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Shulchan Aruch O.C. 448:5 rules that chometz which is found in your home after Pesach, even if you nullified it, is forbidden. The Tur there (cited by Magen Avraham and Taz) explains that we are worried that a person will say he nullified it even if he didn't. This isn't a problem for those crumbs that you don't want anyways. But for that box of cheerios ...


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Shulchan Aruch HaRav (OC 431:4) writes that the Chachamim don't allow you to retain Chametz on your property during Pesach for two reasons: 1) You may not mean it when you say it is hefker and 2) you may forget and go eat it. So if you are going to keep Chametz in your closet over Pesach, hefker won't be enough, it has to be sold. Selling Chametz is a much ...


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Batel BeShishim - this means means that something is nullified one part in 60. So one part of something forbidden to 60 parts of something permitted. This is derived from a verse, but the idea is that once something is one to sixty you can be assured that the taste is not there. The classic case is if a drop of milk spills into a large pot of meat stew - if ...


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The seffer Maadanei HaShulchan in סימן פ׳ט s.v. 33 & 34 says that the תבשיל של בשר and תבשיל של גבינה which are subject to the minhag to be treated as real meat and milk as far as waiting goes, are specifically referring to תבשיל which do not have ששים and therefore do have טעם of whichever מין Is under discussion. At a surface glance he does not seem ...


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The OU says that powdered milk, when evaluating bittul, they look at the powdered form, not the reconstructed amount (unlike grape juice concentrate where they look at the volume when reconstructed). However, in the case you present, the milk was reconstructed prior. That is more a case of Chanan, which does not apply here because it only applies to Issur ...


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The phrases refer to the nullification of an unacceptable substance (the first, in a larger substance 60 times the amount, the second in general) intentionally. Often, the presence of a forbidden substance can be nullified AFTER THE FACT if there is a halachic method, but one cannot go into a situation introducing a forbidden substance with the a priori ...


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According to the explicit specifications of the halakhah, the only amount which is required by law to be removed is that of a kezayith. Or, if there are several pieces of hamess that, when gathered together, would equal the amount of a kezayith or more - in the same room - then it is required to remove them. (cf. Rambam, Mishneh Thorah, Hilkhoth Hamess ...


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The formulation for bitul chametz is is כל חמירא וחמיעא דאיכא ברשותי, דחזיתיה ודלא חזיתיה, דבערתיה ודלא בערתיה, לבטיל ולהוי הפקר כעפרא דארעא" Significant amounts of chametz cannot be nullified since it wouldn't realistically be possible to see it as "dust."


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The original practice of Bittul (Pesachim 6b) was for after one searched for and found all Chametz, and essentially we are left a concern that maybe he will find something small on Pesach that he missed, essentially saying "that too is as irrelevant as dust." It does not help for a locked away closet full of Chametz. That being said, as a Torah matter, it ...



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