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10

You've already cited the relevant source, but maybe it's worth seeing the Shulchan Arukh (YD 264:1) inside: הכל כשרים למול אפי' עבד אשה וקטן וערל ישראל שמתו אחיו מחמת מילה ואם יש ישראל גדול שיודע למול הוא קודם לכלם (וי"א דאשה לא תמול וכן נוהגין להדר אחר איש).‏ All can circumcise, even a slave or a woman or a child or an uncircumcised Jew. And if ...


9

Normally the circumcision preformed by a physician is sufficient to meet the physical requirements of "milah" (circumcision), nevertheless a process known as "hatafas dam bris" (הטפת דם ברית) is necessary (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 268:1). In this process the Mohel draws a ritual drop of blood from the place of circumcision for the sake of the covenant. It ...


6

B'reishis Rabba (90:6) indicates that Yosef's decree was designed to provide the Egyptians not only with life in this world, via physical sustenance, but with life in the World to Come which they could merit via circumcision. The Y'fei To'ar commentary (ad loc. and on 91:5) explains this by saying that the Egyptians were steeped in sexual immorality, of ...


5

Sefer Asia - page 244 and page 245 brings different stories quoted by Rabbi Chaim Miller of such situations. Amongst those quoted that urged giving a name prior to a Bris in order to be able to have a name to Daven for were Rabbi Yechezkel Levenstein Zatzal, The Ozorover Rabbi Zatzal, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal, Rabbi Eliezer Man Shach Zatzal, and the ...


5

One explanation, given by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, paraphrased here, is that he thought his position as viceroy made them in a subservient position and obligated in circumcision just like all Jewish slaves. Another explanation that I saw once (don't remember where) is that he wanted to lessen the animosity towards his family (he was preparing the situation ...


4

The Aruch HaShulchan writes (Y.D. 265:38): וכתבו במנהגים שמלין קודם "עלינו", ואין חולצין התפילין עד אחר המילה (ש"ך סעיף קטן כ"ד). וגם אומרים פיוטים (שם). ואצלינו לא נהגו בפיוטים, וכן למול קודם "עלינו" אין נוהגים, וכן בחליצת התפילין, משום דעל פי רוב אין מלין בבית הכנסת רק בבית המילה. ולכן גם כשמלים לפרקים בבית הכנסת אין המנהג כן.‏ That the custom ...


3

In short, one of the requirements for a male convert is to enter the covenant of Abraham as the Jews did in the desert (after leaving Egypt) from where we learn the requirements of conversion To enter the covenant of Abraham an action needs to be made (specifically if you were not born jewish) in perfect circumstances the foreskin needs to be removed ...


3

The Taz asks this question in his Divrei Dovid and answers that Yosef had not actually attempted to have the Egyptians circumcise themselves, he was merely proving to them to what extent they were required to heed his every command. Then afterwards there was no circumcision carried out.


2

The other answers seems interesting. However, IIRC, we were advised NOT to name our 1st born son until the brit which was about 4 months after he was born. (Yes, he was a "miracle" baby who's now a miracle adult. Father's biased love, no?? I'm allowed!) The only ones confused by our policy were the non-Jewish hospital doctors and nurses. For "Mi Sheberach", ...


2

As to your first question -- it's the 19th chapter of Tractate Shabbat (starting on page 130); known as "Rabbi Eliezer d'Milah."


2

See this article regarding the ceremony itself. Near the beginning of the article, it states that non-Jews may attend a brit. As a matter of fact, I invited the CEO of my company, a non-Jew to my 1st son's brit. (It was well-worth the gift that he gave, afterwards, but that wasn't my incentive ;-) As for participating, IIRC, my rav mentioned that there is ...


2

I've never, ever heard of such a thing (yuck!) and it wouldn't surprise me if the sources are distorted. But nonetheless, let's look at this from a halachic angle. Kesubos 60a: הוא טמא ואין דם מהלכי שתים טמא אלא טהור ואמר רב ששת אפילו מצות פרישה אין בו לא קשיא הא דפריש הא דלא פריש וחלופא בדם כדתניא דם שעל גבי ככר גוררו ואוכלו שבין השינים מוצצו ואינו ...


2

The Talmud derives from a verse (B'reishis 21:12) that only some of Yitzchak's offspring would be considered Israelites (though this future nation was not given the name "Israel" yet, as Ya'akov was not yet even born). This verse excludes Esav. The Talmud states specifically that descendents of Esav are not obligated in circumcision (Sanhedrin 59b). From a ...


2

I remember a medrash that because Eisav was so red, they thought that he would bleed too much if the circimcised him at eight days old (sakanas nefashot). As a result, they delayed until he was older. When he became older, he absolutely refused to become circumcized and his loss of the birthright cause him to be rejected. The mitzvah of circumcision became ...


2

The minhag isn't explicit in the Torah. However, the connection between a young tree and brit milah does have Torah basis-- the unusual root ע.ר.ל. Indeed, in Vayikra Rabbah 25:6, Rav Huna bar Kappara explains that Avraham learned the place of brit milah from the Gezeirah Shava. As per your question about the validity of the minhag, it needs no De'Orayta ...


2

To paraphrase this article on the seforimblog: Raphael Shuchat notes that in a manuscript version of the Aderet Eliyahu text there is an important addition: ואפילו הגוים הדרים בא"י צריכים לקיים כל המצוות, לפי שכל המצוות תלויים בארץ ישראל But even with this addition the text is still very difficult, and no one has been able to find a source for the ...


1

No, the obligation is only on born-Jews (i.e. descendants of Jacob) and converts to Judaism; it's not tied to the land. Rambam, Kings and their Wars Ch. 10: המילה--נצטווה בה אברהם וזרעו בלבד, שנאמר "אתה וזרעך אחריך, לדורותם" (בראשית יז,ט). יצא זרעו של ישמעאל, שנאמר "כי ביצחק, ייקרא לך זרע" (בראשית כא,יב). ויצא עשיו, שהרי יצחק אמר ליעקוב "וייתן לך את ...


1

The word shem (name) means the essence of an item. Thus we see when Adam gave "names" to the animals he recognized their essences and integrated them into his view of the world. Thus, just as the entry into the bris was because of the essence of the mitzvah and not any external influence, so too should the other main mitzvos and critical moments of life ...


1

The Talmud in Chaggiga 3a says that Avraham was the first convert. Tosfos there ties that in with being circumcised. There are other opinions of when this started (such as when he recognized G-d). Here is a slew of sources which discuss this concept, including several that explicitly link the Talmud in Nedarim 31a with conversion and draw the conclusion ...


1

The word shem (name) means the essence of an item. Thus we see when Adam gave "names" to the animals he recognized their essences and integrated them into his view of the world. Thus, just as the entry into the bris was because of the essence of the mitzvah and not any external influence, so too should the other main mitzvos and critical moments of life ...


1

Assuming one was bothered by the question, one could answer based on the Rambam's text of this declaration. Rather than the more familiar formula of כשם שנכנס לברית כן יכנס לתורה לחופה ולמעשים טובים (Just as he entered the covenant so may he enter the wedding canopy and good deeds), in Hil. Milah (3:2) he writes: וְאִם הָיוּ שָׁם עוֹמְדִין אוֹמְרִים ...


1

This circumstance happened to a family in my community. The baby was born with a health problem that required deferring the bris for 6 months. Their rabbi told them to name the baby following the same procedure that is followed for baby girls, simply replacing feminine pronouns in the mi shebeirach with masculine ones.


1

I think the question confuses two different things the nature of the brit mila itself vs. a medical circumcision the nature of the mohel vs. a doctor and the location of a brit mila (hospital vs. home/synagogue) So for the long-term record: A brit mila is not the same as a medical circumcision as routinely practiced in hospitals (e.g., this source says ...


1

Although not stated in scripture, is it possible that G-D commanded Moses not to circumcise the second generation until they had completed the 40 year trial in the desert because the first generation had broken covenant? This occurrence happened just after Joshua had the people swear loyalty to G-d and Joshua's leadership. They then "consecrated ...


1

This question is asked by the Toras Hamincha (a student of the Rashba) in his drashos (Lech L'cha drasha 8). Another student of the Rashba R. Yehoshua ibn Shu'aib writes that many have asked this question (parshas vayeira and drasha to Parshas Tzav / Shabbs Hagadol). He writes that some answered that Avraham refrained from doing so because the merit for a ...



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