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14

The epoch for the Jewish calendar is the creation of the world, not the Revelation at Sinai which traditionally occured about 2500 years later and marks the beginning of distinctly Jewish national religious obligations.


12

Rashi in the linked Gemara says that the reason we are "marbim b'simcha" is because they are "ymei nisim k'mo Purim v'Pesach" based on which some conclude that Adar Rishon is not included, as no miracles happened in that time period. The Levush (685:1) says that we do not increase simcha in Adar 1. The Sfas Emes says we do. Some want to conclude based on ...


8

This is discussed in the Talmud (Shabbat 114) and the Rambam rules (Shabbat 5:21) that no Havdallah is recited after Shabbat when Yom Kippur falls on Sunday.


7

Yes, someone born on a certain Hebrew-calendar date will have the same calendar date as his birthday every year. Thus, some one born on a red-letter day that is the same date every year, like the first day of Sukos, will have that as his birthday. (In fact, I have seen yahrzeit plaques that indicate "1st of Sukos" or the like instead of a date.) Some ...


7

The gemara in Megillah 6b-7a explains why when it investigates the Mishnaic statement that in a leap year, one is required to read the megillah in the second Adar to be yotzei the requirement. (as per dafyomi.co.il) R. Eliezer says, every year we celebrate in the month next to Shevat. R. Shimon says, every year we celebrate in the month adjacent to Nisan. ...


6

There are two main Regalim - Pesach and Sukkot. Each one has another one-day mini yom-tov without special mitzvos afterwards. They are each called an "Atzeret" since they have no special mitzvot and are a culmination of the previous holiday. 7 weeks after the beginning of Pesach is Shavuot/Atzeret, and the day after Sukkot is Shemini Atzeret. The ...


5

R' Gil Student cites the Ibn Ezra “[T]he beginning of each individual’s year is from the moment he was born, and when the sun returns to the same point at which it was earlier, the person completes one full year” (['Iggeret HaShabbat, chapter 1]p. 21). Nevertheless, insofar as there are halachic implications, R' Student understood the Bar Mitzvah to ...


5

R' Ephraim Greenblatt holds that it applies to some extent to Adar Rishon was well. R' Yiztchak Zilberstein cites sources for both opinions but concludes somewhat tentatively that Adar I is also included. The last Lubavitcher Rebbe also holds that Adar I is included. See here and here. See also here.


5

Tikkunei Zohar (introduction, 4b, passim) associates these with the verse (Ex. 3:15, זה שמי לעלם וזה זכרי לדר דר - "This is My name forever, and this is My remembrance for all generations." The reference there is to the Four-Lettered Name of Hashem, י-ה-ו-ה. Each of the terms in that verse ("My Name" and "My remembrance"), then, relates to one half of that ...


4

Sometimes the name changes because it spells a "bad" idea, but sometimes it's done because the other one is just nicer. 1910 - תר"ע became עת"ר (from Ra - bad) 1912 - תרע"ב became תער"ב (like here) (from Rav - hunger) 1917 - תרע"ז became עזר"ת (like here) (Ezras - help) 1919 - תרע"ט became עטר"ת (like here) (Ateres - crown) 1938 - תרצ"ח became תרח"צ ...


4

To solar cycle represents continuity and consistency. The lunar cycle represents rise and fall, והחיות רצוא ושוב. The two cycles don't inherently mesh, and it takes the actions of people (as represented by Beis Din which sets the leap year) to combine the two. See here for a similar expression of this idea. In terms of lessons in Avodas Hashem, there are ...


3

The sefer אליהו רבה Siman 423 writes that it should be said for all the months of the leap year, but the custom is to say it only until Rosh Chodesh Nisan. The Pri Megadim explains that the Eliyahu Rabbah means that if not for our custom to stop after Adar we should really continue saying it until Tishrei. (The מהרי"ב explains that our custom of stopping ...


3

I have a book here that lists the Hebrew-calendar dates for starting "v'sen tal umatar" for the years 5750 through 5851. Counting, I see that in 26 of those 102 years (25%) Chanuka starts before that date. (And in two of the years they start the same night: 5787 and 5833.)


3

The pamphlet "הדף היומי בהלכה", published by Dirshu, issue 4, Ⅰ Adar 5774, cites K'dushas Levi (Ki Sisa) and S'fas Emes (likutim for Adar) as saying that the month of Adar (whose zodiac sign is fish) corresponds to Yosef (which, like fish, is unaffected by ayin hara) — see the Tur (OC 417), who says each month corresponds to a tribe. Thus, it had ...


3

See here: http://ohr.edu/special/misc/timeline.htm 3000 years is a nice round number and refers back to the revelation at Mount Sinai which occurred 2448 years after creation. 5774-2448=3326 years ago. 3000 is just a round number that approximates 3326. You do have a very valid point, however. There's a tradition in the Talmud that states that the year ...


3

I have been told by a Rabbi whom I greatly respect that he has permitted geirim, along with the Jewish son of a non-Jewish father and a Jewish mother, to say Kaddish for their non-Jewish parent(s). I believe that much of his reasoning was based on Kibbud Av v'Em (which continues to apply to one's non-Jewish parents even after conversion where one is ...


