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7

I collected a few links that discuss this question, with several different suggestions for an answer. For example: The Rosh says that only those who did not believe in the Exodus died in the plague of darkness. The Chatam Sofer says that they were kept alive so that the miracle of the ground opening up will be done especially for them. See more in the links ...


6

According to R. Amnon Bazak, there is no source, and it in fact goes against tradition. Although the custom to recite "Parshat ha-Man" appears in the first siman of Shulchan Aruch, there it is a practice for every day, "in order that one should believe that his food comes with divine providence." This practice was not widely accepted. Some poskim quote a ...


3

What is a malakh? There are a number of opinions, I will discuss one of the most famous, that of the Rambam in the Moreh. I've included the pertinent parts of the extensive discussion of the subject of malakhim in the Moreh, down below. To summarize the Rambam's points, Malakh HASHEM can refer to a variety of entities, forces, thoughts and/or persons who ...


3

Actually, that's not that far off -- about a factor of two. Archaeologists tell us that an ancient Israelite ate about 330-440 pounds of wheat and barley per year. Since the Israelites in Sh'mot were active all day (nobody's sedentary in a moving camp), let's assume the upper end of that -- it might have even been somewhat higher. 2.5 liters of barley is ...


3

As you mentioned, "רפואה" can mean both things: healing an existing disease, or preventing a future one. Rashi himself asks your question. He brings the midrash, which reads the passuk as "I will put none of the sicknesses upon thee... (yet if I will, it will be as though I didn't), for I am the LORD that healeth thee." The Siftei Chachamim explain that ...


3

I know this is a bit late, but some may find this useful: Israel Yevin says that "rolled up pe" (פ' לפופה) and other "curved letters" (אותיות עקומות) appear in Masoretic notes. He says "such forms were only used in a few MSS. The rolled up pe, for instance, is much used in Yemenite MSS." (Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah, p. 48).


2

The Mishna Berura (685 sk 18) only recommended this practice for Parashat Zakhor, seemingly because it may be a biblical obligation (ShA OC 685:7). Betzel HaChokhma (6:50) said this applies to any readings being used to fulfill the Mitzva (eg. on Purim morning, if someone missed Zakhor). Ketzot haShulchan (3:84:13 footote 22) said to read one way in Shvi'i ...


2

Shmos 16:2 was the initial complaint when they left Egypt because they had not yet learned to fully trust in Hashem. He sent the manna and gave them the chance to learn how to follow his orders. Note that He gave them the chance to not leave any over and to refrain from gathering on Shabbat. 17:2 contains the complaint about water and the miracle of striking ...


1

Lets look at this "change" they had the following way: You have a cleaner that always cleans for you and you love her work, in fact she is amazing at it! One day she gets up and asks you is she can leave for three days and you say yes. So now you will have to clean yourself for the next three days. Now you tell yourself "Okay I can do this for 3 days its ...


1

The Maharal (Gevuros Hashem 19) writes that they were specifically left alive to be counter-weights to Moshe and Aharon. The Jewish people were granted such great leaders as Moshe and Aharon, זה לעומת זה Hashem left Dasan and Aviram to oppose and challenge them and, so to speak, keep the balance.


1

I couldn't find many references to the specific act of stoning, since I think most would think of this as using a popular phrase. But I agree with the premise of your question, that the Torah doesn't write stuff for no reason, so it would be interesting to learn why Moses picked stoning specifically. This is a suggestion for a partial answer. Sanhedrin 7b: ...


1

This is my own reasoning; I don't have a source. Israel of course experienced other miracles before the yam suf, but until then they were still under Paro's control. They were not completely free to serve God and, ultimately, enter the covenant at Sinai. They could certainly have praised God for the earlier miracles (and maybe they did for all we know), ...


1

The Rashbam translates לנסותכם as bothering. Hashem put them through the grind. They never had physical insurance of food for the next day, and they had to collect an exact amount. People usually don't appreciate war time rations. This was to see if they'll follow, and trust in, Hashem.


1

Please read the verse in context: The Jews are leaving the camp every day to gather manna. They're told that there will be no manna on Shabbat, gather double on Friday. "Everyone should stay in their place on Shabbat." I.e. don't gather manna! The Talmud says this means two things: A.] Don't carry in a public thoroughfare. B.] Don't walk far beyond the ...


1

We don't decide practical rules from our own reading of the text of the Pentateuch. There have been millennia of exegesis, expounding, debates, and decisions by those wiser than us in the ways of the Torah to guide us. The rule of not going far has specific parameters, and there has been much ink spilled on that topic. Likewise the requirement to attend ...


1

Yes, it did occur between the Exodus and Matan Torah. First, the transitional language between scenes tells us this; and second, Numbers 33:15: וַיִּסְע֖וּ מֵרְפִידִ֑ם וַֽיַּחֲנ֖וּ בְּמִדְבַּ֥ר סִינָֽי׃ And they journeyed from Rephidim (the location of the Amalekite attack), and pitched in the wilderness of Sinai (the site of Har Sinai). As for ...


1

One of the purposes of halakhic Midrash was the exegesis of the Bible. In this regard, the halakhic midrash extant for the Book of Exodus comes from the school of R. Ishmael, which is the Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael. The word Mekhilta comes from the Aramaic word מכילתא, which means a collection of rules of interpretation, which is what we today would call ...


1

Rav Hirsch in Vay'chi 50:25 points out that this oath was not just designed to bind the brothers, but was meant to bind whichever generation actually managed to leave Mitzraim. Thus, he could not make the original oath use the word Itchem. However, when the exodus actually occurred, the oath then took effect and the word "itchem" now applied.



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