Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Well, here's what comes to mind. Bowing is not reserved for G-d. There are many cases in the Bible when prominent Jews bowed to kings such as the prophet Natan bowing to David (Melachim 1:1:23) and Yosef’s brothers bowing to Yosef (Breishit 42:6). Even Avraham (Breishit 18:2) bowed to strangers whom he suspected of being idolaters (Rashi to verse 4). ...


14

The Mahara"l of Prauge, in his commentary to Megilas Esther called Ohr Chadash, (after offering the more basic suggestion that this denotes something Mordechai would do on a constant basis), explains that even when Mordechai had an option to use an alternate route, he would make a point of going in front of Haman and not bowing down. The Ohr Hachayim ...


10

Ohr Chadash - Maharal M'Prag asks this question and answers that Mordechai intentionally made sure to be in the areas where Haman was going to show he was not going to bow down. לא יכרע, זהו אף שהיה יכול מרדכי ללכת בדרך אחרת שלא יהיה פוגע בו ולא יכעס המן


8

According to the Beit Yosef (OC 123; citing Rav Hai Gaon), the custom is based on the idea that the tefillos correspond to the tamid offerings. When the kohen would go up to the altar, he would go up on the right side, go around, and descend on the left side. We face left first, then right, because we are orienting ourselves according to the Shechina's ...


8

Piskei T'shuvos (115:2), citing Maharil, writes that whist striking the chest during s'lach lanu, one should bow his head slightly forward.


8

Yes there is a source. It is MB simon 113 sk 12. Almost the same text is used in Kitzur Shulchan Oruch 18(11). The translation says, "When a person recites Boruch, he should bend the knee, and when he says Attoh, he should bow to the extent that the vertebrae of the spine protrude. He should also bend his head. Before he recites G-d's name, he should return ...


7

As far as I know (there may be variant customs): In Aleinu: kneel at כורעים, prostrate (head and hands to the ground, while still kneeling - essentially, a fetal position) at ומשתחוים, stay that way until הקדוש ברוך הוא, and then get up. In the Avodah: kneel at כורעים, prostrate at ומשתחוים, and stay that way until לעולם ועד. [In all cases, if it's a ...


7

Dayan Raskin analyzes this custom here. Please read the source for a lot more details than I'm going into here. Why we turn for Boi Be'Shalom: Pri Megadim (262:S"K3): This is instead of going out of the synagogue, as brought by the Magen Avraham Mishna Berurah (262:S"K10): We turn to face the door as if we were receiving/welcoming a great person Ta'amei ...


6

The Rambam says that an important person is not allowed to fall on his face unless he is as great of a tzaddik as Yehoshua. The Aruch Hashulchan says that that the reason is because if he is not answered immediately, he will be embarrassed. This is why it says that even a great man is allowed to do proper "falling on the face" in a private setting. The ...


6

Generally a Dojo has a soft mat on which you kneel, and the bowing is done as a form of greeting to a person. As long as you are not kneeling on a stone floor, it's not strictly a problem. (Halacha commentary 14) As for fears of Avodah Zarah in regards to Kung Fu, you should in general not be exposed to anything. If you are exposed to concepts and ...


6

Rivivos Efraim 3:421 brings reasonings that woman should bow down on Yom Kippur and reasonings that woman should not bow down on Yom Kippur. He discusses whether woman bowed down in the temple and says that they did not as they were not there, however had a lady been in the courtyard of the temple and heard the Kohain Gadol say Hashem's name they would be ...


6

The Babylonian Talmud (Yoma 53b) states that one should bow to one's left first: המתפלל צריך שיפסיע שלש פסיעות לאחוריו ואחר כך יתן שלום ואם לא עשה כן ראוי לו שלא התפלל ומשום שמעיה אמרו שנותן שלום לימין ואחר כך לשמאל שנאמר מימינו אש דת למו ואומר יפול מצדך אלף ורבבה מימינך מאי ואומר וכי תימא אורחא דמילתא היא למיתב בימין ת"ש יפול מצדך אלף ורבבה מימינך רבא ...


6

According to the Art Scroll Siddur bend the knees at kor'im (bend the knee), bend at the waist at mishtachavim (bow) and straighten up after modim (acknowledge) before lifnei melelech. I do not know where Rabbi Nosson Scherman got the original psak that this is the method. It is also the way that I was taught to daven in cheder (lo those many years ago) but ...


5

While I've yet to see a source that says that one shouldn't bow, sources that say that one should include the following (in rough chronological order): • Emek Berakha (§40, here), by R' Avraham ben Shabbetai Horowitz, with notes by his son, the Shnei Luchot haBrit. No reason is provided for the bowing, save that the whole host of heaven is listening. • ...


5

The source of the Rambam's ruling is Taanis 14b: אמר ר' אלעזר אין אדם חשוב רשאי ליפול על פניו אלא אם כן נענה כיהושע בן נון שנאמר (יהושע ז, י) ויאמר ה' אל יהושע קום לך למה זה אתה נופל על פניך R. Elazar said: A important person should not fall upon his face unless he is confident that he will be answered like Yehoshua, as it is written, And the ...


