if there's no one at home then there is no obligation to light.


7

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


5

The Sefer Piskei Tshuvos siman 263:10 writes that if a man lights he makes the bracha first because he is not mekabel shabbas with his lighting(unless he wants to take shabbas in with lighting,then he should light first). See footnote 32 which brings sources such as Eishel Avraham and the Aruch Hashulchan seif 13,there is an opnion brought in the footnote ...


4

This, according to Halachipedia: A wedding on Chanukah If the wedding takes place at night then the groom fulfills his obligation with the lighting in his father's house which took place before the wedding. [35] If the wedding takes place during the day before sunset, the groom [...] doesn't fulfill his obligation with the lighting in his ...


4

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


4

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


4

The following is from Aish: After the recitation, many take special time to thank God for the many blessings of health, prosperity, and joy in their lives. There is also a special prayer composed by women, for women, which many include at this time: May it be Your will, Lord my God and God of my fathers, to be gracious to me (and to my ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch writes (263:12) that if one is a member of a community/congregation that accepts Shabbos early, he must accept Shabbos early along with them. This is true even if the person doesn't actually daven along with that congregation, and is determined by the time that the shul recite Mizmor Shir (M.B. 261:31). This applies even applies to a ...


3

It would seem that a woman does not need to follow her husband's minhagim for things that are considered ladies' mitzvos. Thus R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe EH 2:12) writes that it is up to a woman if she wants to wear a sheital (wig), and she doesn't need to follow her husband if he feels it's not good enough as this is one of her mitzvos. Rabbi Doniel ...


3

Rav Moshe Feinstein: One does not recite a blessing. Rav Aharon Lichtenstein: One does recite a blessing. Both rabbis agree that one can use incandescent (preferably unfrosted) light bulbs in a "pressing situation," (eg. fire hazard, or you don't have candles). Ask your rabbi for practical applications. Regarding the second part of your question: ...


3

A shiur by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz that I listened to recently, but can't seem to find just now, notes that one option, recommended by Rabbi Baruch Simon, is that the person can light a flashlight on the plane. It has batteries present, so that is better than the usual electric menorah which relies on a power source that is not present (a power plant far ...


2

Often, when someone comes to a synagogue to pray who never does otherwise, and it's not a red-letter day on the calendar, it's because he's commemorating a relative's yahrzeit that day and wants to be with a minyan to say kadish. I propose that the rabbi assumed that about you. Many have the custom of lighting a candle on a relative's yahrzeit.


2

During candle lighting she should be thinking about fulfilling the Mitzva of honouring the Shabbat by creating a brighter room. After she has extinguished the match, covered her eyes, made the Bracha and then looked at the candles and accepted Shabbat, she may want to use this auspicious time to pray for whatever she feels needs to be prayed for. The ...


2

The conclusion of the Shulchan Aruch (263:10) is that you can light candles without accepting Shabbos through that lighting if you have that intention when lighting. This intention does not need to be expressed (Rama there). You should still make a beracha when lighting in this situation (Mishna Berura 263:42). It would therefore be better to daven with a ...


1

I think that you are confusing two things. While my wife does say something after saying the bracha (I will get that and add it to the answer), closing the eyes is not part of concentrating or saying something other than the bracha. There is another reason for a woman to close her eyes at the lighting of the candles for Shabbos. Technically, she should ...


1

The source for this entire question is the Remo (based on the Mordechai and the Maharil) in Shulcahn Aruch Orach Chaim 263:5 who says: הגה: יֵשׁ מִי שֶׁאוֹמֵר שֶׁמְּבָרְכִין קֹדֶם הַהַדְלָקָה, וְיֵשׁ מִי שֶׁאוֹמֵר שֶׁמְּבָרֵךְ אַחַר הַהַדְלָקָה (מָרְדְּכַי סוֹף ב''מ), וּכְדֵי שֶׁיְּהֵא עוֹבֵר לַעֲשִׂיָּתוֹ לֹא יֵהָנֶה מִמֶּנָּה עַד לְאַחַר הַבְּרָכָה, ...


1

I do not have a copy of Igros Moshe with me so this is from memory. However, I looked it every summer for several years. Rav Moshe Feinstein paskens that bringing in Shabbos early is an individual decision. In fact, a wife can delay lighting candles until the actual zman even if her husband has gone to the "early minyon". He deals with the cases of the ...


1

Two reasons are given for lighting shabbat candles: Shalom Bayit Oneg Shabbat Since the light source of a bulb fulfills both these criteria, it should theoretically be permissable. Most Poskim do, however, make a distinction between battery powered lights and alternative current lights that run from a power outlet. Since the former runs on battery ...


1

Source article: http://www.torahmusings.com/2014/12/guests-travelers-chanukah/ First of all, as the question assumes, there is an obligation for a traveler to light candles (Shabbos daf 21, Shulḥan Arukh 677:1). If the traveler's wife will be lighting for him in his house, the custom of the Sefardim (see Beis Yosef there) would be for the guest not to light ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible