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Batel BeShishim - this means means that something is nullified one part in 60. So one part of something forbidden to 60 parts of something permitted. This is derived from a verse, but the idea is that once something is one to sixty you can be assured that the taste is not there. The classic case is if a drop of milk spills into a large pot of meat stew - if ...


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The OU says that powdered milk, when evaluating bittul, they look at the powdered form, not the reconstructed amount (unlike grape juice concentrate where they look at the volume when reconstructed). However, in the case you present, the milk was reconstructed prior. That is more a case of Chanan, which does not apply here because it only applies to Issur ...


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I asked my LOR and he showed me the mishnah in trumos (Perek 5 Mishnah 8) which is the original source of the machlokes. If 1 piece of chulin falls into a 100 pieces of chulin, it is batel. If a second piece of trumah falls in, then there is a machlokes as to whether it was now considered 2 in a 100 (1 in 50) and asur or 1 in 101 and batel again. This ...


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AFAIK that kitniyot is nullified in a majority is universally agreed upon. The Rama (OC 453:1) writes that we do not forbid a mixture into which kitniyot fell, and the Mishna Berura there notes that obviously this means that there must be at least a majority of non-kitniyot and that if any piece of kitniyot is visible (nikkar) one must pick it out.


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The phrases refer to the nullification of an unacceptable substance (the first, in a larger substance 60 times the amount, the second in general) intentionally. Often, the presence of a forbidden substance can be nullified AFTER THE FACT if there is a halachic method, but one cannot go into a situation introducing a forbidden substance with the a priori ...


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Assuming I understand your question correctly, batel b'shishim applies to both rabbinically and torah prohibited foods. It's basically the ratio at which chazal felt a tiny quantity of food became relevant. However keep in mind it only applies to food when you can't separate the two foods. If a piece of non-kosher cheese fell into a bowl full of pieces of ...


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The earliest source is the gemarah. Gemarah Shabbat 77a says that the standard ratio for dilution of wine with water (diluting wine was common in those times) was 3:1. The gemarah in Avoda Zara 73b says that if you have two cups of wine, one of which is forbidden and one isn't, and mix the two together, the resulting mixture is permitted. The Raavad and ...



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