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11

It is logical to think that the priests were careful, so that the blood only landed on the floor, and not on the actual curtains. Regarding Beit HaMikdash, the whole place was covered with aqueducts and water channels from the surrounding rivers/lakes. These would lead the blood (and other remains) outside. For example, the Mishna in Yoma 5, 6 talks about ...


9

I have also thought about the same question and have come up with seems most logical to me. I too think that talking about "God living" in the Beit HaMikdash causes many unnecessary misconceptions, So I think a better way of explaining it is like this: The Temple was not a house but rather a meeting place, like an office where the "CEO sitting on the other ...


9

Here is a YouTube video of someone's actual Minecraft model of the (first) Beit Hamikdash. If building based on that isn't enough, they provide some links in the video description. Disclaimer: I don't do Minecraft and have no idea if these links will help. Map, Skin, Interactive tour Some comments there suggest a few improvements (quartz?) which you may ...


8

To supplement, not supplant, Cauthon's good answer, I'll note that the mishna (Midos chapter 3) says that the altar and its ramp would be cleaned every Friday with a cloth, because of the blood. (This is Rabi's statement, but the commentaries note that he's explaining and not arguing on the other rabbi in the mishna.) (It's not completely clear to me ...


6

This is a matter of dispute between the Rishonim. The Rambam in his commentary to the Mishna (Rosh Hashana 1, 3) wrote that the people observed the fast of Tisha b'Av even during the period of the second temple. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=37942&st=&pgnum=202 However Rabbi Shimon ben Tzemach Duran (Shut Tashbetz 2, 271) wrote that ...


6

There are two answers to this question both found in Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 157 seen here. First, see the Ramma who says that the type decree which necessitates giving up one's life is only a decree leveled against jews alone, עַל יִשְׂרָאֵל לְבַדָּם, not a decree which includes other people as well, as Shach #6 there explains. And as wiki says: ...


5

The Talmud (Gittin 56a) relates the following about the Zealot-Pharisee relationship: The biryoni [presumed to be Zealots] were then in the city. The Rabbis said to them: Let us go out and make peace with them [the Romans]. They would not let them, but on the contrary said, Let us go out and fight them. The Rabbis said: You will not succeed. They then ...


5

Judaism was able to survive the destruction of the Second Temple because Rabbi Yohanan ben Zakkai set up an academy in Yavne where Torah could be taught and a generation of sages figured out how to convert Biblical, sacrifice-oriented Judaism into Rabbinic Judaism, centered on prayer, study, and righteous deeds. From Avot d' Rabbi Natan 4:5 Once, Rabban ...


5

In addition to the other answers, we have some evidence that blood did land on the veil in the Holy of Holies when the Kohein Gadol (High Priest) sprinkled it there on Yom Kippur, and that they weren't too good about cleaning it. The gemara in Meilah 17b quotes the sage R' Elazar Bar R' Yose as having seen the curtain in the treasury in Rome, and it had ...


4

Any meat that was burned on the altar was dipped in salt and then put straight on the fire. It was unrelated to the laws of kashering, as we also put straight blood on the altar! For instance Rambam Laws of Korban Procedures 6:4 כשמנתח אברי העולה, מוליכין את כל הנתחים לכבש, ומולחין אותן שם. ואחר כך מעלין כל האברים לראש המזבח, ומסיר גיד הנשה בראש המזבח, ...


4

Side note See mishnayos Zevachim, 14:4-8, where different time periods are mentioned for when "במות" (altars outside of the Temple/Tabernacle) where permitted; you are correct in your assumption that they are currently forbidden (ibid., 8). Real answer The verse you cited in your question, according to Rashi (ibid.), refers to the Altar of the Tabernacle, ...


4

Kesubos 111a says: אמר רב ענן כל הקבור בארץ ישראל כאילו קבור תחת המזבח Rav Anan said: "Whoever is buried in the Land of Israel it is as if he was buried under the Altar." The Rambam brings this as a Halacha in Malachim 5:11 and says that it represents forgiveness of sin. The Chemdas Tzvi 4:56 discusses at length the meaning of this. One point he ...


4

Only the years we had a Mishkan (year 2 of the Exodus) through a few years after Shelomo's reign. Rashi (Qoheles 1:1) quotes a tradition that Shelomo haMelekh calls himself Qoheles at the beginning of the book because he saw through Ruach haQodesh that he would be the only king -- until the messianic one -- to perform the mitzvah of haQhel. The mitzvah ...


4

Here is verse 12: And you shall speak to him, saying, "So said the Lord of Hosts, saying: Behold a man whose name is the Shoot, who will spring up out of his place and build the Temple of the Lord. and now 13: And he shall build the Temple of the Lord, and he shall bear glory. And he shall sit and rule on his throne, and the priest shall be on his throne. ...


4

Rashi quotes the machlokes between Rav and Shmuel whether it was the physical plant or the number of years that the second temple existed. While some people say that Chagai means to hint about the temple to be built by the mashiach, most say that this refers to the second temple which was about to be built (since Chagai, Zechariah, and Malachi were part of ...


