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14

Ari Zivotofsky and I have worked hard to collect tens of testimonies from Yemenites and North Africans on the ID and traditions of which chagav (locust-like insect) is kosher. There is no question, as there are still many people alive who can remember them from their countries of origin. Birds as the paradigm As mentioned in Isaac Moses' response above, ...


10

The Mishneh Torah rules: The prohibition applies to a limb or flesh that is separated from either a domesticated animal or a beast. However, it appears to me that a gentile is not executed for eating a limb taken from a living bird. ( Melachim uMilchamot 9:11) Though the Rava'ad (see Moznaim ibid) disagrees, he exempts a sheretz (creeping creature), ...


8

The Iggerot Moshe (Helek Bet Hoshen Mishpat 47) writes that if you have a bug, and it bothers you, you may kill, but preferably not by hand. He says there is no ISUR. Since there is no problem in killing a bug, I would assume since Saar Bale Hayim Deorayta, I would assume that you should kill him. EDIT: I asked a big Talmid Hacham, and he said according to ...


6

If we count from the mabul we get a different answer. According to this site, the mabul began in 1658, and it lasted a year, so it ended in 1659, 4114 years ago. 4114 is 17 times 242. Cicadas come from the ground when, after their rest period (which varies by species) the ground warms up. I would think that the mabul would have reset that clock and the ...


5

The source for the Chilazon being in the Kineret is the Zohar, II, 48b, on parashat Terumah: "And blue" (Shemot 25:3): Rabbi Yitzchak said: Blue [techelet] is from that fish that is in the Sea Genosar, WHICH IS THE SEA OF GALILEE, which is in the portion of Zvulon. This color is needed for the work of the tabernacle to show this color, AS IT IS ...


5

According to Wikipedia, Murex trunculus is found naturally around the entire Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea and on nearby coasts of the Atlantic, always in shallow water: seemingly, nowhere else.


5

The author of Or HaChayim writes (Pri To'ar 85) that he discouraged the members of his city from eating them for a few reasons, one of them being because their tradition was not completely reliable. I later happened to come across this article which discusses this topic more extensively.


5

There is an alternative, corn-based product called "zein" that, according to the linked WP article at least, "may be labeled as 'confectioner's glaze.'" According to an email I received from someone in the Hashgacha industry, zein coatings, unlike shellac coatings, "generally do not contain alcohol." I don't know if this was the product used in your candy; ...


5

It would seem not from Trumas haDeshen P/K 105. The case in the end where he brings achzarius seems to be talking in a case where there were tamer options. Dead worms just won't catch fish. Although if your going for lake trout, mini-marshmallows work great!


5

An interesting question, and answer. It is worrisome to argue with the Gra about the different meanings of words, particularly after the famous (apocryphal?) story of him ordering lashes for the maskil who asserted to him that gila, rina, ditza, chedva, etcetera, were all complete synonyms. But after all, Ibn Ezra said: ודע כי המלות הם כגופות והטעמים הם ...


4

1) Check the Star-K's guide to insect checking, appropriately named: http://www.checkforinsects.com/ 2) Here is a Tu Bishvat guide for this year (5771), based on the sefer of R' Moshe Vaye: http://www.jerusalemkoshernews.com/wp-content/uploads/shvat_5771_english.pdf.


4

Reb Moshe in Iggras Moshe (חושן משפט חלק ב' סימן מ''ז) says if it is disgusting and or the creature ruins food,or mosquitoes who bother the person the answer is YES. Reb Moshe in an Illustration of his Tzidkus (righteousness) adds of course you should try not do it by hand instead with fly traps and the like because killing by hand desensitizes you and ruins ...


4

My guess is that it's a bug issue. Yuck. If one bug was pureed (or cooked, assuming cooking breaks apart the bug) with several cups of berries, the ground-up bug is nullified ("batel") 1:60 by volume and you can eat the puree. This minute quantity of non-kosher ingredient, which isn't a flavoring, coloring, stabilizer, or enzyme, is not a problem. ...


4

Use dryer sheets. I personally use Bounce brand sheets. Hang one for every 10 cubic feet or so, in a very bee infested area. You probably won't need that many though. Adjust according to bee count. (PS. With the dryer sheets hung on some of the decorations, we actually leave honey out. Its amazing!


4

Lately, I've heard a lesson from R. Avrohom Kuperman about this topic (what a coincidence!), and he finally told that it is forbidden. The line of thinking that it should be permitted (as you presented it in the question) is correct, but! We only allow to make melachot (actions) that you enjoy from the melacha itself. But in this case of killing insects you ...


4

According to Halacha we follow Rav Sheishes's view (bechoros 7b) who holds like Rabbe Yaakov (the Tannah) that the reason honey is kosher (even if the bee extracts part of its flesh into the honey as part of the process - Rabeinu Gershom) is a Gzeiras Hakosuv (by Hashem's command) and not like the opinion who says that the reason for its permissiblity is ...


