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13

Yes, we always light Shabbat candles, and at the usual time (non-primary source). The only time a holiday affects candle-lighting is that on the second day of a two-day holiday, so long as the second day is not also Shabbat, you don't light the second-day candles until dark so as not to encroach the first day. For Shabbat immediately after a holiday, or ...


10

There's an article on the subject at Hirhurim, by Rabbi Ari Enkin. He cites two reasons that are given for the 18-minute figure: It's based on a Gemara in Shabbos (35b), where it says that six shofar blasts were blown to announce that Shabbos will be starting soon; the third one is the signal for lighting candles, then "he waits as much time as it takes to ...


10

There seem to be different views. On the one hand Chabad are solidly in favour, see here. A reason is suggested why the custom is not prevalent. On the other, Rabbi Eli Mansour at dailyhalacha.com says “…Therefore, the prevalent practice is that the unmarried daughters living in the home do not light Shabbat candles, and instead rely on the mother’s ...


10

Of course, as the comment notes, consult your local Orthodox rabbi. But see here for a halacha sheet shown before and approved by Rav Shternbuch: If one’s wife is not home must the husband light the candles? Seeing that men are obligated to light Shabbos candles as much as women are, if the wife is not present it is up to the husband to light the ...


9

The oldest source I could find is the Likutei MaHarich - (110 years ago). I recall hearing that the custom started, since the Halacha is that if the lady forgot to light one week she has to add a candle in future weeks, often when a lady gave birth they were busy and forgot. (Childbirth was not as easy years ago). Due to this they added a candle and today it ...


8

This custom is mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch (OC 610:1). It is supposed to serve as a reminder to avoid marital relations on Yom Kippur. It is common to allow at least some light into the bedroom: see "The Laws of Lighting Candles for Yom Kippur" by R' Yosef Zimbal.


8

Men and women are both obligated in the Mitzva of Shabbat candles and saying the blessing. Women have precedence to ensure the Mitzva is fulfilled because they are more often at home preparing the house on Friday afternoon. (Shulchan Aruch OC 263:2-5 and Mishne Torah, Hilchos shabas ch. 5)


7

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


6

In SA OC Siman 263 M"A Sif-Katan 12 he writes that if one makes the bracha before lighting (on Shabbos) then that's considered to be "Kabbalas Shabbos" and it's then ossur to light candles. However he then says if that's the case ("v'im cain"), then on Yom Tov one should make the bracha and then light. (Since there is no problem of lighting a candle on yom ...


6

The reason why we light candles a few minutes early (18 minutes) is in order to avoid any possibility of starting Shabbat late. Think of it as a train leaving the station. If you're one minute late, you missed it. By the way, though most communities light Shabbat candles 18 minutes before sunset, local custom may vary. For instance in Jerusalem, the custom ...


6

Say it only during kiddush. The women too should only say it during kiddush. Why would one assume the two would be any different? They are both obligated in kiddush and both obligated to have the lights lit. The Talmud in Sukkah (47b) implies already that the shehechiyanu is said with the kiddush. (The Tur OC 519 deems it an "enactment of [the sages] to say ...


5

To supplement, not supplant, WAF's good answer, which indicated that the reason for two candles is that they correspond to "זכור" and "שמור", I'll note that on holidays two are lit also, corresponding to man and woman. (I don't pretend to understand this correspondence, but that's what Taame Haminhagim 260 says, citing the Eliyahu Raba. He (TH, in the ...


5

The purpose of lighting is to prepare for shabas in a respectable way and provide visibility during the night. The former is a fulfillment of the rabbinic requirement to "honor" shabas, and the latter is a fulfillment of the rabbinic requirement to "enjoy" shabas. Notably for both of these considerations, the Ramba"m states that the requirement is "that a ...


5

If she just lit them but didn't yet say the bracha, and it's still before sunset, she hasn't yet accepted Shabbat. So relight them and then make the bracha. If she already made the bracha but it's still before sunset, she can't relight them because she accepted Shabbat. But if her husband is still home and hasn't accepted Shabbat yet for himself (he ...


5

See the fuller question for far more. But for a quick answer on Barrow specifically, here's the Star-K: WINTER: For example, in Barrow located at the northern tip of Alaska, on December 1 the sun does not rise. However, at 1:15 p.m. there is the most sunlight of the day 30 (theoretical chatzos hayom [=noon]). Therefore, one may daven Shachris and ...


