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39

Before a name: הבחור החשוב - הבה"ח Habachur hashuv; "The important young man" המלומד בניסים = המלוב"ן Hamulumad benisim; (one) who has practiced many miracles - used for sfaradic Rabis who deal with "Torat Hanistar" רב/רבי = ר׳; rav/rabi; "rabbi...". OR רבינו; rabeinu; "our rabbi" הרב = הר׳; harav; "the rabbi". הרב רבי/רבינו = הר״ר; harav rabi/rabeinu; ...


17

Then, too, we have to deal with some of the derogatory ones. A couple to start with: י"ש or ימ"ש = yimach shemo יש"ו = yimach shemam vizichram or yimach shimo vizichro (Great acronym by the way!) שר"י = shem resha'im yirkav


16

It's called Stam, and was designed by Francesca Baruch in the 1930s (originally for the logo of the newspaper Haaretz - this logo is still in use). Not to be confused with more recent fonts also bearing the name Stam, which are made to look like Ashkenazic or Sephardic Torah lettering, complete with crowns on the letters. I see where Davka has repackaged ...


16

The oldest written Torah Sheb'al Peh (though not exactly a manuscript) would seem to be the recently-discovered mosaic of the ancient shul in Beit Shaan. The Hebrew Wikipedia article about that shul (which was destroyed 1300 years ago, and existed a few hundred before that) can be found at this link. Here is their image of the mosaic (I hope I'm allowed to ...


16

The Bar-Ilan Responsa project has an online version that allows free searches, displaying up to 150 words from each result. This is an extremely powerful program, as its textbase is "clean" and edited, as opposed to many other search programs (such as Hebrewbooks and Otzar HaChochma) which are mostly based on error-prone, OCR-derived text.


15

While Sefer Yetzirah does give a basic outline in creating a Golem(though arguably that is not the primary purpose of those parts), it does not give a specific formula. Much of that is relegated to the commentaries, and even there the procedure is patchy at best. The most detailed instructions can be found in the commentaries of Avraham Abulafia and an ...


13

In Orach Chayim, it refers to a comment by the Yad Efrayim, in the margin. The Business Halacha Institute tells me that in Choshen Mishpat it points to a chidush [a novel thought or opinion].


13

The Commentary on the Mishnah came first. In his colophon at the end of it, Rambam writes that he began writing the commentary at age 23, and finished it at age 30, in the year 1479 of the "Era of Documents" (4928 since Creation, 1168 CE). The Mishneh Torah, on the other hand, was written in the 4930s. In the introduction he says that the current year is ...


12

I believe it's been out of copyright for a while. You can access the whole book online here: http://www.tyndalearchive.com/TABS/Jastrow/ It's also available on Google Books, though I only found Vol. 2 there. Vol 1 and Vol 2 are available on Hebrewbooks.org.


12

From "FREE PRIMARY JEWISH SOURCES AND RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET" It's divided by chelek (click download on the top-right): http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14170&pgnum=1 http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14164&pgnum=1 http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14171&pgnum=1 ...


12

I don't know if this qualifies as a truly "classic" source, but there is a classic essay by R' Zevin about "The Judgment of Shylock According to Halachah." Update: It seems that Hebrewbooks has removed this sefer (לאור ההלכה) from their collection. I could not locate the article anywhere else online, except for a snippet view in Google Books here. Also of ...


11

I always assumed the motivation was to provide information from a diversity of posekim, when they differ on something, so that readers will be aware that there are varying opinions/traditions. An extreme version of this is an edition of Kitzur Shulchan Aruch compiled by R' Mordechai Eliyahu that includes glosses with the opinions of the Mishna Berura and ...


10

Okay, I'll address part of part ("Does it have value to the modern... math-learning audience?") of question 6, and part of question 5, for now. I've read chapter 1 only (and the main text only, not the marginal notes) so far, and it has definitions, postulates, and theorems from elementary plane geometry, lumping postulates and theorems together (i.e., not ...


9

Let's assume MLA style. eHow has this: Lastly, if your source is a sacred text, such as the Bible or Talmud, cite the edition, book, chapter, and verse. This may vary according to each text. ([Edition], [Book]. [Chapter].[Verse]) So treat Talmud like Bible. Purdue University's writing lab has this: Citing the Bible In your first ...


