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12

Human blood is not included in the prohibition (Shulchan Arukh YD 66:10). There is a concern when consuming any permitted blood that no one think you are consuming forbidden blood. A classic solution to this is including fish scales in a cup of fish blood (ibid. :9). It seems to me that a transfusion bag serves this purpose sufficiently. Even were one to ...


12

Chelev (the word translated as "fat" in the quoted verse) in Halacha refers to certain fats which in a sacrifice are offered on the altar and in regular meat are forbidden to be eaten, while Shuman refers to other fats which are completely permitted. A list of which fats on which body parts are in which category is something which pretty much can only be ...


10

Ibn Ezra said that only the above ground water (such as in the river) turned to blood, but water that was underground before the plague stayed water. "And all of Egypt dug around the river to find water to drink" (7:24) Thus , when the Egyptian magicians needed water to emulate the plague, they dug a new well The medrash Rabbah states that the ...


9

First of all, the whole point of the 'river turning to blood' was that it was supposed to be a miracle, an event showing that superiority of a force over the natural world (i.e. science). So, if anything, your example proves that the Jews DO believe in modern science, as they believe that there's no natural way to turn water into blood without divine ...


8

The Shevet Halevi, Vol. 10:133, was asked this question and he says that if one buys eggs which turn out to have blood spots it should be considered a מקח טעות (a mistaken purchase), but the custom is not to consider it a מקח טעות because it is impossible to determine the nature of the eggs before they are sold. And if one borrowed eggs and some of them had ...


8

I am going to deal with the bleeding first. Shulhan Arukh O"H 320:20 There is an opinion who holds that when eating berries and other dyeing fruits one must take care not to touch one’s clothes or a cloth with fruit-colored hands, but if one colors bread with the coloring liquid it is not a problem because there is no prohibition to color ...


7

Actually, according to Yoreh De'ah 66:10, your own Human blood is only Assur because of Maris Ayin (similar to fish blood). Therefore: If it's still in your own mouth, and it doesn't leave, you may swallow it. If it leaves your mouth, you may not swallow it Also, if it gets on food (e.g. you're biting into a sandwich), you may not eat it (i.e. the blood on ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


7

The Shir Maon writes they turned blood into "water" (looked like it) and then turned it back into its original state which is blood.Magic cannot work on water(see Sanhedrin) but blood could.


7

Technically, "modern science" incorporates quantum mechanics, which includes the ideas of particles "blipping" in and out of existence, as well as that of all that science predicts are probabilities not definitive absolutes. So modern science doesn't really contradict the miraculous (which are essentially then statistical anomalies). Furthermore, at a ...


6

This is a misinterpretation of the verse in Deuteronomy 22 (17). See Rashi's famous commentary on the verse, citing ancient sources: The Biblical text: And behold, he made libellous charges, saying, 'I did not find evidence of your daughter's virginity.' But this is the evidence of my daughter's virginity!' And they shall spread the garment before ...


6

The meaning of this sugya is actually disputed by Rashi and Tosafos. Rashi (ד"ה חלייה) offers two definitions of this term: the juice that comes out of the meat when it's cut, or vinegar that it's soaked in after roasting it, to remove the blood. And indeed he holds that even when the vinegar becomes forbidden due to the blood, the meat can remain kosher. ...


6

See here: http://mi.yodeya.com/questions/1188/kashering-a-knife "The consumption of human presents a number of halachic problems/prohibitions but they are not related to kashrus strictly speaking. Human blood is prohibited because of Maris Ayin, it is not even strictly speaking a "Rabbinic prohibition". As such there is, I believe, no concept of tam k'ikkar ...


5

Although I don't have a source, I would say that they didn't have the power to do that. Their point was still accomplished, though, because they proved that they could do the same as Moshe...


5

Slide 28 of this presentation quotes Rabbi Avraham Fischer of the OU: Chelev refers to the outer layer of fat called suet. The prohibited chelev is the abdominal fat on the stomach, kidney, and flank. It can be peeled away like a skin. The rest of the fat which is permissible is called shuman. Chelev or Suet is used in occasional cooking (non ...


4

R' Samson Raphael Hirsh's Commentary on some of the verses you cite provides extensive treatments of particular lessons to be derived from each kind of blood-sprinking or -pouring, starting with seven pages on the one introduced in Vayikra 1:5. My understanding, after looking through some of these for general ideas about the meaning of blood-sprinkling, is ...


