Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The only question that I'm going to answer directly is number 2, since I heard directly from my Rebbi that it is 100% permissible (unfortunately, I can't quote it in his name since I didn't get his permission to use his name on this site, but I'll say that he's a well respected Musmach from Yeshivas Chafetz Chaim). He said that given the limited number of ...


6

בס"ד Ownership In regards to whether you have ownwership with a rental. The entirety of the hotel belongs to the owner of the hotel, including the rooms that we, the guests are renting from the owner, so when I carry around the hotel I am carrying within the property of that owner. The room I rent in the hotel is not my property unless it is a long ...


5

Rashi in Pesachim 56a writes that Sefer HaRefuos was hidden because their hearts were not humbled over their illness but were, rather, healed immediately. Rambam in Peirush Hamishna (Pesachim 4:10) rejects this approach arguing that just as one may not hold back food from the hungry, so too one may not withhold healing from the ill. Instead, Rambam writes ...


3

Although there is a prohibition to read books about idolatry or even say their names (Rambam Avodah Zara 2:3), R. Moshe Feinstein (Y.D. II 53) has stated that, like in other halakhos of Avodah Zara, we need not be concerned if that form of idol worship has been annulled (which in this context means that nobody worships it anymore). While there's no ...


3

As Rashi explains in ברכות on 10b and in פסחים on 56a: שגנז ספר רפואות לפי שלא היה לבם נכנע על חולים אלא מתרפאין מיד People would not take the illness as a stimulus to do Teshuva, rather they would immediately look up the cure - and lose the divinely-sent lesson of the illness.


3

Assuming that you know 100% a non-Jew will be on duty, and assuming that scanning books is forbidden on Shabbat. I think it would depend: If you have to have the book returned by Shabbat - or else incur a fine - then you are essentially asking the non-Jew to process your book now. Asking, hinting or otherwise getting a non-Jew to do work for you on ...


3

This would not be prohibited through the laws of the land, since the First Sale Doctrine (17 United States code section 109(a))exhausts copyright lending laws at the point of sale. Normal copyright laws in halacha cover the profits from something, not the use of the object itself (Chasam Sofer Choshen Mishpat 49). Therefore, if you aren't profiting, it ...


3

Rabbi Abraham Twerski has written many books that might be of the type that you need. Check out the list of books and videos at his web site to see if they are what you need. GuardUrEyes A website for Jews struggling to maintain their moral purity in today's world


3

Libraries vary significantly from shul to shul based on the congregation but there are some standards that are common across the board and which would be missed if anyone tried to use the shul library for studying. Siddurim. These aren't really part of the library, but a basic necessity because most of your congregation will want something to pray out of. ...


2

Try bookfinder.com I've used them for years (mostly for English titles, but some Hebrew seforim). Got vol 2 of Alei Shur for 15 bucks with free shipping from England to Chicago.


2

Another good reference, although scarce today, would be Abraham Baer's בעל תפלה oder Der Praktische Vorbeter.


2

The text is called Sfat Emet Siftei Kohen (שפת אמת שפתי כהן), and it was authored by R' Bentzion HaKohen. You can find copies for purchase here and here, although I regret that it's nearly impossible to find anything about it. It has nothing to do with the Gerrer Rebbe, and the pronunciation for which it serves as a guide has nothing to do with Gerrer ...


2

I do not have a Jewish self-help recommendation for you at the moment, but I can share a source for a Jewish perspective on Christianity to "inoculate" yourself before venturing to read "Everybody's Normal Till You Get to Know Them". Chapters 71 and 72 of "Jewish Literacy" by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin gives an Orthodox Jewish response to some of the more ...


2

A couple of options that have worked for me in the past: Ebay is your friend. I'm currently seeing a few dozen single volumes for sale there, although obviously the selection will fluctuate. I've had good luck getting single volumes at used book sales and used book stores. Stores that focus exclusively on new books won't be much help here. What metro area ...


2

As sam said in the comments "If it takes away someone's mind from aveilus then it should not be done,just like working on Tisha bav even after chatzos see Shulchan Aruch 554:22 with the Mishna Brurah there" So since it most probably would take your mind off aveilus the answer is you are not allowed to.


2

Try CheapJewishBooks.com. All the profits go to buying Sefarim for people who cannot afford them.


1

Online you can contact http://www.jewishusedbooks.com/ which sells individual volumes. In Lakewood there is a Sefarim store in the basement of the Capital Hotel that sells used Sefarim and sells many individual volumes.


1

If you live in NYC, Beigeleisen (sp?) on 16th avenue in Brooklyn, and the other store two doors down from them (forget the name) both sell used sefarim out-of-set.


1

It's all hotel property (or it may even belong to some religious group, not the hotel), not yours. So it's not your problem. The best thing to do is just ignore it. Here's a quick test: if you were out at a conference and lightning struck the hotel room and burned it down, would the hotel expect you to pay for a new bible? Of course not! (If you damaged ...


1

Asimov's Guide to the Bible by Isaac Asimov takes an academic view but includes information about both miraculous and mundane archaeology. He does invoke rabbinical sources and I was surprised that certain things are actually supported. Og's bed, for example, is indeed visible to this day.


1

The Riddle of the Exodus by James Long adheres fairly well to Orthodox religious beliefs (it was recommended to me by an Orthodox Rabbi), and discusses much of the relevant archaeology. The book's focus is, like the title, on the Exodus: showing that the decline of the great empire of Egypt corresponds with the time of the Biblical story of its destruction ...


1

Derech Emuna from the Tzemach Tzedek is that type of Sefer.


1

Any academic or secular book (not written for a religious Jewish audience) will discuss Jewish philosophy from the perspective of the discipline of philosophy as a whole. You can start with this article on Jewish philosophy from the Jewish Virtual Library, which is pretty good, and go on to read books on specific areas of interest. For example, if you're ...


1

You can try looking into the Kuzari, it might be what you're looking for (the Kuzari and Rambam's Guide for the Perplexed are often compared as two of the classic texts on Jewish philosophy). I would recommend the Feldheim edition by Rabbi N. Daniel Korobkin.


1

While I'm afraid I will be unable to provide a definitive source I believe that my hypothesis to answer the question @DoubleAA referenced in his comment is all but certainly applicable here: I am not certain but I suspect that it is simply a decorative practice. I believe I have seen it done on older, non-Jewish books and I assume that the practice ...


1

there is a sefer sfas emes on the topic but not written by the sfas emes rather contemporary author 5747. maybe you misunderstood 'sfas emes'


1

Birkhot Shamayim by Rabbi Yosef Dweck provides an index of what Berachot to make on which foods, and the Sephardi laws of Berakhot.


1

Here are the three volumes of Salomon Munk's edition of the Judeo-Arabic original of the Guide of the Perplexed (together with Munk's French translation), available free in full text on Google Books (the Arabic starts from the end of each volume): Guide of the Perplexed: Munk ed. 1st vol. Guide of the Perplexed: Munk ed. 2nd vol. Guide of the Perplexed: ...


1

Rashbam R. Samuel ben Meir (Rashbam) was Rashi's grandson (his father, Meir, was Rashi's son in-law) and the older brother of Rabbenu Tam. He was born ca. 1080 and died ca. 1160. He spent his whole life in France, and studied Torah with his father and other scholars, especially his grandfather Rashi, in whose house in Troyes he grew up. He studied Torah ...


1

http://www.kodeshbook.co.il has very large variety of seforim, only new, for great price. What I like is that they can get you all Artscroll books in Israel for the Artscroll site prices but without the extra sales tax that is added on for purchases in Israel. Service is great considering that it is an Israeli based company, and they really do try to make ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible