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6

According to the Art Scroll Siddur bend the knees at kor'im (bend the knee), bend at the waist at mishtachavim (bow) and straighten up after modim (acknowledge) before lifnei melelech. I do not know where Rabbi Nosson Scherman got the original psak that this is the method. It is also the way that I was taught to daven in cheder (lo those many years ago) but ...


6

The Rosh and Chizkuni (in his second explanation) and Daas Z'kenim answer that the maidservants' sons didn't bow, as they thought that they, as freemen, were more important than their mothers. That's why it says "bowed" in the feminine: only women bowed. [Presumably "and their children" in the verse refers to approaching.] Chizkuni's first explanation is ...


5

Even if you didn't bow on purpose, you still fulfilled your obligation (Rambam Tefillah 5:1).


5

While I've yet to see a source that says that one shouldn't bow, sources that say that one should include the following (in rough chronological order): • Emek Berakha (§40, here), by R' Avraham ben Shabbetai Horowitz, with notes by his son, the Shnei Luchot haBrit. No reason is provided for the bowing, save that the whole host of heaven is listening. • ...


4

In North Korea the ruling class is (strangely) treated like a deity according to this Wikipedia article similar to Nevuchadzezzar and the idol he built. As such, bowing is assur (even without prostration - pishut yadaim veraglayim). Even removing one's hat in deference is assur (cf Yoreh Deah 150:3 Rema) If one is bowing down to a person who is not treated ...


3

One is allowed to bow before a king, even a secular king. Halacha does not forbid bowing to a king or, by extension, an important official in the king's court. In Tanach, we find a number of instances when prominent Jews bowed to kings, such as the prophet Natan bowing to David (Melachim 1:1:23) and Yosef's brothers bowing to Yosef (Bereishit 42:6). ...


3

We bend the knees during the words "ואנחנו כורעים" and bow during the word "ומשתחוים" (Shulchan Shlomo: Siman 132, Sif 2 - as cited in sefer "Ishei Yisrael"). Furthermore, it is important to note that the Rema (in Siman 132, Sif 2) teaches that after reciting the phrase "שהם משתחוים להבל וריק ומתפללים אל אל לא יושיע" (which notes how others pray to their ...


2

I found explanations in Rite and Reason: 1050 Jewish Customs and Their Sources By Shemuʼel Pinḥas Gelbard (p. 129). I am summarizing: The 1st answer mentions that the Torah should be raised slightly at the name of Hashem (God) in each of the 3 verses, Shema, Echad Elokeinu and Gadlu. This is because we want to elevate God's name. (My opinion - this answer ...


2

FWIW, there are some cases, e.g., in מודים, where even if one is not saying it one must bow along with everyone else, so as not to appear to disagree with what is being said (נראה ככופר). Source is in משנה ברורה and ערוך השלחן, both in אורח חיים, סימן ק״ט: ערוך השלחן: ...שצריך לשחות עם הציבור ב"מודים", שלא יהא נראה ככופר למי שהציבור משתחוים לו ...


1

Prostration was common throughout the Biblical period and remained daily practice for many Jews into the medieval period, especially in Muslim countries. Maimonides in Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Tefila 5:13-14 discusses prostration in the context of the post-Amidah suplications/tachanun. He seems to be writing descriptively (this is what Jews do) rather than ...


1

According to the Art Scroll Siddur bend the knees at kor'im (bend the knee), bend at the waist at mishtachavim (bow) and straighten up after modim (acknowledge) before lifnei melelech. Of course this is just the instruction posted in the siddur. I do not know where Rabbi Nosson Scherman obtained the particular psak that this is the correct methodology. I do ...


1

In the shuls that I have gone to on Rosh Hashana (Ashkenaz US) it appears that people bow in the same way as they do during the aleinu at the end of services. This is from what I was taught many years ago and observation in shul.



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