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7

There's no such thing as "counting with a bracha" and "counting without a bracha". The Mitzva is to count. Blessings on (just about) all Mitzvot are separate rabbinic obligations. Whether or not a blessing is said on a Mitzva is a separate question from if there is a Mitzva (some Mitzvot never have blessings!). A Mitzva done without its requisite blessing (...


5

There are a number of things wrong with this. First, the traditional practice is to have the same person recite all the blessings. Even if there was some sort of pressing circumstance here, it's hard to see why the couple themselves would need to do this to avoid family fighting or whatever. Second, R Avraham ben HaRambam writes that a groom should not ...


5

The short answer is yes. The reason is that there is a machlokes as to whether it is a mitzvah to count each day or if the mitzvah is one "long" mitzvah to count all seven weeks or both. Thus, we count without a bracha to take all the opinions into account. Rabbi Chaim Jachter discusses the latest time that one can count the omer and explains why we would ...


3

Response to the POTENTIAL ISSUES INVOLVED: 1) Amount of food (and time) on which one makes an after-brocho. See here. One is only obligated to make a Bracha Achrona on a food if one eats a Kezayit of food in Kedi Achilat Pras. See the article for definition of the terms but in short Kezayit = 27 to 33 ccs. Kedi Achilat Pras = up to 7.5 minutes. 2) ...


2

The Gemoro in Brochos 35a says: "אמר רב יהודה אמר שמואל כל הנהנה מן העוה"ז בלא ברכה כאילו נהנה מקדשי שמים שנא' 'לה' הארץ ומלואה'. ר' לוי רמי: כתיב, 'לה' הארץ ומלואה', וכתיב 'השמים שמים לה' והארץ נתן לבני אדם'? לא קשיא; כאן קודם ברכה, כאן לאחר ברכה". Rav Yehuda says in the name of Shmuel, “anyone who benefits from this world without first making a ...


2

Rashi to that passuk (first p'shat) says it means that Avraham and his children should have the power to give brachos; up until this point, Hashem gave the brachos, not people.


2

Maharsha (Brachot 57b), quoted by R Akiva Eiger OC 224, gives the following text for destroying Avoda Zara in Israel: ברוך אתה ה אלוהינו מלך העולם אשר קידשנו במצוותיו וצוונו לעקור [ע"ז] מארצינו (RAE doesn't explicitly limit this to Israel, and it's not clear to me if he thought this was obvious because the Mitzva isn't as strong in the Diaspora or if ...


2

There is no minimum amount below which it is not considered "going to the bathroom" for the sake of making a blessing. The Shulchan Arukh addresses this question explicitly: אֵין שִׁעוּר לְהַשְׁתִּין מַיִם כִּי אֲפִלּוּ לְטִפָּה אַחַת חַיָּב לְבָרֵךְ, שֶׁאִם יִסָתֵם הַנֶּקֶב מִלְּהוֹצִיא הַטִּפָּה הַהִיא הָיָה קָשֶׁה לוֹ וְחַיָּב לְהוֹדוֹת:‏ ...


1

Bracha is from the word Breicha or reservoir. With each benefit we get from Hashem we need to look up and acknowledge the source. By doing this we never end up going very long throughout the day without connecting to that source since we are constantly on the receiving end of some divine benefit. Our day becomes filled with tefila and thanks and ...


1

From the Kabale point of view, Elokeinu refers to Gvurah, which is usually translated into rigor and justice. This world is under Gvurah attribute (Yalkut shim'oni). Malkhut isn't Gvurah : Malkhut is reign. In fact, it is the attribute that is above and below in Sder Hischtalchelous. Which means Malkhut transfers all 9 attributes above her to the world ...


1

Disclaimer: I was mechadeish this p'shat based on the sources mentioned below. If you can find this p'shat somewhere, that would be amazing, but I have not seen this explanation anywhere. If you don't like it, feel free to disagree. The Ramban (to Devarim 4:2) says, and I'm paraphrasing here, that the issue of Bal Tosif is that you can't add a Mitzvah and ...


1

The first recorded suggestion appears in an early 14th century German manuscript of Sefer Hasidim. One manuscript includes the following: “On manna they would pronounce the benediction ‘[Blessed are You, O Lord, king of the universe] who gives bread from the heaven’” (MS Parma H 3280; Wistinetzki, 1891, para. 1640). The next scholar who addressed this ...



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