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7

I collected a few links that discuss this question, with several different suggestions for an answer. For example: The Rosh says that only those who did not believe in the Exodus died in the plague of darkness. The Chatam Sofer says that they were kept alive so that the miracle of the ground opening up will be done especially for them. See more in the links ...


6

According to R. Amnon Bazak, there is no source, and it in fact goes against tradition. Although the custom to recite "Parshat ha-Man" appears in the first siman of Shulchan Aruch, there it is a practice for every day, "in order that one should believe that his food comes with divine providence." This practice was not widely accepted. Some poskim quote a ...


3

Actually, that's not that far off -- about a factor of two. Archaeologists tell us that an ancient Israelite ate about 330-440 pounds of wheat and barley per year. Since the Israelites in Sh'mot were active all day (nobody's sedentary in a moving camp), let's assume the upper end of that -- it might have even been somewhat higher. 2.5 liters of barley is ...


2

As you mentioned, "רפואה" can mean both things: healing an existing disease, or preventing a future one. Rashi himself asks your question. He brings the midrash, which reads the passuk as "I will put none of the sicknesses upon thee... (yet if I will, it will be as though I didn't), for I am the LORD that healeth thee." The Siftei Chachamim explain that ...


1

The Maharal (Gevuros Hashem 19) writes that they were specifically left alive to be counter-weights to Moshe and Aharon. The Jewish people were granted such great leaders as Moshe and Aharon, זה לעומת זה Hashem left Dasan and Aviram to oppose and challenge them and, so to speak, keep the balance.



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