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8

Highly recommended is The Living Torah by the late Rabbi Arye Kaplan. It's translated into modern English - no thee, thy and thou. He brings numerous interpretations in the footnotes where available. He has broken each chapter into sub-chapters - each with its own heading. He brings lots of maps and charts and images. Apparently it's online here. ...


7

For a Jewish translation of Nach (Tanach minus the Five Books of Moses) with a compendium of commentaries, I recommend the Judaica Press Prophets and Writings1. I have found that its English summary of commentaries on each verse reliably includes readable paraphrases or direct translations of the most interesting or useful comments of the classical ...


6

You might want to check out the ArtScroll Stone Chumash (no, it's not written on rocks). It contains all of the Torah in Hebrew with a translation, plus Rashi in Hebrew. But what really makes it good for you is the rest of the commentary. They anthologize a whole bunch of the classic Rabbinic commentaries, in English. They of course cite whoever they are ...


5

As noted in this answer, the Stone Chumash is a good starting point. It brings classical Jewish commentaries, verse by verse. This is one example of a category. A chumash is an edition of the five books of torah with (Jewish) commentaries. Lots of editors have published them; the commentaries included vary. (A book that included all the commentaries ...


4

R. David Cohen (of Cong. Gvul Yaavetz in Brooklyn) has a series of seforim consisting of unanswered questions titled ואם תאמר (I-IV, V, VI). The author of the Chelkas Yoav has a book of (103) unanswered questions called קבא דקשייתא.


4

You are probably looking for Challenge: Torah Views on Science and Its Problems, edited by R' Aryeh Carmell and Dr. Cyril Domb in association with the Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists, published by Feldheim in 1976 (1st edition) and 1988 (2nd edition).


3

Aruch Hashulchan Orach Chaim 14:13 quotes the rama that it is forbidden to read someone else's books without permission. However he goes on to say that just to look at it shortly is something which we permit. לעיין בעלמא נוהגים היתר


3

The Pines translation is the best. Better than the ibn Tibbon translation by far. Unless you are history scholar, there is no reason to ever need to read this version. If you want to study it in Hebrew, the only edition worth reading is the Qafih edition. That's actually true of any of the rambam's works. The best place to start is where the rambam says, ...


2

If you want used, also try ebay. There are a few Judaica sellers on there and you can get stuff relative inexpensively. This seller is the biggest.


2

The tags are probably not muktze machmat chesron kis. In order for something to attain that status of muktze, it usually must be quite valuable (ex. a brit milah knife, etc.) so that the only conceivable thing you could do with the object is either prohibited or just not use it at all. (Shulchan Aruch Siman 308.1) It appears to me however that it does fit ...


2

Someone asked this to Rav Meir Mazuz Shlita here: אשתי מורה ועושה תואר שני בתנ"ך במכללה דתית [מהזרם הציוני דתי]. במהלך אחד הקורסים, נתבקשו ע"י מרצה אחד, לקרוא מאמר של שפינוזה. וכן דברו שם על בקורת המקרא. כששאלה אשתי את המרצה [חובש הכיפה] שידוע שהרבנים אוסרים לשמוע דברים מסוג זה, אמר: איפה הרב עובדיה [שליט"א] פוסק שאסור? האם אפשר לקבל מקורות לאיסור? [גם ...


2

On the compilation of Bavli Talmud, see "The Formation of the Babylonian Talmud" by Jacob Neusner and on Yerushalmi, see "A Guide to the Jerusalem Talmud" by Heshey Zelcer. Both of them provide a valuable source to its world and composition. On the context, history and its sources see "The Sages (4 volumes)", by Rabbi Binyamin Lau. It covers many aspects of ...


2

For the sake of simplicity, I'll assume that the books in question are considered some form of 'Learning Torah'. Biographies of Rabbis are very likely a form of learning Torah (granted, definitely a 'lighter learning' than say, a Daf Gemara), and depending on how the history of the Holocaust is written, it could also be considered learning as well. For the ...


2

To provide a couple more examples: Da'as T'vunos by the Ramchal (mid-18th century)1 explores fundamental topics of Jewish thought in the style of a master-student dialogue between the intellect and the soul. Ammudei Beis Y'huda by Yehuda Hurwitz (1766)2 uses a narrative approach involving discussions between two Jewish sages and an intelligent aborigine ...


2

There is a slightly older series of books by R Ezriel Tauber in the same style of an older Rav teaching through questions and answers. Although the style is very readable, the answers are very profound. See the full list here and here, key ones I read and liked were Choose Life!: The Purpose of Creation as the Key to Happiness, Meaning, Life To Become ...


2

Proper respect for Jewish Holy books, as documented in Jewish Law: Holy Books are always placed right side up; not upside down. They need to be turned right-side up, if found otherwise. Holy Books are not to be placed - when open - on their print.(A popular way to keep the place when the book is open.) One does not place Holy Books inside other books as a ...


2

3 Enoch is known in Jewish tradition under the name Sefer Hekhaloth. It is part of a wider body of texts known as Hekhaloth literature. This book is now considered one of the primary texts of kabbalah though it is technically, like Sefer Yesirah, pre-kabbalah and subject to interpretations that don't necessitate a kabbalistic metaphysic. At the time it was ...


1

According to the listing from Wikipedia, it was written in the 13th century. It's author is unknown. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sefer_Nizzahon_Yashan The claim is that based on style of language, it probably originated in Germany. From the time frame, it sounds like it followed on the heels of the notorious 'Disputation of Paris' which took place ...


1

According to Wikipedia: Sefer Nizzahon Yashan (ספר ניצחון) "The (old) Book of Victory" is an anonymous 13th Century Jewish apologetic text originating in Germany. The name "old" (Hebrew yashan, Latin vetus) is attached to distinguish the work from Yom-Tov Lipmann-Muhlhausen of Prague's work of the same name, Sefer Nizzahon, written between 1401-1405. It is ...


1

Lehmanns have 12955 miscellaneous seforim and 1166 published by 'Oz VeHadar'. That doesn't count over 4000 in English. I cannot help on popularity.


1

Three more suggestions relevant to your quest R Meir Zvi Bergman's Gateway to the Talmud (artscroll) This is a wonderful introduction to the Talmud. This volume is only 154 pages, in easy to read font, so it is only a gate, but what a gate! It describes the historical development of Talmudic study, the differences between the Jerusalem and the ...


1

This is an active area of academic research. If you go to this website from UCL and search for "Talmud" you will find a list of books and articles on the subject, which form a reading list for a course. Of course, you won't expect these sources to agree with each other in all matters.


1

Rabbi Triebitz has a 20 part series on this, on Hashkafacircle, here. It should be noted that some of his ideas are non-standard.



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