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9

According to the Mishna (Sotah 9:12), the Shamir wasn't extinct until the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash. Incidentally, there is no mention of the Shamir in Rambam. Ever the rationalist, Rambam doesn't believe in demons (which were associated with the Shamir). He held that it was okay to quarry and cut the stones outside the Beis Hamikdash area, ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


6

It seems like the Tifferes Yisroel (Yochin 14) there understands this to mean that the Temple workers were there to take the clothes back from them and return them to storage - and not that they actually physically removed the clothes from their bodies.


6

There is no stone on the exposed kotel which is opposite the kodesh hakadoshim. However if you go to the tunnel tours there is a spot marked which is. See this page for maps and pictures: http://www.generationword.com/jerusalem101/38-western-wall-tunnels.html


5

Per this article, this is based on Rashi, whose source is Midrash Tanchuma, Pekudei, sec. 11.


4

The commentaries on the Rambam discuss it, with regards to the Me'il (which appears to have had four corners). If there were fringes attached, it's missing from any documentation we have about them! Minchas Mordechai al haTorah discusses this question and several proposed answers, but the strongest one appears to be that when the Torah says "put fringes on ...


4

The sefer Tal Oros Vol.1 here explains at length the historical background behind this teaching, but I'll summarize his main points: Everyone is familiar with the victory of the Maccabeans against the Greeks from the story of Chanukah, but few people know that the fight against the Greeks did not cease at that time, but continued on for several decades. ...


4

A few of the sources are: Zohar based on Chagai 2:9 גָּדוֹל יִהְיֶה כְּבוֹד הַבַּיִת הַזֶּה הָאַחֲרוֹן, מִן-הָרִאשׁוֹן says that the third Bais haMikdash will be built by Hashem. Yalkut Shimoni Tehilim 848 on Tehilim 93:5 עֵדֹתֶיךָ, נֶאֶמְנוּ מְאֹד--לְבֵיתְךָ נַאֲוָה-קֹדֶשׁ: ה', לְאֹרֶךְ יָמִים explains that when the house of Hashem will be built by ...


4

There's a really great website called: http://kehuna.org/ that contains a lot of materials online. There is another organisation in Israel called the Temple Institute http://www.templeinstitute.org/ They are extremely right wing, and regularly promote Jews going to pray on the Temple Mount, which most Rabbanim don't allow. They have prepared many Kelim for ...


3

Good try, but no, not that washing. In the late Second Temple period, it became common practice for most Jews, even non-kohanim, to try to keep all food as non-tamei as possible, as if it were terumah or a sacrifice. (Terumah -- not just bread, but even wine or oil -- would require hand-washing before consumption.) Thus, they would wash before any ...


3

Exodus Rabah 51:3, (third paragraph in your link) מהו משכן שני פעמים א"ר שמואל בר מרתא שנתמשכן שני פעמים על ידיהם זהו שאנשי כנסת הגדולה אומרים (נחמיה א) חבול חבלנו לך ולא שמרנו את המצות ואת החוקים ואת המשפטים מהו חבול חבלנו לך הוי שנתמשכן ב' פעמים ואין חבול אלא משכון שנאמר (דברים כד) לא יחבול רחים ורכב לכך כתיב אלה פקודי המשכן משכן העדות ב' ...


3

Rashi (Sukkah 41a "I nami") says that the third temple will come down built from heaven.


3

All utensils in the Mikdash had multiple copies. It's an explicit Mishna in Chagiga - last Mishna (3:8), actually: כל הכלים שהיו במקדש, היו להם שניים ושלישים; אם נטמאו הראשונים, יביאו השניים תחתיהן.‏ So they surely had a few large containers and they could use them all if needed. As to why they covered the coals? As you said, you don't want ...


3

At least one of the garments required assistance in dressing/undressing - the אבנט (the belt), which was 32 amos long (more than 48 feet)! Also, the winding of the head covering would probably also require assistance. The Mishnah in Shekalim 5:2 mentions "Pinchas the Dresser", and the gemara Yerushalmi Shekalim 22b says that he dressed the Kohen Gadol.


3

There is a YouTube video demonstrating a Minecraft project of the first Bet Hamikdash, as well as of the Mishkan, as a project by Rabbi Swigard's class in Harkam Hillel Hebrew Academy, 2012. Here is also a link to the Minecraft skin and map. In this way, if you have Minecraft, you can walk through the Bet Hamikdash yourself.


