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Supplemental to the answer, above, that lists the specific years, here's the general scenario: The months of Cheshvan and Kislev can have either 29 or 30 days, each, and there are 3 configurations. To understand when and why they occur, see this Wikipedia article. Briefly, if the 1st day of Rosh Hashannah occurs on Shabbat, and the year is "deficient", ...


3

I did a luach chart for this. When Rosh Hashanah falls on Shabbat, Simchat Torah is a Sunday (or Shabbat in Israel) so B'reishit is a whole week later, the latest date it call fall. When Rosh Hashanah (and thus Shmini Atzeret) is on a Thursday you start reading B'reishit at an earlier date. When Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat (or Monday) you never get 29 ...


2

I am the research assistant (intern) on a study (currently unpublished) examining patterns of aliyah. (We sent the draft to the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption for feedback, and more data, but that's probably on hold for the next few months until after elections.) The hard data shows that avi's answer isn't totally correct. By far, the most common time ...


1

In the fixed calendar it happens 7 times in 19 years. The lunar month, according to our tradition (we announce the "molad") in fact is exactly 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and one "chalak", an 18th of a minute, or 42524 minutes + 1 chalak, or 765433 chalakim. (Hey, almost an easy number to remember, isn't that). If we ignore "leap seconds" and we know ...



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