5

This is mentioned in the following places. Darchei Moshe 263:1, Rama 1, Shulchan Aruch HaRav 1, Chayai Adam Shabbos 5:13, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 75:14, Aruch HaShulchan 11, Kaf HaChaim 10. If she forgot many times then she adds for each time she forgot Magen Avraham 3, Shulchan Aruch Harav 1, Chayai Adam ibid, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 75:14, Mishnah Berurah 7, ...


5

I can't say I've ever seen this practiced, but lighting candles in one's bedroom is certainly a traditional thing to do on Yom Kippur. The Mishna (Pesachim 4:4) rules that some places light Yom Kippur candles and some places don't. The explanation always given (see, for example, the commentary of Rav Ovadia of Bartenura) is that marital relations are ...


5

The Aruch haShulchan writes (OC 695:8): ומצוה להרבות בנרות לפנות ערב, כדכתיב: "ליהודים היתה אורה"‏ It is a Mitzva to add candles in the evening, as it says: The Jews had light He doesn't source himself and I haven't seen this anywhere else. It would seem he is using the word 'Mitzva' here quite loosely.


5

The Sefer Piskei Tshuvos siman 263:10 writes that if a man lights he makes the bracha first because he is not mekabel shabbas with his lighting(unless he wants to take shabbas in with lighting,then he should light first). See footnote 32 which brings sources such as Eishel Avraham and the Aruch Hashulchan seif 13,there is an opnion brought in the footnote ...


4

Dr. Yehudah (Leo) Levi, in his Jewish Chrononomy (Hebrew section, p. מ, third footnote) cites two reasons that have been suggested for the 18-minute standard: It is in deference to the opinion of Sefer Yereim that twilight (bein hashemashos) begins a 3/4-mil walk before sunset (not after it, as in other opinions). Opinions on the length of time it takes to ...


4

Rama Orach Chaim 672:2 says that even when you light it indoors in a place where those outside can not see the Menorah it should also be done on time. Per Kav HaYashar 96 you should light as soon as possible, since Mitzva Habaa L'Yodcha Al Tachmitzena.


4

Regarding your sidebar about conversion: Decisions about conversion need to be made with the guidance of a competent rabbi who knows you. If you are serious about converting, and you don't already know a rabbi, I implore you to get in touch with a rabbi in your area, or as close to your area as possible. Relationships build over time, but first contact must ...


3

Indeed the custom here in Jerusalem is to light candels 40 minutes before Shekiah. The current Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, Rabbi Moishe Shternbuch discusses the source of this custom in his book Moadim U'Zmanim (vol 8, siman 156). I will try to elaborate more on this after Shabbos if I remember!


3

R' Eylashiv that in such a situation one shouldn't light, and if one did, he wouldn't be yotzei. Therefore, he advises people not to stay in such a place over Chanuka. If one cannot light, then if one could see someone elses' lit candle, say "She'asah Nissim" and "Shehechiyanu". If one is far from any Jews and can't see any candle, one shouldn't make any ...


3

Technically, yes. Candles should be lit on the Yom Tov or Shabbos table, or at the very least in the same room (unless there is a danger, such as young children who can get hurt). Succos would be no exception (barring any danger of course). Also, the Succah is meant to be like your home so everything important should ideally be done there (including, for ...


3

Lechatchila, one should light Shabbat and Yom Tov candles where one is going to eat (Shulchan Aruch 273:7 and Mishna Berura there), which in this case is the Sukkah. However, the Talmud (Sukkah 29a) explicitly forbids keeping lit candles in a small Sukkah and this is codified in Shulchan Aruch (OC 639:1). The Mishna Berura there (sk 8) is clear that this ...


3

The reason why candles that were lit for the previous night of Chanuka must be extinguished and re-lit is, (as Shulchan Aruch OC 675 explains) because "hadloka oseh mitzvah". That is, the mitzvah of Chanuka candles is not the fact that they are lit, but rather the actual act of lighting. The Gemora (Shabbos 23a) derives this from the fact that the brocha we ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch (673:2) rules (based on the discussion in the Talmud Shabbat 21a-b) that if a Chanukkah candle goes out after lighting it, even on Friday before Shabbat starts, one need not relight it because the mitzva was already accomplished after lighting. The Taz there (sk 10) recommends relighting it anyway (without a bracha) to 'complete the ...


3

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


2

Did you ask the hotel management if there's some other place where you could light? My understanding is that second choice after wherever you're sleeping is wherever you're eating. Perhaps you could find a place (maybe even outside) where you could light your menora and monitor it while you eat your dinner. Another possibility: Get yourself invited to ...



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