New answers tagged

0

I speak about the drift at What will happen to the calendar if the Sanhedrin is re-instituted Calendrical Calculations 3rd Edition by Nachum Dershowitz (Author), Edward M. Reingold (Author) gives the algorithms for a number of calendars using Lisp. The fixed calendar of Hillel II is one of the algorithms presented. The Jewish Encyclopedia states that ...


0

I will give you the figures for calculation. The "molad" period is 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and 1/18th of a minute 3.3333 seconds). The calendar we use contains 235 months over a period of 19 years. So multiple that timespan above by 235 and divide by 19. That will give you the time period we have as an average "year". The Gregorian calendar uses ...


1

Check out hebcal.com -- it has exactly what you need for the second option. There's also code you can use to script something that will tell you whenever Pesach lands before the Equinox. I'm personally partial to hebcal-js, having written it myself. ;)


10

The current fixed calendar is arranged (by adding or taking out an extra day in Marcheshvan or Kislev) such that Yom Kippur can't fall on Friday or Sunday (so there won't be two days in a row where no work at all can be done) and such that Hoshana Rabba can't fall on Shabbat. Most months are of fixed length, so this effectively limits all holidays in some ...


-1

Using the anno mundi system started by Maimonides , devide the Hebrew year by 19 . This year is 5776. It is divisible evenly by 19 , and yielding 304. In other words, there have been 304 cycles since it started. Next, the next leap years are in a sequence of 3-3-2, and 3-3-3-2, giving 7 leap years out of every 19 year cycle . The next leap year will be 5779 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included