3

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus 56-58 discusses the different Minhagim. This is my understanding of what he says. An Aveil should not Daven for the Amud on Shabbos, Yom Tov, and the high holy days. Exceptions are as follows. If there is no one who can Daven as good as the Aveil the Aveil may Daven during these days. In addition if the Aveil is the regular Chazan on ...


3

The reason actually has nothing to do with VaYelech, but with Ki-Savo. The Gemara in Megillah 31b says that the curses in Devarim (Ki-Savo) have to be read before Rosh Hashana - so as to end the year and its curses. We then add one Parsha as a break, so that we don't enter the new year from the curses. We then have a practical issue how to ...


3

Seder Olam Rabbah 8 says the Jews left Sinai on 20 Iyar of Year 2 after the Exodus, traveled to Kibrot Hattaavah, spent 30 days there (because that's how long they ate the quail for Num 11:20), traveled to Chatzerot, spent 7 days there (because that's how long Miriam was expelled for Num 12:15), traveled to Midbar Paran, arriving on 28 Sivan or the same ...


3

Bnei Yissaschar says that the famous Gemara that says that 40 days prior to the creation of a child a Bas Kol goes out and says Bas Ploni L'ploni. Yom Rishon that the world was created was on 25 Elul. 40 days prior is 15 Av. Since the world was created Bshvil Yisroel and we are the bride of Hashem, therefore 40 days prior to the creation, which is 15 Av a ...


3

According to the Michtav M'Eliyahu (Vol. 2 pg 125) on the essay titled "משנכנס אדר" he discusses how the command to be joyous when Adar enters is related to the joy of Purim. He explains that the happiness we feel on Purim is a הכרת הטוב - recognizing the goodness - of the miracle of Purim, which is all about revenge. HaShem took revenge on Haman and ונהפוך ...


3

I was told that the reason is that since there is no 'thousands' letter equivalent, we tend to show it as a separate indicator. It is similar to people who write the secular year as a two digit rather than a four digit number. Thus, the thousand indicator is shown as the letter with an apostrophe.


2

(Background: Biblically, the new grain becomes permitted at dawn on the 16th of Nissan if there is no Korban Omer being brought, but Rabbi Yochanon ben Zakai enacted to wait the whole day now that there is no Temple.) The Talmud (Menachot 68b) records: רב פפא ורב הונא בריה דרב יהושע אכלי חדש באורתא דשיתסר נגהי שבסר קסברי חדש בחוצה לארץ דרבנן ולספיקא לא ...


2

In his Luach Hayom Yom, the Lubavitcher Rebbe explains the message of Pesach Sheini: "The theme of Pesach Sheini is that it is never too late. It is always possible to put things right. Even if one was tamei (ritually impure), or one was far away, and even in a case of "lachem", when this (impurity etc.) was deliberate - nonetheless he can correct it." This ...


2

January 27th is probably the most universally accepted non-Jewish holocaust remembrance day. It is the anniversary of the day that Soviet Troop liberated Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1945. It was designated by the UN in 2005 and as of 2004 at least 12 countries have some type of official observance on this day. Israel has designated this day, not as a holocaust ...


2

Here is a nice one: תְּהִלִּים קלח:ב - אֶשְׁתַּחֲוֶה. אֶל הֵיכַל קָדְשְׁךָ וְאוֹדֶה אֶת שְׁמֶךָ עַל חַסְדְּךָ וְעַל אֲמִתֶּךָ כִּי הִגְדַּלְתָּ עַל כָּל שִׁמְךָ אִמְרָתֶךָ בְּיוֹם. קָרָאתִי וַתַּעֲנֵנִי תַּרְהִבֵנִי בְנַפְשִׁי עֹז יוֹדוּךָ. יְהוָה כָּל מַלְכֵי אָרֶץ כִּי שָׁמְעוּ אִמְרֵי פִיךָ I built a site which calculated every possible gematria for ...


2

After dividing the year by 19, if the remainder's digits have only curves or only straight lines, it's a leap year. Otherwise, it's not. 00 - all curved 03 - all curved 06 - all curved 08 - all curved 11 - all straight 14 - all straight 17 - all straight Of course, this depends on the font you use. We're assuming that 0,3,6,8 are curved; 1,4,7 are ...


2

In the Bavli to that Mishna (Gittin 80a), 'Ula explains that the reason there was an enactment made to write the date according to the local government was "משום שלום מלכות" "to maintain peace with the government". Rashi explains that the governments would see we use their dating system and assume that we value their leadership. Accordingly, Rambam rules ...


1

Here Rabbi Shimon Silver answers: Since there is no musaf with its mention, the announcement and maximum public notice is not possible anyhow. Therefore, it reverts to its rightful place. Once we are doing it by Ma'ariv, Ma'ariv is not an appropriate time for announcements at all, for the same reason that Mashiv HaRuach is not announced at Ma'ariv.



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