3

You cannot benefit (hana'a) from items of Hekdesh or you may violate the Biblical prohibition of meilah. Viewing an item would not be meilah, but may be forbidden rabbinically if it is avoidable. I'm not sure if viewing an ancient item in a museum would be considered hana'a, but if it is, then it seems it would be rabbinically forbidden. This means even ...


3

Sukka (49a-b) describes this and mentions that the young Kohanim would clear out the congealed wine from the shitin (a large cavern beneath the altar, into which the libations would run, see Rashi 49a s.v. שיתין) every 70 years. In a b'raisa, Rabbi El'azar bar Tzadok describes the "congealed wine" as "similar in form to cakes of pressed figs": אמר רבה בר ...


2

Okay let me rephrase the question without all the commentary: How were altars allowed in Israel other than in Jerusalem? The answer is simple enough. The law was: "until you pick the one special final place, there can be other altars. Once you get that special place, all sacrifice will be there." And Jerusalem was that place. Deuteronomy Chapter 12: ...


2

In Maayanah Shel Torah, a teaching is brought in the name of R"I MiKuzmir, who I'm pretty sure is R' Yechezkel Taub of Kuzmir, the founder of the Modzitz Dynasty. Here's a rough translation: We know the the Holy Temples were destroyed because of Baseless Hatred. When Yosef and Binyamin met, and felt that their separation until now had been caused by of ...


2

The phrase מטמא מקדש there does not mean one who causes the Temple to become impure, it means one who enters the temple in a state of impurity - see Rashi.


2

Tamid 27a states explicitly that the leviim guarded on the outside so they could sit down.


2

I know there is a model in the Chabad library that is based on the opinion of the Rambam. It was made by Rabbi Dov Lavnoni, and he published a book with pictures of the model, and sources for all the design choices etc. although i can't seem to be able to find any links to buy it other than this: http://www.gilboabooks.co.il here is also a video of him ...


2

The second rosh yeshiva in my yeshiva, R' Dovid Stefansky, told me he had asked this question to his rosh yeshiva, Rav Shach, while pointing out that the correct direction would seem to be diagonally left. Rav Shach answered sarcastically: Go ahead and face that way, if it pleases you so much to be different from everyone else! Recognizing the Western Wall ...


2

Rashash and Sfas Emes answer the qustion of the Bach and explain that when Rashi says that (as he explained earlier) there was an commandment to put two blocks of wood on the altar in the morning and the afternoon, he meant that in the time of Shimon Hatzadick, there was no need to put any other wood on the altar. This is one of the miracles that continued ...


2

This may not be completely unfounded: Talmud Yerushalmi Masechet Brachot daf 35. There, it says that anyone praying inside Jerusalem should face Har HaBayit. Seeing as how being in front of the Kotel is below Har HaBayit, it could be interpreted to mean that one should face Har HaBayit itself, and not adjust so that you face the Kodesh HaKadashim. While ...


2

You're probably looking for the bottom of 49a.


1

My Rebbe the Cheif Rabbi of the old city Rav Avigdor Nevenzahl Shlit"a is qouted to have said that it is a bizayon to the kosel to daven towards the left. Another reason why one would not need to face left is because it is an inherent safek as to where the actual makom hamikdash is located. Although one could be somech on the Ridvaz who says that the ...


1

As indicated by the other answers here, no corpses (nor anyone who had recently touched one) were allowed in the Temple. Today's synagogues are not the Temple in Jerusalem, and many funerals will begin at the synagogue, with the coffin inside the sanctuary, before proceeding to the cemetery. (If they do this, then Kohanim -- those of priestly descent -- ...


1

We learn from the Gemoro Pesachim 67 - extract: Someone who is tamei from a dead body may enter Machaneh Leviyah. Even a Mes (dead body ) itself may be brought there! The areas in the mishkan and later in the Beis Hamikdosh are described here Three concentric levels of sanctity existed in the encampment: the innermost area called Machaneh ...


1

Rashi clearly states that this refers to the bonfire after it was set up in the morning - משסדרוהו שחרית. The Mishna at the end of the 4th Perek discusses how many new bonfires were required to be set up each day and the Gemara discusses how they were built. The passage you mention refers to the fact that these bonfires burnt all day - and all that was ...



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