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12

Chelev (the word translated as "fat" in the quoted verse) in Halacha refers to certain fats which in a sacrifice are offered on the altar and in regular meat are forbidden to be eaten, while Shuman refers to other fats which are completely permitted. A list of which fats on which body parts are in which category is something which pretty much can only be ...


12

Human blood is not included in the prohibition (Shulchan Arukh YD 66:10). There is a concern when consuming any permitted blood that no one think you are consuming forbidden blood. A classic solution to this is including fish scales in a cup of fish blood (ibid. :9). It seems to me that a transfusion bag serves this purpose sufficiently. Even were one to ...


10

Ibn Ezra said that only the above ground water (such as in the river) turned to blood, but water that was underground before the plague stayed water. "And all of Egypt dug around the river to find water to drink" (7:24) Thus , when the Egyptian magicians needed water to emulate the plague, they dug a new well The medrash Rabbah states that the ...


9

First of all, the whole point of the 'river turning to blood' was that it was supposed to be a miracle, an event showing that superiority of a force over the natural world (i.e. science). So, if anything, your example proves that the Jews DO believe in modern science, as they believe that there's no natural way to turn water into blood without divine ...


8

The Shevet Halevi, Vol. 10:133, was asked this question and he says that if one buys eggs which turn out to have blood spots it should be considered a מקח טעות (a mistaken purchase), but the custom is not to consider it a מקח טעות because it is impossible to determine the nature of the eggs before they are sold. And if one borrowed eggs and some of them had ...


7

Technically, "modern science" incorporates quantum mechanics, which includes the ideas of particles "blipping" in and out of existence, as well as that of all that science predicts are probabilities not definitive absolutes. So modern science doesn't really contradict the miraculous (which are essentially then statistical anomalies). Furthermore, at a ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


7

The Shir Maon writes they turned blood into "water" (looked like it) and then turned it back into its original state which is blood.Magic cannot work on water(see Sanhedrin) but blood could.


5

There is a Bach that discusses fresh wet bedikos vs dry ones . Noone seems to care about his concern and the apprenticeship is on dry bedikos so people are trained to recognize their halachic status in that state. At some point though the color does change and competent Rabbis will no longer pasken on them. But interestingly enough the nida blood does not ...


5

Slide 28 of this presentation quotes Rabbi Avraham Fischer of the OU: Chelev refers to the outer layer of fat called suet. The prohibited chelev is the abdominal fat on the stomach, kidney, and flank. It can be peeled away like a skin. The rest of the fat which is permissible is called shuman. Chelev or Suet is used in occasional cooking (non ...


4

R' Samson Raphael Hirsh's Commentary on some of the verses you cite provides extensive treatments of particular lessons to be derived from each kind of blood-sprinking or -pouring, starting with seven pages on the one introduced in Vayikra 1:5. My understanding, after looking through some of these for general ideas about the meaning of blood-sprinkling, is ...


3

As observed in the comments -- egg farmers "candle" an egg by shining a bright light through it to check for blood spots. This works better with white eggs, which are more translucent than brown ones. So if you buy a dozen white eggs at the store, it's more likely they caught the blood spots at the factory and they didn't make it to the shelf. In short -- ...


1

The OU has an article addressing spots found in eggs. Of note, it says: Today, however, the only concerns are maris ayin or dam beitzim (a small amount of blood from a broken blood vessel in the hen, which is not forbidden). As a result, the entire egg is never assur and mei’ikar hadin removal of the blood spot would suffice ... Rav Moshe, however, ...


1

Here it says About 25-30% of brown eggs, irrespective of brand, typically have what are referred to as pigment or protein spots next to the yolk or floating in the albumen. If you look very closely at white eggs, you will see that they have similar particles of protein floating around, but the hens lack the brown pigment in their system that combines ...


1

The selling thing is a nice midrash. And indeed those are valid questions if we go with the approach of the midrash. One alternative, however, would be a different reading of how the plague worked. This escapes your questions, and it follows the simplest reading of the actual verses. Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's translation: 7:19 God said to Moses, 'Tell ...



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