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9

It is logical to think that the priests were careful, so that the blood only landed on the floor, and not on the actual curtains. Regarding Beit HaMikdash, the whole place was covered with aqueducts and water channels from the surrounding rivers/lakes. These would lead the blood (and other remains) outside. For example, the Mishna in Yoma 5, 6 talks about ...


7

To supplement, not supplant, Cauthon's good answer, I'll note that the mishna (Midos chapter 3) says that the altar and its ramp would be cleaned every Friday with a cloth, because of the blood. (This is Rabi's statement, but the commentaries note that he's explaining and not arguing on the other rabbi in the mishna.) (It's not completely clear to me ...


4

In addition to the other answers, we have some evidence that blood did land on the veil in the Holy of Holies when the Kohein Gadol (High Priest) sprinkled it there on Yom Kippur, and that they weren't too good about cleaning it. The gemara in Meilah 17b quotes the sage R' Elazar Bar R' Yose as having seen the curtain in the treasury in Rome, and it had ...


2

I've never, ever heard of such a thing (yuck!) and it wouldn't surprise me if the sources are distorted. But nonetheless, let's look at this from a halachic angle. Kesubos 60a: הוא טמא ואין דם מהלכי שתים טמא אלא טהור ואמר רב ששת אפילו מצות פרישה אין בו לא קשיא הא דפריש הא דלא פריש וחלופא בדם כדתניא דם שעל גבי ככר גוררו ואוכלו שבין השינים מוצצו ואינו ...


1

The Gemara says that they gave Malkus to someone who was able to avoid tearing the Besulim, since it showed that he had much experience. There was a special blessing that was said upon seeing the blood. This suggests that there is something special about seeing the open witness to the purity. Chazal allowed Be'ilas Mitzva on Shabbos because it is ...



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