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2

As you mentioned, "רפואה" can mean both things: healing an existing disease, or preventing a future one. Rashi himself asks your question. He brings the midrash, which reads the passuk as "I will put none of the sicknesses upon thee... (yet if I will, it will be as though I didn't), for I am the LORD that healeth thee." The Siftei Chachamim explain that ...


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This is my own reasoning; I don't have a source. Israel of course experienced other miracles before the yam suf, but until then they were still under Paro's control. They were not completely free to serve God and, ultimately, enter the covenant at Sinai. They could certainly have praised God for the earlier miracles (and maybe they did for all we know), ...


1

The Maharal (Gevuros Hashem 19) writes that they were specifically left alive to be counter-weights to Moshe and Aharon. The Jewish people were granted such great leaders as Moshe and Aharon, זה לעומת זה Hashem left Dasan and Aviram to oppose and challenge them and, so to speak, keep the balance.


7

I collected a few links that discuss this question, with several different suggestions for an answer. For example: The Rosh says that only those who did not believe in the Exodus died in the plague of darkness. The Chatam Sofer says that they were kept alive so that the miracle of the ground opening up will be done especially for them. See more in the links ...


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Ateres Hamikra - page 80 brings this question. He says that Moshe feared that they would punish him as a false prophet whose punishment is with stoning.


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I couldn't find many references to the specific act of stoning, since I think most would think of this as using a popular phrase. But I agree with the premise of your question, that the Torah doesn't write stuff for no reason, so it would be interesting to learn why Moses picked stoning specifically. This is a suggestion for a partial answer. Sanhedrin 7b: ...


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Without any sources, I think Pharoh is how you perceived Pharoh subjectively when you are in Mitzrayim. He is the Pharoh, he defines society and there is nothing else. Once you have left Mitzrayim then you know objectively that there is a country called Mitzrayim which has a king. This was the essence of the entire geulah, that the avadim should know there ...


6

According to R. Amnon Bazak, there is no source, and it in fact goes against tradition. Although the custom to recite "Parshat ha-Man" appears in the first siman of Shulchan Aruch, there it is a practice for every day, "in order that one should believe that his food comes with divine providence." This practice was not widely accepted. Some poskim quote a ...


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We see that the war occured after the miracle of water coming from the stone when Bnai Yisrael complained abot the lack of water in Rephidim. Rav Hirsch points out that the Bnai Yisrael complained about the lack of water in Rephidim. Had they just waited one more day, they would have reached Chorev (Sinai) and received the water there. As it says in 17:6, ...


3

Actually, that's not that far off -- about a factor of two. Archaeologists tell us that an ancient Israelite ate about 330-440 pounds of wheat and barley per year. Since the Israelites in Sh'mot were active all day (nobody's sedentary in a moving camp), let's assume the upper end of that -- it might have even been somewhat higher. 2.5 liters of barley is ...


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Chab.org tranlates דַּבֵּר אֶל בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וְיָשֻׁבוּ וְיַחֲנוּ לִפְנֵי פִּי הַחִירֹת בֵּין מִגְדֹּל וּבֵין הַיָּם לִפְנֵי בַּעַל צְפֹן נִכְחוֹ תַחֲנוּ עַל הַיָּם: Speak to the children of Israel, and let them turn back and encamp in front of Pi hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea; in front of Baal Zephon, you shall encamp opposite ...


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surely if Pharaoh's heart is hardened then the Egyptians hearts will be hardened also? Actually, this is not so. Par'o hardened his heart since (as Rav Hirsch explains in 14:5) it appeared that Bnai Yisrael "turned back" because Hashem could not defeat Baal Tzefon. Par'o was able to talk his people into chasing the Jews because they thought that Ba'al ...


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Yes, it did occur between the Exodus and Matan Torah. First, the transitional language between scenes tells us this; and second, Numbers 33:15: וַיִּסְע֖וּ מֵרְפִידִ֑ם וַֽיַּחֲנ֖וּ בְּמִדְבַּ֥ר סִינָֽי׃ And they journeyed from Rephidim (the location of the Amalekite attack), and pitched in the wilderness of Sinai (the site of Har Sinai). As for ...


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Rav Hirsch in Vay'chi 50:25 points out that this oath was not just designed to bind the brothers, but was meant to bind whichever generation actually managed to leave Mitzraim. Thus, he could not make the original oath use the word Itchem. However, when the exodus actually occurred, the oath then took effect and the word "itchem" now applied.



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