5

Biur Halacha 113 (hakoreah) says it is based on Divrei haYamim I 29:20: וַיֹּאמֶר דָּוִיד לְכָל-הַקָּהָל, בָּרְכוּ-נָא אֶת-יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם; וַיְבָרְכוּ כָל-הַקָּהָל, לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֵי אֲבֹתֵיהֶם, וַיִּקְּדוּ וַיִּשְׁתַּחֲווּ לַיהוָה, וְלַמֶּלֶךְ. And David said to all the congregation: 'Now bless the LORD your God.' And all the congregation blessed the ...


4

As HodofHod said, we bow in the direction of Jerusalem, and that is also the wall on which we place the ark. I was taught that this means that if you're at the sides of the room (with the ark in the center), you don't bow toward the ark; you bow toward east. In some congregations I see everybody bow toward the ark, forming basically a semi-circle, but I ...


4

Vayikra 26:1 says: You shall not make idols for yourselves, nor shall you set up a statue or a monument for yourselves. And in your land you shall not place a pavement stone on which to prostrate yourselves, for I am the Lord, your God. This teaches us (See Chinuch, Mitvah 349) that one is not allowed to prostrate oneself on stone outside the Beit ...


4

The Rambam is referencing a Gemara (Megillah 22b) which says: אמר רבי אלעזר, אין אדם חשוב רשאי ליפול על פניו אלא אם כן נענה כיהושע בן נון, דכתיב +יהושע ז:י+ ויאמר ה' אל יהושע קם לך [למה זה אתה נפל על פניך]‏ Rabbi Elazar said: An important person is not allowed to fall on his face unless he is [sure to be] answered like Yehoshua bin Nun, as it ...


3

As a young man I was taught by my rabbi, though I don't remember the source, that when one comes out of the bow one should lift one's head first (simultaneously while saying HaShem's name), so that it looks like one is looking up towards heaven, rather than looking like one is lifting something heavy on one's back (as it was explained to me, when one carries ...


3

Shulchan Aruch (127:1): When the Shali'ach Tzibur reaches Modim, the Tzibur says Modim D'Rabanan and bows with him. They should not bow too much. Some say that one must bow also at the end of Modim D'Rabanan. It is good to be concerned for this opinion. Ramah: Some say all of Modim D'Rabanan in one bowing. This is the custom. Mishnah Berurah (5 and Bi'ur ...


3

The answer is that it isn't supposed to mean "And Mordechai will not bow and will not kneel," but it is supposed to mean, "And Mordechai would not bow and would not kneel." If it was in past tense, it would be "And Mordechai did not bow and did not kneel."


3

We bend the knees during the words "ואנחנו כורעים" and bow during the word "ומשתחוים" (Shulchan Shlomo: Siman 132, Sif 2 - as cited in sefer "Ishei Yisrael"). Furthermore, it is important to note that the Rema (in Siman 132, Sif 2) teaches that after reciting the phrase "שהם משתחוים להבל וריק ומתפללים אל אל לא יושיע" (which notes how others pray to their ...


3

In North Korea the ruling class is (strangely) treated like a deity according to this Wikipedia article similar to Nevuchadzezzar and the idol he built. As such, bowing is assur (even without prostration - pishut yadaim veraglayim). Even removing one's hat in deference is assur (cf Yoreh Deah 150:3 Rema) If one is bowing down to a person who is not treated ...


3

One is allowed to bow before a king, even a secular king. Halacha does not forbid bowing to a king or, by extension, an important official in the king's court. In Tanach, we find a number of instances when prominent Jews bowed to kings, such as the prophet Natan bowing to David (Melachim 1:1:23) and Yosef's brothers bowing to Yosef (Bereishit 42:6). ...


2

Most shuls face East and we turn to the West which is often the rear of the Shul. We bow by the words Boi Kalla, Boi Kalla - first time to the right second time to the left.


2

Beis Yosef (Orach Chaim 621) cites various sources in the Gemara that say that the people bowed and prostrated themselves each of the ten times that the Kohen Gadol uttered Hashem's Four-Lettered Name (three each for the confessions, and one when designating the goat for Hashem). On this basis, then, he states (following Avudraham) that the paragraph ...


2

Actually, Or Letzion is against it (although some question if this is really the opinion of Rav BenTzion Abba Shaul, see comments), and Yalkut Yosef (57:9 O"H) writes that those that do it have sources to rely on. I believe this custom has a source in the Ben Ish Hai though. HaRav Musafi Shelit"a (Q&A 3176) says because we can only bow where the Hachamim ...


2

The Maharal in Nesiv HaAvoda ch. 10 writes (copying bits and pieces because it is lengthy): אבל הפירוש כמו שאמרנו כי בכח הברכה הזאת הוא כל התפלה כי ברכה זאת נזכר שהוא יתברך אלהי אברהם אלהי יצחק ואלהי יעקב, והאבות הם השתלשלות העולם כי הם התחלה לעולם ובכח ההתהלה הוא הכל ובפרט ישראל אשר הם זרע האבות, ולפיכך בברכה זאת האדם קרוב אל השם יתברך ...


2

I found explanations in Rite and Reason: 1050 Jewish Customs and Their Sources By Shemuʼel Pinḥas Gelbard (p. 129). I am summarizing: The 1st answer mentions that the Torah should be raised slightly at the name of Hashem (God) in each of the 3 verses, Shema, Echad Elokeinu and Gadlu. This is because we want to elevate God's name. (My opinion - this answer ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible