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The Talmud (Arachin 3b) informs us that the Kohanim were exempt from wearing the Tefillah shel Yad while servicing in the Temple because it would constitute a separation between the priestly garments and the skin. The Tefillah shel Rosh could still be worn, and the priestly garments on the head were worn in such a way as to leave room in the front for the ...


6

It seems like the Tifferes Yisroel (Yochin 14) there understands this to mean that the Temple workers were there to take the clothes back from them and return them to storage - and not that they actually physically removed the clothes from their bodies.


6

There is no stone on the exposed kotel which is opposite the kodesh hakadoshim. However if you go to the tunnel tours there is a spot marked which is. See this page for maps and pictures: http://www.generationword.com/jerusalem101/38-western-wall-tunnels.html


4

The sefer Tal Oros Vol.1 here explains at length the historical background behind this teaching, but I'll summarize his main points: Everyone is familiar with the victory of the Maccabeans against the Greeks from the story of Chanukah, but few people know that the fight against the Greeks did not cease at that time, but continued on for several decades. ...


4

A few of the sources are: Zohar based on Chagai 2:9 גָּדוֹל יִהְיֶה כְּבוֹד הַבַּיִת הַזֶּה הָאַחֲרוֹן, מִן-הָרִאשׁוֹן says that the third Bais haMikdash will be built by Hashem. Yalkut Shimoni Tehilim 848 on Tehilim 93:5 עֵדֹתֶיךָ, נֶאֶמְנוּ מְאֹד--לְבֵיתְךָ נַאֲוָה-קֹדֶשׁ: ה', לְאֹרֶךְ יָמִים explains that when the house of Hashem will be built by ...


4

Per this article, this is based on Rashi, whose source is Midrash Tanchuma, Pekudei, sec. 11.


4

The commentaries on the Rambam discuss it, with regards to the Me'il (which appears to have had four corners). If there were fringes attached, it's missing from any documentation we have about them! Minchas Mordechai al haTorah discusses this question and several proposed answers, but the strongest one appears to be that when the Torah says "put fringes on ...


3

Good try, but no, not that washing. In the late Second Temple period, it became common practice for most Jews, even non-kohanim, to try to keep all food as non-tamei as possible, as if it were terumah or a sacrifice. (Terumah -- not just bread, but even wine or oil -- would require hand-washing before consumption.) Thus, they would wash before any ...


3

According to the Ra'avad, Har Habayis (Temple Mount) does not have Kedusha nowadays, so there would be no halachik issue with visiting any part of it. However, most poskim assume like the Rambam that Har Habayis retains its kedusha even though the Beis haMikdash has been destroyed. This means people can only visit areas that are allowed based on their ...


3

Exodus Rabah 51:3, (third paragraph in your link) מהו משכן שני פעמים א"ר שמואל בר מרתא שנתמשכן שני פעמים על ידיהם זהו שאנשי כנסת הגדולה אומרים (נחמיה א) חבול חבלנו לך ולא שמרנו את המצות ואת החוקים ואת המשפטים מהו חבול חבלנו לך הוי שנתמשכן ב' פעמים ואין חבול אלא משכון שנאמר (דברים כד) לא יחבול רחים ורכב לכך כתיב אלה פקודי המשכן משכן העדות ב' ...


3

All utensils in the Mikdash had multiple copies. It's an explicit Mishna in Chagiga - last Mishna (3:8), actually: כל הכלים שהיו במקדש, היו להם שניים ושלישים; אם נטמאו הראשונים, יביאו השניים תחתיהן.‏ So they surely had a few large containers and they could use them all if needed. As to why they covered the coals? As you said, you don't want ...


3

At least one of the garments required assistance in dressing/undressing - the אבנט (the belt), which was 32 amos long (more than 48 feet)! Also, the winding of the head covering would probably also require assistance. The Mishnah in Shekalim 5:2 mentions "Pinchas the Dresser", and the gemara Yerushalmi Shekalim 22b says that he dressed the Kohen Gadol.


3

There is a YouTube video demonstrating a Minecraft project of the first Bet Hamikdash, as well as of the Mishkan, as a project by Rabbi Swigard's class in Harkam Hillel Hebrew Academy, 2012. Here is also a link to the Minecraft skin and map. In this way, if you have Minecraft, you can walk through the Bet Hamikdash yourself.


3

You cannot benefit (hana'a) from items of Hekdesh or you may violate the Biblical prohibition of meilah. Viewing an item would not be meilah, but may be forbidden rabbinically if it is avoidable. I'm not sure if viewing an ancient item in a museum would be considered hana'a, but if it is, then it seems it would be rabbinically forbidden. This means even ...


