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Besides the fact that a mohel is performing the bris in order to bring the baby into the covenant, and must handle it as a religious ritual, there are also differences in the medical procedure. The minimum amount required for a bris is more than that required for a surgical circumcision. There are also problems involved with the clamps that surgeons use. A ...


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There was a Brith Milah for girls amongst one Jewish group, though there is no way to know whether or not this practice was of Jewish origin, or was of some African pagan origin that infiltrated the Jewish community. The Ethiopian Beta Israel community had a tradition of female circumcision. i don't know if there was a celebration marking the occassion, or ...


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The answer to that question is more difficult than appears at first glance. One might have be said "gloves for snakes? combs for hairless?" One of the assumptions made by the question is that Brit milah is a supplement. If it is lacking, this is an under privilege. But following the Rambam (the Guide for the Perplexes III, 49), it is as a quasi-amputation. ...


0

There actually is a naming ceremony for girls, called zeved habat. Zeved is a gift (cf. Lea's naming of Zevulun in Bereshit 30:20). It is a way to express' parents hakarat hatov (gratitude) to God for the gift of a girl. This is quite common in Sephardic communities in France (personal experience) and surely elsewhere as well. There is a traditional prayer ...



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