9

The Midrash (Exodus Rabbah 47:1) says that one reason was to maintain one portion of the Torah as a uniquely Jewish possession. The gentiles have the written Torah (ever since, under order of Ptolemy II Philadelphus, it was translated into Greek, and later into other languages); but so long as the Oral Torah remained orally transmitted, it was unavailable to ...


9

According to Wikipedia, Jubilees was written in the later Second Temple era, well past the cut-off date for canonization in the Tanach. It was adopted by the Hasmonians (Chashmonaim), but despite the general Rabbinic dislike of the Hasmonians, it is not mentioned at all by "Pharisaic or Rabbinic sources," eg. the Mishna. Since the book was not canonized in ...


8

In the Frankel ed. it is called Hagahos Maimoniyos.


8

There is an excellent website for such calculations here. It is customizable based on the sefer and review schedule of your preference. It is a little complicated, but provides example entries to help you figure out how to use it. Also, there are links on the side of that webpage leading to versions of the calculator specific to daf yomi/ amud yomi/ tanach/ ...


8

In those cases, the copyright would apply to the refinements made to the text as a result of the publisher's research. For example, if you want to publish a sefer you cannot just grab the text from the Bar Ilan disk, since they put much effort into correcting the mistakes and expanding the abbreviations, etc. If, however, a publisher is just copying an old ...


8

The only question that I'm going to answer directly is number 2, since I heard directly from my Rebbi that it is 100% permissible (unfortunately, I can't quote it in his name since I didn't get his permission to use his name on this site, but I'll say that he's a well respected Musmach from Yeshivas Chafetz Chaim). He said that given the limited number of ...


7

According to the Wikipedia entry on Rashi, The first dated Hebrew printed book was Rashi's commentary on the Chumash, printed by Abraham ben Garton in Reggio di Calabria, Italy, 18 February 1475. (This version did not include the text of the Chumash itself.) Some good images of that sefer can be found here. And yes, they are in "Rashi script"!


7

A reasonable compromise I've sometimes seen is to enclose the original abbreviation in parentheses, and follow it by the updated one in square brackets, like so: ...הרב פלוני (שליט"א) [זצ"ל] אמר


7

Look for anything by Velvel Pasternak. For example, The Jewish Fake Book or The Ultimate Jewish Piano Book (both on JewishMusic.com). There are also more specialized collections, such as Sefer Hanigunim (2 vols.), a collection of Chabad niggunim.


7

Well wikisource has the full text of what I can tell is the entire thing, over here. (you can see all 4 seforim over here). You can also find it on HebrewBooks.org (pdf's are searchable, but not so good because of OCR) here and here.


7

Abarbanel discusses why all nevuos, including those of Yeshayahu, Yirmiyahu, etc., are not written in their historical context in Melachim or elsewhere. For that matter, why a separate book for Tehillim and Mishlei? Why not just include them with the stories of David and Shlomo? I will not post his entire discussion here, but the gist of it is twofold: It ...


7

From the Feldheim website: Of the many works of Rabbi Moshe Hayyim Luzzatto, Mesillat Yesharim stands out as his magnum opus. Ever since it was first published in 1740 in Amsterdam, it has enjoyed great renown and was eventually adopted as a basic text for ethical study. Throughout the long history of its publication, Mesillat Yesharim fell prey to many ...


7

The Talmud discusses Genizoth. I don't recall off-hand the context, but I remember learning a Gemara that said students of great sages in the Tannaic era, when writing Torah SheBe'Al Peh was prohibited, would take notes that they would later commit to memory before placing in Genizah. In addition (or in contrast, perhaps), if a scribe made an uncorrectable ...


6

There's an undated edition of Rashi (also without the Chumash text) that is generally assumed to be from about 1470 - a few years earlier than Garton's edition referenced in Dave's response. A facsimile is at Hebrewbooks - and it's in square (not "Rashi") type.


6

It would seem from this link that it is Hagahos Maimoniyos. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=26453&pgnum=49


6

It looks like the mitzva of honesty in weights and measures: שלא להונות במדות. The highest quality hebrewbooks version has little whitespaces where the pictures you seek should be. In the lower quality version you can clearly see where the copier just left the pictures out. And finally, a much clearer [type] version of the same text with absolutely no ...



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