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11

The Maharal (Chapter 56 of Gevuros Hashem)points out that the plagues follow a pattern, split into units of 3 - the first of each group (plagues 1, 4, and 7) are preceded by a warning to Pharaoh issued by the Nile. The second of each group (2, 5, and 8) are preceded by a warning issued to Pharaoh while sitting on his throne. The third of each group has no ...


8

Because the Egyptians were looking for any excuse to say that the plagues were not of divine origin. If they were not of divine origin then the Egyptians wouldn't feel the need to let the Jews go. If they saw any reason, no matter how slight, to say that they were not from G-d, they would jump on that opportunity. Moshe did not want to give them that ...


7

Due to Egyptian immorality, there were actually a lot of firstborns. All of these were counted: Firstborn of the mother Firstborn of the father Male Female Oldest in the house, even if not a firstborn All Egyptian firstborns, even in other countries Firstborns of other nationalities currently in Egypt Rashi to Ex. 12:30, s.v. כי אין בית אשר אין שם מת and ...


7

Rabbi Hirsch points out several patterns, but recall that God had told Abraham: "Your offspring will be a foreigner in a land not theirs, they will be enslaved, and tormented. The Jews experienced three types of Egyptian behavior: "you don't belong here", "you are less than us", and inflicting pain. Each trio of plagues therefore followed the same pattern ...


7

The explanation that I once heard for this was that the makkos were intended to teach a lesson to Pharaoh, and a very specific lesson. Pharaoh believed in gods with powers. Seeing something paranormal wasn't the end of the discussion for Pharaoh. What fascinated Pharaoh was absolute power - Pharaoh believed in a pantheon of gods, and one G-d with absolute ...


4

The next Rashi gives two answers to this question: שהיו שמחין לאידם של ישראל ועוד שלא יאמרו יראתנו הביאה הפורענו' זו They were happy with the enslavement of Israel, and also so that they wouldn't be able to say that their god brought these disasters upon Egypt.


4

Rashi on Chumash channels midrashic works, selecting those midrashim that fit his stated criteria and reworking them to form a commentary. Rashi has favored midrashim on different chumashim. On sefer Shemot, he channels the Mechilta, which is a midrash composed on Shemot. Indeed, follow your link to Shemot 12 and see how many of his sources are from the ...


3

They were a mixture from other nations that decided to join the Jews at the exodus (Oknkelos, Rashi and pretty much everyone I could find, although some identify them specifically as Egyptians). Rabbi Gansfried quotes various opinions as to their size, based on the idea that the 600,000 number represents one fifth of the total that left. Whether that ...


3

I think that the issue here is less to do with the word itself, which is used some eight times altogether in Tanakh, than it is with the fact that it denotes an action being done to Bilaam. God is mit'alel the Egyptians, the men of Gibeah are mit'alel the concubine, Saul is concerned lest the Philistines might mit'alel him (1 Chr 10:4), but Bilaam declares ...


1

See Rashi's explanation in Shemot 10:14 regarding the phrase "... there was never Arbeh like it and afterwards there will not be...". Rashi explains that there are different species of locusts one of which is called arbeh. He explains that this plague of locusts in Egypt was only of that species called arbeh. So, I'm assuming that the use of the definite ...


1

The mipharshei Rashi on 11:5 try explaining why Rashi chose to explain the reason for the death of the firstborns of the captives as being so they should not think it was their gods punishing the Egyptians, even though they are not mentioned in that passuk. See the Sifsei Chachamim, his words are basically from the Mizrachi and Gur Aryeh. From what they ...


1

This was in order for Hashem to fulfill his promise to Avraham found in parshas Lech Licha chapter 15 verse 14. וגם את הגוי אשר יעבדו דן אנכי ואחרי כן יצאו ברכש גדול.


1

Rav Hirsch in chapter 7 at the end of vs 15 writes 'As we observed above, the first two plagues of each group were rather more to teach a lesson, as only the third was really a punishment, above that was why the two first ones only came after having been announced beforehand.'


1

Because Goshen wasn't a such good land. The Mitzrim hated to breed sheep (for religious belief I think). Explicitly Yosef asked his father to speak about his occupation in front of paro, in order to get the land of Goshen, a retired land with grass, in which the Hebrews would be more quiet/exposed to Egyptian society. edit: yes, source.. chapter 47 first ...



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