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The tags are probably not muktze machmat chesron kis. In order for something to attain that status of muktze, it usually must be quite valuable (ex. a brit milah knife, etc.) so that the only conceivable thing you could do with the object is either prohibited or just not use it at all. (Shulchan Aruch Siman 308.1) It appears to me however that it does fit ...


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For a Jewish translation of Nach (Tanach minus the Five Books of Moses) with a compendium of commentaries, I recommend the Judaica Press Prophets and Writings1. I have found that its English summary of commentaries on each verse reliably includes readable paraphrases or direct translations of the most interesting or useful comments of the classical ...


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As noted in this answer, the Stone Chumash is a good starting point. It brings classical Jewish commentaries, verse by verse. This is one example of a category. A chumash is an edition of the five books of torah with (Jewish) commentaries. Lots of editors have published them; the commentaries included vary. (A book that included all the commentaries ...


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Highly recommended is The Living Torah by the late Rabbi Arye Kaplan. It's translated into modern English - no thee, thy and thou. He brings numerous interpretations in the footnotes where available. He has broken each chapter into sub-chapters - each with its own heading. He brings lots of maps and charts and images. Apparently it's online here. ...


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You might want to check out the ArtScroll Stone Chumash (no, it's not written on rocks). It contains all of the Torah in Hebrew with a translation, plus Rashi in Hebrew. But what really makes it good for you is the rest of the commentary. They anthologize a whole bunch of the classic Rabbinic commentaries, in English. They of course cite whoever they are ...



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