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8

Our sources discussed this concept long ago. See Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 151:1, e.g. the Talmud discussed whether I may sell frankincense to pagans knowing that they will use it for idolatrous worship. There is a key distinction between enabling a sin (i.e. it would be impossible or incredibly difficult for the sinner to sin without you, or you are ...


7

As a limud zchus (a line of reasoning to judge others favorably for their actions) Rav Vosner, as I understand it, says it is possible that this doesn't fall under the category of assisting a transgression since it is possible that the clothes will be worn in such a way that they are not actually immodest (i.e. layered) or because one is not participating at ...


7

I would assume it depends on what's considered a normal form of transaction. If any action is recognized by society as a form of transaction, halacha recognizes it -- this is known as kinyan situmta. But Rambam and Shulchan Aruch rule that if you use "word alone" to commit to buying or selling (without any language of oaths), "though you have made no mark ...


6

In modern times in the first world, if a gentile wants observant Jews to frequent his establishment, he should obtain commercial certification of kashrus (kosher status). The certifying agency will explain all he needs to do to satisfy their requirements, which will vary from agency to agency. And the only restriction on Jews will be to ensure that there is ...


5

Rabbi Avraham Danczig -- best-known for his work Chayei Adam (c. 1800), describes his own life's struggle as a businessman trying to find time for Torah in the introduction to his work Chochmas Adam. He discusses it there. It's not that merchants are arrogant, the point was a warning "if you let yourself get too caught up in your work, you'll never have ...


5

For the general rule, Shulchan Aruch Yore Dei’ah Simon 117 reads like this (parentheses are RaMah): “Anything that is forbidden by Torah law, even if it is something that one may derive pleasure thereof, if it is something specifically for food – it is forbidden to do business with it (or to borrow against it. Even to buy it to feed it to his non-Jewish ...


5

Quoting from "Rubashkin Revenge: Ethical Certificates at Center of Dispute" (Jewish Journal, Los Angeles, July 25, 2012: Although the pushback against the Tav appears to be coming primarily, if not exclusively, from individuals affiliated with the Chabad Lubavitch movement, there is no evidence that any official encouragement came from Chabad, according ...


5

In theory I see no reason per se that would prohibit a non-Jew from buying and selling books, menorahs, and the like, if s/he really wanted to do so. An item on which the seller's word is required that it is ritually okay would be more problematic, but these days your matza, myrtle-branches, and the like come shrink-wrapped and pre-certified, so it's really ...


5

The Shach there quotes Rif, who says that once the money is spent, the deposit converts to a loan, and that is why "Shimon" is responsible for all losses. This is only logical: The difference between a deposit (pikadon) and a loan (halva'ah) is that with the former, one returns the item itself, whereas with the latter, one is responsible to repay the value ...


4

R. Asher Meir at the Business Ethics Center in Jerusalem, writing for Aish HaTorah, answers a similar question thus (excerpted): The Mishna discusses a person who climbs a wild olive tree and starts shaking the ripe olives from the branches onto the ground below. Since the olive tree doesn't belong to anybody, the olives on the ground don't belong to ...


4

Let's assume here that we're starting with all-kosher ingredients, e.g. plain produce without infestation concerns; ingredients with a kosher symbol on them; kosher meat that came certified, soaked, salted, and ready to use. If a non-Jew wants to open, say, a grocery store where all products go straight from case to shelf, and only stock products with ...


4

I am not sure why people are opposed, as different people give different reasons, and there is no "official" opposition front. Moreover, while no one (to the best of my knowledge) forbids one to place a sticker saying "R' Yanklowitz likes this company", there are several sticky points in this particular case, most stemming from a lack of honesty as to their ...


4

When a loan is given and a time is set for the return of the loan, the lender may not demand the return of the loan before the set time has arrived (Choshen Mishpat 73, 2). However, if the borrower wishes to repay the loan before the time has arrived he may do so (Choshen Mishpat 74, 2). This is the general rule (albeit there are certain special ...


3

In the article by Rabbi Dr. Michael Broyde and Prof. Steven Resnicoff cited by Isaac Moses in his comment to the question, there is a brief summary at page 2, followed by discussion and sources. See the original text for footnotes. They write: The sparse literature on the relationship between corporate ownership and Jewish law obligations reflects the ...


3

To clarify -- the Noda bihuda makes it clear that there is never a prohibition of "tzaar baalei chayim" per se when your intent is to swiftly kill an animal -- by any means. He says that to go hunting for fun is technically permissible, but a horrible thing to do. That discussion was only about hunting for fun. If a wild animal is threatening me or my ...


