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8

Men and women are both obligated in the Mitzva of Shabbat candles and saying the blessing. Women have precedence to ensure the Mitzva is fulfilled because they are more often at home preparing the house on Friday afternoon. (Shulchan Aruch OC 263:2-5 and Mishne Torah, Hilchos shabas ch. 5)


6

A straightforward answer is provided by the Meiri (Beis HaB'chira, B'rachos 35a) and echoed by the Shita M'kubeztes (Brachos 35a), who write that the phrasing for each is based on verses pertaining to each (as mentioned in Michoel's answer and in Shalom's answer). Further, the Meiri indicates that borei p'ri ha'adama would also be suitable for bread, ...


6

The Shita Mekubetzes to Brochos 35a ask this, and explains that the choice of wording for the two blessings is in accordance with phrases found previously in Tanach - the blessing for bread is based on the verse (Tehillim 104:14) "להוציא לחם מן הארץ", whereas the blessing for vegetables comes from the verse (Devarim 26:2) "מראשית כל פרי האדמה".


5

If you look into the morning brachos (prayes) it first says: 1) Thanks for not making me gentile. 2) Thanks for not making servant. 3) Thanks for not making me woman (for men). So it is progressive statement of what the person is not. That is because a Jewish man has much more obligations towards God than a Jewish woman. Both have much more obligations ...


5

The Sefer Piskei Tshuvos siman 263:10 writes that if a man lights he makes the bracha first because he is not mekabel shabbas with his lighting(unless he wants to take shabbas in with lighting,then he should light first). See footnote 32 which brings sources such as Eishel Avraham and the Aruch Hashulchan seif 13,there is an opnion brought in the footnote ...


4

R' Ari Enkin has a great article on this: http://www.torahmusings.com/2011/03/jesus/ He theorizes that it is preferable to wish another Merry Christmas than Merry Xmas On a related note, there does not seem to be any halachic advantage to using “Xmas” over “Christmas” as many are accustomed to do. This is because “X” (the Greek letter “Chi”) is not only ...


3

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


3

As explained in Shulchan Aruch HaRav the majority opinion among Rishonim is to say a bracha on washing when dipping vegetables the way we are with Karpas. Tosfos כל שטיבולו disagrees, and therefore we don't say a blessing (as it is a safek). There is a common practice to rely on this opinion completely and not wash at all for dipped vegetables. So in this ...


3

The reason that pas haba b'kisanin is not a hamotzi is because it is made in such a way that it is not eaten as bread (Beis Yosef 168 s.v. ומה), even though it still is bread (Rambam Hil. Berachos 3:9, although Taz 168:10 implies otherwise). Something which is added in but does not remove the bread from being eaten as normal bread does not create this ...


3

Rambam Hilchos Chanuka 3:5: ולמה מברכין על יום טוב שני, והם לא תיקנוהו אלא מפני הספק--כדי שלא יזלזלו בו. Why do we make a blessing on the second day of Yom Tov, as it was only established as a safek? In order that people do not come to disrespect the day If Yom Tov sheni was dealt with differently, in ways that treat it on a lower level due to ...


2

I suspect (but have no source for claiming) that it may be a corruption of one of these traditions, cited in Nit'e Gavriel (Nisuin volume 1): When the groom is beneath the wedding canopy is an es ratzon, time of willingness, when God grants his prayers. (Chapter 18, footnote 13.) It was customary that, during the wedding meal, the master of ceremonies ...


2

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


2

I am basing this off of a tape I heard from R' Dovid Orlofsky - he did not cite his source, but a close student of his told me that a lot of what he says is from HaRav Moshe Shapiro. If we would say "thank you for making me a Jew" in the positive, it would put a certain focus on us as filling that role, as if we were living up to everything that that ...


1

There's a concept called "תדיר ושאינו תדיר, תדיר קודם", which loosely translated means "between something frequent and something infrequent, we do the frequent first" (see Mishna Zevachim 10:1). In this case, since motsi is frequent and al achilat matzah is infrequent, we say motsi first. The Sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe's לקוטי טעמים ומנהגים להגדה של פסח ...


1

The שלמי חגיגה in 6:(4) (starting on page 30) has 2 long pieces discussing this – and from what I understand, women and Eved Knani are incidentally similar in their obligations. (Not completely incidental, as their dispensations have the same source: both the Eved Knani and the Married Woman have another Boss besides for the Torah. He discusses that too.) ...


1

The Brachos of "shLo asani Goy, Eved, and Ishah " are one group and we are thanking Hashem for obligating us in Mitzvot as each one has more obligations than the other. It has nothing to do with thanking Hashem for creating them the gender they were born as. So the bracha is "Thank you Hashem for making me obligated in even time bound Mitzvot" and not ...



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