3

As we learned in the Bartenura of the first Mishna of Bava Basra - גָּזִית. אֲבָנִים מְשֻׁפּוֹת וּמְגֹרָרוֹת בִּמְגֵרָה A Gazis it a type of hewn stone. In the last Mishna of Midos the Ikar Tosfos Yom Tov teaches us that the Lishkas HaGazis is so named הַגָּזִית. וְהָיְתָה עֲשׂוּיָה גָּזִית לִכְבוֹדָן שֶׁל הַסַּנְהֶדְרִין The Lishkas HaGazis was named ...


3

You asked: Should we wait for the Mashiach or should we start building? Looking inside the Rambam - in הלכות בית הבחירה - פרק ראשון I see that he does start with the commandment to build the Bet HaMikdash so as to bring the Korbanot. א: מִצְוַת עֲשֵׂה לַעֲשׂוֹת בַּיִת לַה' מוּכָן לִהְיוֹת מַקְרִיבִים בּוֹ הַקָּרְבָּנוֹת.‏ However he then goes on ...


3

Rabbi Cohen of Dose of Halacha writes that it's ok: The Gemara (Rosh Hashana 24a; Menachos 28b) writes that it is assur deoraisa to create a seven-branched candelabrum as the Torah (Shemos 20:20) forbids imitating any of the kelim of the mishkan. The rishonim debate whether this applies to all seven-branched candelabra or just exact replicas of the ...


3

Wikipedia claims to be able to identify them as Other sacred objects being carried in the triumphal procession are the Gold Trumpets and the Table of Shew bread.[7] Art and Architecture of the Roman Empire. Bellona Books. 2006. pp. 45–48. ISBN 978-0-9582693-1-5 @Fred found According to Hebrew Wikipedia, they are the fire-pans for removing ...


3

Berachos 43b: איזהו דבר שהנשמה נהנית ממנו ואין הגוף נהנה ממנו, הוי אומר זה הריח What is a thing that the soul benefits from and the body does not? That is the sense of smell


3

Interesting question. However I think before asking that we must ask ouselves if we cry that there is a question whether we should laugh instead? We are so deep into this galus that the few things we do to try to remember the beis hamikdash are so hard for us to keep and the one day a year we spend on trying to tear at least a drop, to many is so hard to ...


3

This question is relevant to understand that each of negative mitsvot has a spectrum and is not an idea only. In Torah, Orthodoxy and Orthopraxy are alloyed which each other. Leviticus 11, 3 - 8: וּבְנִבְלָתָ֖ם לֹ֣א תִגָּ֑עוּ טְמֵאִ֥ים הֵ֖ם לָכֶֽם:‏ and their carcasses ye shall not touch; they are unclean unto you. Rashi summarized ...


2

I think this is what you're looking for: http://jerusalem.com/tour/jewish_temple_3D/web


2

I understand the Rambam below is referring to your chapter (so no it is refuring to the one not yet built (it shloud be speedily rebuilt) The rambam  » Mishneh Torah» Sefer Avodah » Beit Habechirah »  1 » 4 The [design of the] structure built by [King] Solomon is described explicitly in [the Book of] Kings. [In contrast, the design of] the Messianic ...


2

With regards to the short Amah, Rashi in Sukkah 5b (s"v Hanicha) says that there are three types of amos: 5 tefachim (20 etzba'os), 6 tefachim (24 etzba'os) and 6 tefachim + 1/2 etzbah (24 1/2 etzba'os). So when he says, "these four are really three" maybe he means that using the small amah of 5 x 4 = 20 tefachim. Using the regular medium amah 6 x 3 = 18 ...


2

"History is written by the victor," as they say. In the case of the Second Temple period, however, virtually everyone lost, so interpreting history can be a matter of dispute. In Jewish tradition, it is, however, indisputable that the Pharisees were the "good guys" and the Sadducees were the "bad guys". As alluded to by Scimonster, towards the end of the ...


2

Two additional points: Sefer Zerubavel, an apocalyptic work of unclear provenance, says: "Then the Lord will lower the celestial Temple which had been previously built to earth, and a column of fire and a cloud of smoke will rise to heaven. The Messiah and all of Israel will follow them to the gates of Jerusalem." The Aruch ha-Shulchan supported the view ...


2

Lishkas Hagazis - Chamber of Hewed Stone This chamber built with hewed stone served as the Supreme Court. Since it was forbidden to sit in the Azarah, the room was built half in the Azarah and half in the Cheil, and had entrances from both sides. This meant that the judges were allowed to sit in the section that was outside the Azarah. The Lishkas Hagazis ...


2

Herod did not build a new temple. The second Temple was standing when he came into power, and Herod did a major renovation on the existing second Temple. He upgraded and beautified the structure, while not moving it at all and leaving the Temple intact. Because of the magnificence of the renovation, the post-renovation second Temple is sometimes called "...


2

They're Tabula Ansatas. After doing some research I found out they're actually Roman Tabula Ansatas, a favorite form of votive tablets in Imperial Rome. They were ornamental tablets used in sacred and religious places by the Romans. This claim is given by Wikipedia's entry on Tabula Ansata, in the gallery. This is backed by the book "Lord Burlington: Art,...



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