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15

Actually, Miketz does not always fall out on Chanukah. It appears that whoever told me that was mistaken. :) I ran some code (using my JavaScript Hebcal API) and discovered that in the 100 years from 5700-5800, Miketz is not on Chanukah 10 times. In 5703, 5706, 5710, 5730, 5733, 5737, 5757, 5761, 5781, and 5784, Miketz fell out on the 4th of Tevet, just ...


12

HebCal is a full Hebrew calendar that provides lists of all the Jewish holidays, for any year. In the interest of full disclosure, i have done volunteer programming for them, but am not officially affiliated. Here is a list of all the Jewish holidays for the year 5775 (this year). Note that not every item on that list is a full holiday where work is ...


10

You are correct that the .NET implementation is apparently not consistent with Halacha (i.e. Jewish law) (Orach Chaim 55:10 and Mishne Berurah ibid) and your first 2 rules are correct and consistent with Halacha. Jewish law (ibid, MB 45) calculations are correctly implemented in HebCal contrary to your third rule. Specifically, if a boy is born on 30 ...


10

In Israel, only the first night is a full holiday, and as such, the Seder is only ever on the first night. In the Diaspora, both the first and second nights are full holidays. The Seder should be done on both nights. If, for some reason, someone is really only able to do one of them, it should be the first. This is because the first night is a Biblical ...


9

The best time? Get on the next flight. (listen to a clip of Gershon Veroba's song) But as for the most common/popular times to come: I am the research assistant (intern) on a study (currently unpublished) examining patterns of aliyah. (We sent the draft to the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption for feedback, and more data, but that's probably on hold for the ...


9

It has been used 11 times so far since the enactment of the fixed calendar in 4119. It was used in 4179, 4257, 4504, 4602, 4849, 5096, 5194, 5441, 5519, 5688, and 5766. The next time it will be used is 6013 if we still have a fixed calendar then. You can read about this exceedingly rare Dechiya and its history here.


8

To answer your question as briefly as I can, during a leap year where Rosh Hashannah begins on Tursday and the year is "Chaser" - "Deficient" meaning 383 days long, then Pesach begins on Sunday, and there will be 55 Shabatot in total. I am also assuming that we are talking about Galut readings, as Israel readings have slightly different rules. We have 54 ...


7

This is the only occurrence of that phenomenon in the 247-year cycle. Source: the table in the Tur, hilchos rosh chodesh.


7

The extra Adar happens when there is a leap year -- we add a month to preserve the lunar properties of the calendar. Seven in nineteen years are leap years, so every 2-3 years on average. From Judaism 101: Adar I is added in the 3rd, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th and 19th years of the cycle. (Technically it is Adar I (aka Adar Alef) that's the ...


6

Dinonline has an extensive essay on this issue. In short, the Tzitz Eliezer and Yabia Omer allow the writing of the secular date, but mention that the Jewish date is preferred when possible. They do have different ideas on how to write it out (see article for details). The Maharam Schik, on the other hand, was against such a practice (I remember learning ...


6

Technically you could date a check in Israel with the year 5774, and it would be valid; however, few people do so. The "Hebrew date", including the year, is used on Jewish marriage and divorce documents -- though they specify "according to the year 5774 to the world's creation, according to the counting used in this location of X", to make clear that we're ...


5

The red-letter days listed in your question are, indeed, the only times we say it, and for the reason you quote: because those are the days the musaf sacrificial offerings were offered to God in the Temple back in the good old days. See Numbers chapters 28–29.


5

The Babylonian calendar wasn't adopted exactly as it was, but the names of the months were. This was recognized by the Sages in the Gemara, Yerushalmi Rosh Hashana 1:2. Why the Jews adopted these Babylonian names is a good question. In fact, it seems like the Jews did have their own ancient names for the months, such as 'Ziv' and 'Bul', which are ...


5

Try https://www.mymikvahcalendar.org which has approbations from 7 Rabbis, 1 institution and 3 Kallah teachers. The FAQ also talks about the settings menu so it may have options to customize whether or not to take into account different opinions and stringencies. Seems to be free and is web-based, so it'll work on any computer. Caveat: That's all I know ...


4

The Gemara derives via drasha an obligation to read zachor. Accordingly they must have said it even before Purim. They specifically started saying it before Purim sometime before the time of the Mishnah, for the mishna in Megillah (29a) says that we say it specifically before purim. The reason for this is to combine the themes of destruction of Amalek ...


