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20

the question is more cultural than religious. The notion of mayo and white bread plays to the stereotype of the WASPish cuisine as opposed to the traditional eastern-european influenced foods which would have one expect traditional deli fare of pastrami on rye with mustard and maybe a pickle. the issue of dietary law is not at play here.


12

It is definitely allowed. The custom not to speak between washing and hamotzi is nowhere near as strict as the requirement not to speak between hamotzi and eating the bread. The Gemara in Brachot (40a) that you remember permits you to speak between hamotzi and eating for essential purposes ("take some bread," "bring salt/seasoning," "feed the animals"). ...


10

From what I can tell, either way you accent this word is probably fine. My understanding, based on Biblical grammar My understanding is that the accent in this case goes on the 'mo' syllable, due to the rule of "nasog achor." This rule says that when multi-syllabic Word A is followed (without disjunctive cantillation) by Word B, and Word B has an accent ...


8

I'll ask it even stronger: What if someone is feeding you and you have no intention of using your hands to interact with the food at all? Well, the Shulchan Aruch rules in OC 163:2 that in such a case, only the one eating must wash his hands and not the one feeding. He doesn't mention that one would not say a bracha and the implication is that it's the same ...


8

A straightforward answer is provided by the Meiri (Beis HaB'chira, B'rachos 35a) and echoed by the Shita M'kubeztes (Brachos 35a), who write that the phrasing for each is based on verses pertaining to each (as mentioned in Michoel's answer and in Shalom's answer). Further, the Meiri indicates that borei p'ri ha'adama would also be suitable for bread, ...


7

The basic idea is that the first splash of water becomes tamei from touching your hands (since they themselves are deemed tamei - that's the reason we have to wash in the first place); the second splash, then, makes the water left on your hands tahor. If your hands were dirty, you actually need three splashes: one to remove the dirt, and the second and third ...


6

From here: The primary reason for requiring this washing is that in times of old (and again shortly when Mashiach arrives) before Kohanim were allowed to partake of Terumah they had to wash their hands to ensure they weren't impure. In order for them to get in the habit of doing so, the Chazal instituted this washing for all of Klal Yisroel, not just for ...


6

Sefardim make a mezonos on matzoh (except on Pesach) which is considered bread by Ashkenazim (and Sefardim on Pesach). So there you have it: Mezonos? Bread.


6

The Shita Mekubetzes to Brochos 35a ask this, and explains that the choice of wording for the two blessings is in accordance with phrases found previously in Tanach - the blessing for bread is based on the verse (Tehillim 104:14) "להוציא לחם מן הארץ", whereas the blessing for vegetables comes from the verse (Devarim 26:2) "מראשית כל פרי האדמה".


5

There is a kabbalic concept known as the "ten crowns of impurity". Thus we lay down ten pieces of chametz to represent those ten crowns. See R. Zev Wolf haLevi of Zitomir, Ohr haMeir (vaYikra: Pesach), quoting Arizal in Pri Etz Chaim (Mitzvos, end of ch. 4). (It is well known that the removal of chametz from our homes symbolizes the removal of the Evil ...


5

You can't eat without drinking! That is the idea of drinks being secondary to the meal and exempt from a bracha. (Psak of the [Shulchan Aruch 174:7][1], see there for the machlokes). An exception is wine which, although it is part of the meal, retains its bracha because of its prominence (SA OC 174:1). There is a debate on the practical usage of hard ...


5

R' Shlomo Alkabetz writes that it is hinted at by the Gemara's expression about "one who leaves ten [pieces of chametz]..." (Pesachim 10a, bottom). (Cited in Shaar Hakollel 48:3)


5

With regards to mzonos in general, The Alter Rebbe writes in Hilchos Birckas Hanehenin (in the Siddur) it says: 1) If he eats less than 4 eggs and is full, wash on other bread. 2) If he eats less than 6 eggs, then if he is not full, one could say a mzonos. If he is full, he must say a bracha on this bread. 3) If he eats 6 eggs to half an Isarron, and he ...


5

There is much controversy on the legitimacy of Mezonos "bread". Both Rabbi Pinchos Bodner and Rabbi Forst discuss this topic at length in their books (Halachos of Brochos and Laws of B'rachos, respectively). The latter seems to conclude along the lines of jutky's answer, but there are various qualifications that the ingredients of the bread must meet... ...


5

When you get a meal on the plane there is sometimes a "mezonos" sticker on the roll. But you should really make a "mezonos" if you eat just the roll itself without other things, but since there you also eat garnish some poskim say you make a "המוציא" on the roll.