4

This depends on the Hashgacha. Some Hashgachot on broccoli are only signing off on the purposefully present ingredients and processing equipment, but are not addressing the requirement for Bedika (Triangle-K for example on a lot of frozen produce (See here)). Others are signing off that they indeed already performed a Bedika (typically via Chazaka) and ...


3

The laws regarding ever min hachai apply only to domestic and wild land mammals and birds. This is because ever min hachai only applies where there is a distinction/difference made in the Torah between an animal's flesh and its blood. (see Rambam, Laws of Kings 9). The Torah does not make this distinction concerning the Sheretz animals as well as other ...


3

The M"B in simon 627,30 writes that one is not allowed to carry a dead body out on yom tov, even if having a dead body in your house bothers you, even if he is a kohen and is therefore not allowed to go into his own house, even though carrying on yom tov is one of the malachos that we say mitoch, the reason for this is because we only say mitoch on a ...


3

Somebody just drew a beraita to my attention (Shabbat 107b), which I think might answer my question. In a discussion that concerns whether or not lice spontaneously generate, Rabbi Eliezer's opinion is brought to the effect that one who kills a louse on Shabbat is as liable as had he killed a camel. Rabbi Yehoshua disagrees, saying that one is permitted to ...


3

While it goes without saying that practical rulings need a more authoritative answer, It seems that lice are a problem and must be removed but once you have done due diligence that is sufficient. שלחן ערוך יורה דעה קצח:מז מין כנים שדבוקים בבשר ונושכים בעור במקום שיער ונדבוקים בחוזק בבשר צריך להסירן ע"י חמין ולגורדן בצפורן ואם אינו יכול להסירן ...


2

As always, CYLOR. But here's what I found while looking around the web: From here: 330. The outside leaves of lettuce which are not fit for eating may be taken off on Shabbos in order to reach the good leaves, provided that this is done just before the meal. Lettuce leaves may be examined on Shabbos to make sure there are no insects on them. Insects ...


2

Your average bug is probably not much bigger than a half a centimeter. That means its volume is 0.125 cm^3. Assuming a bug is roughly the same density as water, a bug should weigh around 125mg. 60 times the weight of a bug would be roughly 7.5 grams. Most pots contain more food then that. I did it in weight because it is easier to appreciate weight ...


2

There's a new booklet being distributed (not very widely) by someone in Bnei Brak. In the front material has a very long letter by Rav Moshe Sternbuch shlita, which argues very strongly against bnei Torah wearing Ptil Tekhelet. Some of the reasons given sound a bit surprising to me (i.e. were beyond my limited understanding); one of them was this Zohar about ...


2

This website says (I think it's a book): אולם חיי בעלי חיים אינם יקרים כל כך, והעיקר הוא שלא לגרום להם צער. לכן אדם שיש לו חתול או כלב שסובלים ממחלה קשה, או שנפגעו על ידי מכונית, ואין להם סיכוי להבריא, וניכר עליהם שהם מתייסרים מאוד – במצב כזה עדיף להמיתם בדרך שאינה מכאיבה כדי למנוע מהם צער וסבל. If an animal is badly injured and they are in intense ...


2

http://www.yutorah.org/lectures/lecture.cfm/756889/Dr.%20Harvey%20Babich/Spiders%20and%20webs:%20their%20halachos%20and%20biology Rabbi Yehoshua Neuwirth (1989) in section (23:9), “Housekeeping and use of domestic facilities on Shabbos and Yom Tov,” codified the following halachos. “Cobwebs on furniture or some other movable article may be removed, ...


2

we used dryer sheets taped to the inside of the walls. we labeled them annanei ha'kavod and they seemed to do a pretty good job keeping out both mosquitos and bees. Here's some of the science behind it


2

Rashi to Gen. 7:14, citing Chullin 139b (bottom), points out that locusts are included in the phrase צפור כל כנף, "birds of every kind of wing." (To be precise, the Gemara there explains that צפור means kosher birds, and כל כנף means non-kosher birds plus locusts. Incidentally, then, that also indicates that the description in Gen. 1:22 of G-d creating עוף ...


2

(As with any practical halachic question, please consult with your own rabbi.) I. See אור יצחק by יצחק עבאדי here : http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=1525&pgnum=258 He allows such a netting. II. A slightly different question is found here: http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49009&pgnum=200 The question is dealing with an open area ...


1

My last answer wasn't clear, so although I am loath to rewrite answers that have been voted on already, I'll try to make this a bit clearer. The Talmud has two opinions as to why bee honey is Kosher. Only one of them relies on the way in which bees make honey. The other says it is a "gezeras hakasuv" - an arbitrary distinction made in the Torah - which ...



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