3

Rabbi Yehuda ben Yakar (a/the primary teacher of Ramban) writes in his Peirush HaTefillot VeHaBerachot (page 224 here; subscribers only): ונראה כמו כן בזמן שהיה בית המקדש קיים והיו נותנים מחצית השקל היו מברכין: אקב"ו לתת מחצית השקל.‏ ...they would say the blessing: Who sanctified us through His commandments and commanded us to give the half shekel. ...


2

It seems from the Mishna in Arachin (25a) and the Rambam (Hilchot Arachin 4:19,20) that anyone has the ability to redeem a field that has been pledged as hekdesh. The only difference between the original owner and a secondary individual redeeming the field would be the need to add a fifth to the redemption price and the fact that if the original owner ...


2

I know there is a model in the Chabad library that is based on the opinion of the Rambam. It was made by Rabbi Dov Lavnoni, and he published a book with pictures of the model, and sources for all the design choices etc. although i can't seem to be able to find any links to buy it other than this: http://www.gilboabooks.co.il here is also a video of him ...


2

I think that the point is being missed here. There are not that many places where there is a difference between the written word (k'siv) and the way the word is pronounced (kri). This is especially true where the written word would be pronounced the same way. The reason is generally that neither is quite correct. The "real" word should be some combination. ...


2

Okay let me rephrase the question without all the commentary: How were altars allowed in Israel other than in Jerusalem? The answer is simple enough. The law was: "until you pick the one special final place, there can be other altars. Once you get that special place, all sacrifice will be there." And Jerusalem was that place. Deuteronomy Chapter 12: ...


2

In Maayanah Shel Torah, a teaching is brought in the name of R"I MiKuzmir, who I'm pretty sure is R' Yechezkel Taub of Kuzmir, the founder of the Modzitz Dynasty. Here's a rough translation: We know the the Holy Temples were destroyed because of Baseless Hatred. When Yosef and Binyamin met, and felt that their separation until now had been caused by of ...


2

Rashash and Sfas Emes answer the qustion of the Bach and explain that when Rashi says that (as he explained earlier) there was an commandment to put two blocks of wood on the altar in the morning and the afternoon, he meant that in the time of Shimon Hatzadick, there was no need to put any other wood on the altar. This is one of the miracles that continued ...


1

Rashi clearly states that this refers to the bonfire after it was set up in the morning - משסדרוהו שחרית. The Mishna at the end of the 4th Perek discusses how many new bonfires were required to be set up each day and the Gemara discusses how they were built. The passage you mention refers to the fact that these bonfires burnt all day - and all that was ...


1

Actually, according to Menachot 43a, the kohanim were obligated in tzitzit. The g'mara says (quoting from the Soncino English translation): Our Rabbis taught: All must observe the law of zizith, priests, Levites, and Israelites, proselytes, women and slaves. R. Simeon declares women exempt [...] The Master said, ‘All must observe the law of ...


1

The sefer (which I still can't find) explained that Hashem took the Yisrael out of Egypt 190 years early, and the reason why they were taken out early was because they had already descended to the 49th level of spiritual impurity, and if they would have descended to the 50th level they would have been lost forever. Therefore, Hashem had to redeem them ...


1

I'm not sure if my math or logic is correct, plus this isn't really a complete answer, but here it is: The Rambam, Hilchot Beis Habechirah 1:2 says: The Mishkan moved to Shiloh when the Shmitah calculations started (14 years after they entered the land. The Mishkan was in Shiloh for 369 years. It then moved to Nov, and then on to Givon, where it spent 57 ...


1

As explained by R' Avigdor Nebenzahl in his book, Tik'u ba-Chodesh Shofar: Thoughts for Rosh haShanah (page 240), it was David who "chose" Jerusalem, and prayed that his choice be accepted by HaShem. When HaShem made it clear that this choice was, indeed, accepted, it was essentially an acknowledgement that HaShem "chose" Jerusalem. I suppose a cynic could ...


1

The Ohr Chaim on Bamidbar 3:45 writes that the firstborn will serve in the Third Temple. שאמרו ז"ל עתידה עבודה שתחזור לבכורות Yonathan Eybeschutz writes in Ahavat Yonatan on the haftorah for Emor, that in the future, there will be atonement for the sin of the golden calf, and thus the firstborn will return to temple service. I've seen many who are puzzled ...


1

The reason I believe we don't say tachanun on Tisha ba'av is because it is considered a holiday in Eicha because eventually we will celebrate Tisha ba'av as a holiday. According to this, one should still say it because at the present time its not a holiday and saying tikkun chatzot is still needed. There are also two tikkuns ,tikkun Rachel Tikun Leah. The ...



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