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they were able to survive because they had hope. the books of the prophets provide clear predictions that eventually the temple would be rebuilt permanently, the messiah would come, no more wars, etc.


1

As mentioned by Mike, the destruction of the Second Temple was like the climax of a slowly moving glacier that eventually splashes into the ocean. Even after the rebellion finally started, it took nearly three years for the Romans to fully conquer the Galilee and the North and then finally pivot down to Jerusalem. This gave enough time for the non-Zealot ...


5

The Talmud (Gittin 56a) relates the following about the Zealot-Pharisee relationship: The biryoni [presumed to be Zealots] were then in the city. The Rabbis said to them: Let us go out and make peace with them [the Romans]. They would not let them, but on the contrary said, Let us go out and fight them. The Rabbis said: You will not succeed. They then ...


2

I understand the Rambam below is referring to your chapter (so no it is refuring to the one not yet built (it shloud be speedily rebuilt) The rambam  » Mishneh Torah» Sefer Avodah » Beit Habechirah »  1 » 4 The [design of the] structure built by [King] Solomon is described explicitly in [the Book of] Kings. [In contrast, the design of] the Messianic ...


2

"History is written by the victor," as they say. In the case of the Second Temple period, however, virtually everyone lost, so interpreting history can be a matter of dispute. In Jewish tradition, it is, however, indisputable that the Pharisees were the "good guys" and the Sadducees were the "bad guys". As alluded to by Scimonster, towards the end of the ...


5

Judaism was able to survive the destruction of the Second Temple because Rabbi Yohanan ben Zakkai set up an academy in Yavne where Torah could be taught and a generation of sages figured out how to convert Biblical, sacrifice-oriented Judaism into Rabbinic Judaism, centered on prayer, study, and righteous deeds. From Avot d' Rabbi Natan 4:5 Once, Rabban ...


8

I have also thought about the same question and have come up with seems most logical to me. I too think that talking about "God living" in the Beit HaMikdash causes many unnecessary misconceptions, So I think a better way of explaining it is like this: The Temple was not a house but rather a meeting place, like an office where the "CEO sitting on the other ...


1

There is such an idea from the Shu"t Bais Ridvaz siman 38 where he holds that the western wall is part of the Azarah,like the shitta of the Radvaz. The Chachmas Adam Shaarei Tzedek Mishpatei Ha'aretz also held the same: שערי צדק שער משפטי הארץ חכמת אדם פרק יא סעיף יג ח) צריך לזהר מאוד שלא יכנס במקום המקדש שכולנו טמאים מתים, והנכנס בטומאה חייב כרת, ...



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