3

You ask two questions: Is there a halachic reason to be opposed to Uri L'Tzedek and Tav haYosher? Why do some frum Jews oppose it? I cannot answer the first. As to the second, the culture of the orthodox Jewish community is that it is resistant to change and that new trends tend to meet opposition at first. Here, for example, rabbis for centuries, and ...


3

The Gemara (Shabbos 150a) points out that we are restricted on Shabbos ממצוא חפצך, from looking after our personal business affairs - but that this implies that חפצי שמים מותרין, Divine business affairs are okay. Based on this, it lists several categories of things that are permitted on Shabbos under this heading, one of which is פוסקין צדקה לעניים - making ...


3

Yirmeyahu, great source. He points out in that responsa that wearing non-tzeniusdik clothing is prohibited min-HaTorah, for it causes men to sin. It seems to me that one could argue that this consitutes "Mesaya D'Mesaya" i.e. assisting another to assist a third person to sin, which may not be a problem. See Avodah Zara (14a) and (21a) where it is stated ...


3

Normally, in cases of significant underprice, the seller can demand a retraction of the sale (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 237:2, q.v.), though he cannot demand that the sale remain intact but the buyer pay the difference in price (S'ma :6). Although that doesn't normally apply to documents (SA :29), it does when the underprice is by more than half (Rama ...


2

Depends, if you have a grocery that resells closed products, like drinks, cookies etc I don't recall anything right now that would limit you. If you are producing/serving the food, like in a restaurant you will be limited to the rules of cashrut. There are many details, but the question is on top of that what difference does it make if the owner is not ...


2

There was an initiative very similar to this from non-halachic groups, and in general an objection raised about a non-Torah true organization imposing requirements in the guise of a hechsher. Perhaps there is perception that the objection raised in that case apply here. I am not informed if the same issues apply here or not. They inlcude: Being founded ...


2

The source of "Hakol Keminhag Hamedina" is from the law of "Kol Tnai Shebemamon Kayam". For example, if all merchants in a city agree to a Situmta (a mutually agreed apon method of acquiring an item, like a handshake) and a merchant (who did this situmta) wants to back out of a deal, the court wont let him as they assume that he follows the custom of the ...


2

Ribbis involves paying the lender money above and beyond the principal. In the case of a deposit, there would be no circumstance in which the guardian would be obligated to pay back more than the amount of money that was placed in his safekeeping and the issue of ribbis simply would not arise. The guardian's greater degree of obligation after using the ...


2

I would think a critical point here (though not necessarily the only point) would be the concept of lashon hara leto'elet -- something that's necessary to be said for a productive purpose. Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz has a lecture on the subject where he asks if one can be an investigative journalist and stay within the laws of lashon hara. Well, what is the ...


2

Business​Halacha.com has articles and a question-and-answer hotline and was recommended to me (by someone I trust in matters of halacha) for all questions of Choshen Mishpat (torts, bailments, loans, rentals, sales, etc.) and ribis (interest).


2

It seems that the Torah puts two separate obligations on you – hakarat ha'tov and tochacha (rebuke). You owe your Client some thanks because he could have tried to avoid paying altogether or caused you more costs in recovering the debt. For this attitude, see here -a small quote: “Moshe gets to the well. The daughters of Midyan are in trouble and ...


1

The Gmara on Baba Batra 23:A says: "רב יוסף הוה ליה הנהו תאלי, דהוו אתו אומני ויתבי תותייהו, ואתו עורבי אכלי דמא, וסלקי אבי תאלי, ומפסדי תמרי. אמר להו רב יוסף: אפיקו לי קורקור מהכא". R' yossf had palm trees and doctors set benethe the trees and doind their practice. crows came and ate the blood that was left and staind the datse. R' yossf said - Banish the ...


1

I think that the general point is that in Halacha, corporations don't exist. Think about it this way: I sell an old laptop on ebay. Am I now corporate? I sell 5 old laptops on ebay. What about now? I sell 5000 new laptops on ebay. yada yada yada I am HP. Am I a corporation now? Even multiple owners doesn't change anyting. If two brothers bought a ...


1

This case is similar to the idea of sending mail on erev shabbos when we know that it will be picked up by the mail carrier on Shabbos. This question is addressed by the Shulchan Arukh. From the article Sending Mail before Shabbos by Aryeh Lebowitz: A. Regular mail. The Shulchan Aruch 247:1 explicitly rules that when there are predetermined postal ...



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