4

See the Chelkat Mechokek to the Shulchan Aruch there who rules that the only reason it isn't recited Over Laasiyatan (before the action, as is generally required with mitzva brachot) is because there is no way to know before hand if the woman is actually a Betulah. There is a general argument if the requirement of Over Laasiyatan in general is absolute, or ...


4

In answer to your question, according to this article from OU, no: There is no problem with eating eggs cooked in the shell (boiled or roasted), even though these cannot be checked. However, note that this would only apply to non-fertilized eggs (as are commonly available today). If you're dealing with fertile eggs (usually available at a premium), ...


4

You're conflating more than one prohibition. There is one set of prohibitions on consuming the blood of land animals and birds (eg: Leviticus 7:26-27, 17:10-12; Deuteronomy 12:23). This is never permissible, whether or not the animal has died first. There is a separate prohibition of consuming pieces of land animals or birds that were removed from them ...


4

The unsalted meat should not come in contact with any kosher food or vessels until the process of salting is completed. Step one: Take the meat and wash it well then soak it in a special vessel (used specifically for this) for a half hour (Rama 69:1). When finished soaking let the water drip off before salting. If using a knife to cut open clots or to just ...


4

Imagine there was a magician claiming to have a super-natural ability to turn water into blood, and you want to discredit him and prove that it's just a trick. You would need to perform the exact illusion that the magician was performing, turn water into blood. Doing the reverse would not discredit the initial "miracle" that the magician performed. ...


4

Rav Hirsch suggests an alternate explanation of the magicians’ behavior according to your suggestion: that they were attempting to undo the effects of the plague with no success—or in the case of the frogs, more frogs came when they attempted to banish them. After their third failure, they acknowledged that it was “God’s Finger” at work.


4

There is a Bach that discusses fresh wet bedikos vs dry ones . Noone seems to care about his concern and the apprenticeship is on dry bedikos so people are trained to recognize their halachic status in that state. At some point though the color does change and competent Rabbis will no longer pasken on them. But interestingly enough the nida blood does not ...


3

The consumption of human presents a number of halachic problems/prohibitions but they are not related to kashrus strictly speaking. Human blood is prohibited because of Maris Ayin, it is not even strictly speaking a "Rabbinic prohibition". As such there is, I believe, no concept of tam k'ikkar (the taste is like the forbidden substance). As such while it ...


3

No. (I need to provide sources, I know.) There's talk about whether a slaugher knife remains fully kosher, but that discussion is always about whether the blood heat of the animal (did you know that the duck as the highest internal temperature of kosher animals in the literature?) "cooks" the blood into the knife. Human blood heat is certainly less than ...


2

This article briefly touches on this subject; the only real substantial additional source she sites is the Seforno to Vayikra 17:4 (though she probably means 17:7, who was prceeded by Rabbeinu Bachya [ben asher] on Dvarim 12:23). Unsourced are claims by Rabbi Menachem Zioni that vampires were associated with migdal bavel and a broad proclamation that ...


2

Read here for an evolution of the different opinions in Halacha regarding blood that moved, and eating raw meat (from the Talmud to the Poskim). "blood that moved" is talking about the blood that is found in the meat, not the veins/arteries (as the Tur (67) and others say, while raw meat may be permitted without salting, the blood found in the ...


2

You don't have to. In fact, it is impossible to do so since after cooking, the blood can get mixed up and not be noticeable. Since it is impossible to check, we rely on the rov (majority) or eggs that are not bloody. Source: here


2

I think the simple Pshat is that the blood on the door post was for the Jewish people. It was for them to realize that it is because of adherence to this Mitzvah of Korbon Pesach that they are being spared. The main thrust of the Korbon Pesach (see Ramban, Rambam) is a repudiation of Idolatry. These animals were worshiped as God's by the Egyptians. We ...


2

@Avrohom Yitzchok's answer gets to part of the misunderstanding here, but there is more to unpack. 1) A lady upon first marriage is expected to be a virgin. So is the man. It isn't a particular virtue, it is just about where you naturally are if you are behaving correctly before marriage. In fact Rav Nachman in the Talmud says that if a previously ...



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