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1

In the fixed calendar it happens 7 times in 19 years. The lunar month, according to our tradition (we announce the "molad") in fact is exactly 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and one "chalak", an 18th of a minute, or 42524 minutes + 1 chalak, or 765433 chalakim. (Hey, almost an easy number to remember, isn't that). If we ignore "leap seconds" and we know ...


0

In short: Mikeitz is often Shabbos Chanukah, but not always. Every now and then the calendar gives us a year where we actually read the split-the-baby story.


3

I did a luach chart for this. When Rosh Hashanah falls on Shabbat, Simchat Torah is a Sunday (or Shabbat in Israel) so B'reishit is a whole week later, the latest date it call fall. When Rosh Hashanah (and thus Shmini Atzeret) is on a Thursday you start reading B'reishit at an earlier date. When Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat (or Monday) you never get 29 ...


4

Supplemental to the answer, above, that lists the specific years, here's the general scenario: The months of Cheshvan and Kislev can have either 29 or 30 days, each, and there are 3 configurations. To understand when and why they occur, see this Wikipedia article. Briefly, if the 1st day of Rosh Hashannah occurs on Shabbat, and the year is "deficient", ...


2

I am the research assistant (intern) on a study (currently unpublished) examining patterns of aliyah. (We sent the draft to the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption for feedback, and more data, but that's probably on hold for the next few months until after elections.) The hard data shows that avi's answer isn't totally correct. By far, the most common time ...


15

Actually, Miketz does not always fall out on Chanukah. It appears that whoever told me that was mistaken. :) I ran some code (using my JavaScript Hebcal API) and discovered that in the 100 years from 5700-5800, Miketz is not on Chanukah 10 times. In 5703, 5706, 5710, 5730, 5733, 5737, 5757, 5761, 5781, and 5784, Miketz fell out on the 4th of Tevet, just ...


3

I am assuming that your question refers to the current "fixed" calendar, so it seems that you have numerous answers on that. I wanted to add that historically, this was not always the situation during the time that the Sanhedrin existed and prior to that. I just completed a class on the history and the workings of the Judaic calendar, which you will find ...


2

Jewish leap years don't happen every seven or every four -- they happen as part of a nineteen year cycle. For example, see the answers to this question, about how to tell which year is a Jewish leap year -- I really liked this answer to that question :)


7

The extra Adar happens when there is a leap year -- we add a month to preserve the lunar properties of the calendar. Seven in nineteen years are leap years, so every 2-3 years on average. From Judaism 101: Adar I is added in the 3rd, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th and 19th years of the cycle. (Technically it is Adar I (aka Adar Alef) that's the ...


1

Rav Aviner addresses this question as follows Q: Is there a source for celebrating one's birthday? A: There is no early source besides the Torah's mention of Pharoah's birthday. There is no mention in the Mishnah, Gemara, Rambam or Shulchan Aruch. The Aderet harshly opposed birthday celebrations. The book "Nefesh David". And some authorities ...


3

Check out my hebcal-js library, the perfect thing you need for this. Include it, and then you can use one of the following snippets: This is only if you will never have dates in Elul (due to a bug): var hebDate = new Hebcal.HDate(new Date(2014, 11 /* meaning 12 */, 8)); hebDate.setMonth(hebDate.getMonth() + 1); var gregDate = hebDate.greg(); // a ...


1

Looking at your example, you can simply take advantage of the date conversion functions built into whichever library you are using. So if you want to add a Hebrew month to a Julian date, you can: Convert the Julian date into a Hebrew date (i.e. Hebrew Year / Month / Day) Take the Hebrew month value and add 1. Just keep in mind that if you are in Elul and ...


6

Try https://www.mymikvahcalendar.org which has approbations from 7 Rabbis, 1 institution and 3 Kallah teachers. The FAQ also talks about the settings menu so it may have options to customize whether or not to take into account different opinions and stringencies. Seems to be free and is web-based, so it'll work on any computer. Caveat: That's all I know ...



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