4

From the Luach Dvar B'Itoh תשע"א Page 454: The 3rd day of the Month of Teveis is sometimes the day after Chanuka. (Other years it's the 8th day of Chanuka) The day after Chanuka is the first day in the year one can no longer bring Bikurim.(ביכורים א, ו). The 3rd day of the Month of Teveis in the year 0002 is the day Hevel was killed by Kayin, according ...


4

"Up to about 1515 only Hebrew letters were used, but Daniel Bomberg introduced Arabic figures as well. In rare cases the alphabet took the place of numbers (Kol Bo, Rimini, 1525, Rome, 1545). Pagination was introduced later than the signature. No incunabulum appears to have had it. The first to have had numbered folios, though not very consistently so, is ...


4

Mishna Berura 417:1 ר"ח וכו' - מנהג קדמונינו לברך את החודש בשבת שלפני ר"ח חוץ מלפני ר"ח תשרי ורמז לזה בכסה ליום חגנו The custom is to bless the new month on the preceding Shabbos, with the exception of Rosh Chodesh Tishrei. A hint to this is the verse "in hiding the day of our Holiday" I once heard an explanation that this is in line with the ...


4

Supplemental to the answer, above, that lists the specific years, here's the general scenario: The months of Cheshvan and Kislev can have either 29 or 30 days, each, and there are 3 configurations. To understand when and why they occur, see this Wikipedia article. Briefly, if the 1st day of Rosh Hashannah occurs on Shabbat, and the year is "deficient", ...


3

There’s a Rabbi Frand tape on it. It appears that in the Chasam Sofer’s world, the standard Jewish custom had been to write only the Hebrew date on a tombstone, and then some progressives wanted to include the Gregorian date — he railed against that change. But that was that particular application. Apparently there are documents and letters from the Chasam ...


3

Since the Jewish year begins on 1 Tishrei and ends on 29 Elul, your question is essentially to translate 1 Tishrei and 29 Elul of every Shmita year into Gregorian. The Shmita years are those divisible by 7. Since 1900 these years have been: 5663, 5670, 5677, 5684, 5691, 5698, 5705, 5712, 5719, 5726, 5733, 5740, 5747, 5754, 5761, 5768, and 5775 (which began ...


3

Check out my hebcal-js library, the perfect thing you need for this. Include it, and then you can use one of the following snippets: This is only if you will never have dates in Elul (due to a bug): var hebDate = new Hebcal.HDate(new Date(2014, 11 /* meaning 12 */, 8)); hebDate.setMonth(hebDate.getMonth() + 1); var gregDate = hebDate.greg(); // a ...


3

I am assuming that your question refers to the current "fixed" calendar, so it seems that you have numerous answers on that. I wanted to add that historically, this was not always the situation during the time that the Sanhedrin existed and prior to that. I just completed a class on the history and the workings of the Judaic calendar, which you will find ...


3

I did a luach chart for this. When Rosh Hashanah falls on Shabbat, Simchat Torah is a Sunday (or Shabbat in Israel) so B'reishit is a whole week later, the latest date it call fall. When Rosh Hashanah (and thus Shmini Atzeret) is on a Thursday you start reading B'reishit at an earlier date. When Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat (or Monday) you never get 29 ...


3

Megila 30a - 9 lines from the bottom has a dispute as to what is the third Shabbos. The Tanna Kama says the Shabbos immediately after Purim, and Rabbi Chama B'Rab Chanina says it is the Shabbos that is closer to Nissan. The Gemara says there is no dispute, it depends when Rosh Chodesh Nisaan occurs. If it occurs on Shabbos then Parshas Para will be read on ...


3

It is customary to pledge charity when saying yizkor (which is said on the last day of Pesach and Shavuos and on Yom Kipur and Sh'mini Atzeres) or "Kel male" (said anytime for specific persons, especially on or before a yahrzeit). (P're M'gadim, MZ, OC 284:2.) There are requirements to give to the poor on Purim (OC 694) and before Pesach (Rama, OC 429:1). ...


2

According to the Ben Ish Chai it is important. But even more important is one's bris day. He writes in shana alef parshas Re'eh ois 17 that people are noheig to make their birthday into a yom tov, and it is a good siman, he adds that he too did it. He goes on to describe the bris-day minhag.


2

From the Luach Dvar B'Itoh תשע"א Page 452: 2nd day of the Month of Teveis is sometimes זאת חנוכה. (other years it's the 7th day of Chanuka) The last day of Chanuka is the last day in the year one can bring Bikurim - albeit without a Bracha since it's after Sukkoth. (ביכורים א, ו). Yahrzeit of יעקב צבי בן יהושע אשר רבינוביץ מפוריסוב, the author of the ...



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