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2

The ArtScroll "Stone Edition" Pentateuch has spaces in it to record family members' yahrzeits. I've no doubt this is in order that purchasers might implement the custom you mention.


2

I have a set of Mishnah Brurah from my great grandfather (I use his picture in my signature) with the Chofetz Chaim's notation "mugah" (checked) written in it. The problem with heirloom seforim is that, if they are used to learn from, they will get tattered from being used so much, no matter how careful one is. If they are in fine condition, that could mean ...


2

All types of religious articles are commonly passed onto descendants - candle sticks, tallitot, tefillin, etc. Books are probably the most important items to pass on. My father left me his siddur and my grandfather left me his set of Ramba"m's Mishneh Torah. (I don't recall the publisher, but it's a pretty well-known set. Has a tan front with black siding. ...


3

This is from an old Jewish Polish folk tale. A man's house is too crowded, so the rabbi tells him to bring in all his animals, one species at a time. When there are no more to being in, he tells him to take them all out. All of a sudden, the house feels so much roomier, despite staying exactly the same. Links: ...


8

Yes. Here is a page from Eichlers full of Jewish comic books


-1

you're allowed to enter a church in order to gain understanding about the differences between Christianity and Judaism, according to Rabbi Riskin. Otherwise, it's forbidden. If it's understanding you wish to gain, and it's permitted for avodah zarah, I can't imagine Islam (which isn't "avodah zarah" technically) being off limits. At worse, it is the same as ...


1

The Outsider's Guide to Orthodox Judaism by Rabbi Arnie Singer - Link: http://www.amazon.com/Outsiders-Guide-Orthodox-Judaism/dp/0615211364/



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