5

In Hayom Yom (22 Adar I) the Rebbe quotes the Rebbe Rasha”b (Meheirah Yishamah 5648) as saying, “The obligation to eat Shalosh Seudos is learned from the Passuk “Hayom Lo”, therefore we don’t need to eat bread, but one must taste something. As Rabbi Yossi said (Talmud, Shabbos 118b) “May my portion be among those who eat Shalosh Seudos”. So Minhag Chabad is ...


5

The Aruch haShulchan 158:1-2 brings the 2 main reasons: To protect against defiling Teruma (on a rabbinical level), we are careful to wash for regular food as well. Cleanliness leads a person to purity and holiness. Based on where the Torah says "v'hiskadishchem"- sanctify yourselves (Vayikra 11:44), we wash our hands and dry them prior to eating. There ...


5

To build upon JXG's answer, the Halachah is clearly that you are not allowed to speak unnecessarily in between Berachoth and that for which the Berachah was recited. On the other hand, one may speak in between two separate actions that each have their Berachoth, even if one action is related to the other and speaking is to be limited. Case #1: Like most ...


5

It seems that the Taz is saying that one should object to feeding a vicious dog a loaf of bread with a needle in it, as a way of disposing of it. Rather, the proper way to kill the dog is with poison. It seems that, according to the Taz, giving the dog a loaf of bread with a needle in it is not, in this instance, a violation of tzaar baalei chaim nor of bal ...


5

One who has a bandage on his hand which is not easily removable should wash as much of his hand as possible (even if that amount zero) and take care that any skin which could not be washed not directly touch the bread. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 162:10, Magen Avraham sk 18, Mishna Brurah sk 68 and particularly 69 It would seem that the appropriate blessing ...


5

Proper procedure? I don't think there is a preference. Hamotzi does not exempt wine ever (Shulchan Aruch OC 174:1) and if you drank wine before the bread it continues to exempt wine drunk after the bread (:4). Also, the after blessing on the bread exempts the wine, even if wine was only drunk before the bread, and certainly if it was drunk during the meal ...


5

If it is Kosher pastrami and Kosher bread and Kosher mayonnaise there is nothing wrong. It is 100% permissible for one who keeps Kosher to eat.


5

There seems to be no known source for feeding the fish at Tashlich. As already noted, those who mention it then to be opposed to it. But the fact is that it is mentioned - and its origins seem to be almost as old as the Minhag of Tashlich. Regarding feeding the fish at Tashlich we could learn from the Aruch HaShulchan's opinion regarding feeding the birds ...


4

There's a great story involving R' Aharon Lichtenstein on an El-Al flight trying to get a permanent cup (which is a subject for another post) to wash his hands to eat his meal, which contained a "Mezonos roll". The flight attendant told him he didn't need to wash, and when he managed to obtain a cup and started washing, the same flight attendant adamantly ...


4

Feed it to the birds, or wrap it in a bag prior to throwing into the garbage. http://torahsearch.com/page.cfm/2930


4

As the Baal HaTanya writes (166:1): "But if one is sitting and not doing any action that would distract him from hamotzei, even though he is waiting for a long time, and even if he converses a little, there is no concern since the table is set in front of him and his intention is to eat; that he can converse is on the condition that he doesn't get into a ...


4

"Borei Minei Meznonot" ("who creates forms of sustenance") is the bracha (blessing) made before foods that aren't "bread", but are still made primarily of wheat, barley, spelt, oats, or rye. Pasta and cheerios, for instance, are "mezonot", not "hamotzee" (bread). Afterwards, instead of full bentching, there's a much shorter blessing, Al HaMichya (it's ...


4

Based on the Divrei Yirmiyahu's commentary on Rambam Hilchot Brachot, Chapter 7, Halacha 5, it appears that the Baal HaBayit (who is cutting the bread), is supposed to place a piece of bread in front of everyone sitting at the table. He says that by doing so, the Baal HaBayit is honoring his guests. Placing it directly into the recipients hand would be like ...


4

http://jcarrot.org/whats-so-jewish-about-bagels There is more than one answer to this question, the most popular attributing the creation of bagels to a Jewish baker living in 1683 Vienna. According to folklore, this unnamed man invented the bagel as a tribute to King John III Sobieski of Poland.


4

Tif'eret Yosef OC 14 asks your specific question, concluding that the "bread" would be considered pat habaah bikisanin and not get a hamotzi under ordinary circumstances. (I do not expect this ruling is universally agreed upon. Compare, for instance, his reasoning to Aruch haShulchan OC 158:6 and note the ill-defined boundary in Mishna Berura 168 sk 33. See ...



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