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9

Possibly this is a (mistaken) extension of the idea that once summoned for birkath kohanim in the synagogue service, a Kohen who declines to perform the blessing is in violation of the positive commandment to bless the people: Shulchan Aruch 128:2 Any Kohain to whom one of the inhibiting factors does not apply who does not go up to the duchan, even ...


5

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 551:17 says: טוב ליזהר מלומר שהחיינו בין המצרים על פרי או על מלבוש אבל על פדיון הבן אומר ולא יחמיץ המצוה It is good to avoid saying Shehechianu in the three weeks on a fruit or clothing, but on a Pidyon HaBen he says it and doesn't postpone the Mitzvah. The Magein Avraham (s.v. ולא יחמץ המצוה) quotes the Maharil as saying ...


5

The Hamodia newspaper had an article related to the Gemoro Nedorim 32. Pri Megadim records two opinions concerning the proper time to recite “l’chaim.” According to one opinion, one should make the brachah, drink some wine and then say “l’chaim,” whereas other opinions maintain that one should recite “l’chaim” before even reciting the brachah ...


5

Say the B'racha without a head covering. The Gra disagreed with R. Yosef Karo’s ruling (that it is forbidden to walk with an upright posture and cannot walk 4 amoth without a head covering) and countered that one is never obligated to wear a head covering, even while participating in a religious event. His opinion was based in part on a Tosefta ...


4

Rabbi Chayim Cohen addresses this question in his Dose of Halacha: He quotes Rabbi Heinemann who holds that the bracha is subjective - that is it does depend on what you consider to be the primary food, just as you suggest. .. R’ Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe OC3:31) addresses the issue of chocolate-covered raisins, though is clear that one recites ...


3

Thanks to the Westmount Shul for this answer. Yes there is a difference, depending on how it grows. This is the way both Rabbi Bodner's & Rabbi Forst's Sefer rules also. Similarly, many "wild" plants, even though they produce fruit from year to year, are not considered trees. If only their roots remain and their trunk (or stem) dies out, they do ...


2

I am going to address what I assume to be the scenario that you are seeing. Often, a "L'chaim" is said in the middle of a meal. Now according to many opinions, liquor would need its own bracha even in the middle of a meal where one said hamotzi; however, it is likely that the person who is making the l'chaim had already had some to drink and had probably ...


2

When two foods with different brachot are mixed together sufficiently that any bite you take would certainly contain both items, only one bracha is said on the food. Furthermore, in almost all cases, mezonot items are considered the ikkar in a food mixture. The only time when this is not the case is when the mezonot is purely to hold the food together. In ...


2

Riv'vos Efrayim, volume 2, responsum 115, paragraph 57 (on page 200), in part, in my own, loose translation: It seems that if he did not recite "hagafen" in havdala he fulfills his obligation. However, if he remembers before the drinking of the wine, he must then recite "hagafen". My omitting "shehakol", the correct benediction, on my beer is akin, as ...


2

First, some background information: This question is explicit in the halakhah and only due to a personal minhagh of the Rosh brought down by the Tur (OH 166 - where he re-interprets the gemara to fit this personal custom of the Rosh - see Rabbenu Yoel there) has there been any confusion on the issue. Rambam, Rashi, and the Ba`alei Tosafoth all agree that ...


1

You need to make Shehakol because dough isn't intended for eating Source: Brachot 6:3


1

I learnt from Habad that one makes the bracha, sips the drink, says LeHayim and completes drinking. This would not work for Kiddush of course because of the need for a shiur (quantity) of wine.


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While the rabbinic understanding is sourced in Talmud Bavli Berachot 35b, it is based on the specific biblical (albeit, Ketuvim) application of 'to gladden/be happy' found in Psalms 104:15.


1

Qitzur Shulhhan 'Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim, Siman 206) outlines many parameters for a break or pause (hefseq) between one's berakhah on a food or drink and the tasting of that food or drink. Se'if 10 in particular touches on the utterance of even a single word not related to one's berakhah, another's berakhah or a Devar SheBiqedushah. As such, it ...


1

Many Sephardim include L'Chaim as part of kiddush: HOST: Savri meranan v'rbanan v'rabotai. CROWD: L'Chaim!! HOST: Baruch ata Hashem elokenu melech haolem borei pri hagefen. (Yes I know, Ashkenazim say hagafen.) So I'd follow that precedent. A hearty "L'Chaim" all around, followed by the bracha. I suppose you could also make the bracha, take ...


1

My Rav's opinion: Chocolate-covered coffee beans places it in the same classification as candy or a plain piece of chocolate, even if the coffee bean is the majority ingredient by volume. Thus, he considers the ikar to be the chocolate, as that is the reason people eat these items. Few people would eat just the plain coffee beans without the chocolate ...



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