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15

Idolatry, immorality and murder. See Babylonian Talmud, Yoma 9b: מקדש ראשון מפני מה חרב מפני ג' דברים שהיו בו ע"ז וגלוי עריות ושפיכות דמים


15

See this mp3 by Rabbi Aharon Kahn, summarized by Joel Rich here: Once a Kohain is ritually impure due to contact with dead, is there any prohibition of further impurity? This makes a difference for med students and pulpit rabbis. The simple understanding is that for non-Kohens, yes we're all tamei so it makes no difference. You want to live in your own ...


15

The Talmud (Arachin 3b) informs us that the Kohanim were exempt from wearing the Tefillah shel Yad while servicing in the Temple because it would constitute a separation between the priestly garments and the skin. The Tefillah shel Rosh could still be worn, and the priestly garments on the head were worn in such a way as to leave room in the front for the ...


13

It's approximating π, as is clear from the g'mara (Eruvin 14:1). The problem is that that g'mara seems to be saying that it's a pretty precise approximation, and we know it's not. (Tosafos there raise this question and offer no answer.) But to answer your question, whether it's an approximation of π or a miracle, it's the former.


12

The Torah made it very clear (Deuteronomy 12:5-18) that once the Jews would reach "the rest and inheritance ...the place G-d will choose" (i.e. the Temple in Jerusalem), that would be the place for sacrificial service. The Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans around the year 70, and thus there haven't been sacrifices since. Thus, many of the roles of ...


12

The relevant verse is I Chron. 22:8, where David quotes G-d as having told him: "You have spilled much blood, and waged great wars." Radak there explains that "much blood" refers to people whose deaths David caused indirectly but who didn't deserve this - such as Uriah, the kohanim of Nov, and non-Jewish civilians caught in the crossfire during his raids ...


11

Look throughout the book of Jeremiah -- the people kept believing that the Temple standing was the sign that everything was going to be okay. Corruption destroying everything? No problem, we have the Temple. Then the Jews learned (the hard way) not to take it for granted.


10

According to the Mishna (Sotah 9:12), the Shamir wasn't extinct until the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash. ט:יב משמתו נביאים הראשונים, בטלו אורים ותומים. משחרב בית המקדש, בטל השמיר ונופת צופים; Incidentally, there is no mention of the Shamir in Rambam. Ever the rationalist, Rambam doesn't believe in demons (which were associated with the Shamir). ...


9

Even if the threads are fairly fine (and we don't know if they were), two colors plied together still looks like two colors, not the combined color. Thread is not like paint. Now even if at the usual viewing distance most people would see it as the combined color, it would not look that way close up, like to the kohein wearing the garment or tending to the ...


9

Wikipedia has a set of answers in their article on Approximations of pi. That links to a terrific article on rabbinic approximations of π by Boaz Tsaban and David Garber. Tsaban and Garber summarize as follows (pp. 10-11): The rational-religious approach of Maimonides holds that, since we cannot know the exact values, the Bible tells us that we do ...


8

The Jews distanced themselves from God, who therefore caused the symbol and medium of their closeness to him to be destroyed. More specifically, the g'mara (according to Rashi there) says, they did not view the Tora as important.


8

R' Hirsch (e.g. in the long comment at the end of Ex. 25:1-8) takes the four types of thread used in Mishkan construction to represent four basic aspects of life that we humans need to strive to perfect within ourselves and unify in the service of God: Linen, from the flax plant = Vegetative - consumption and reproduction Wool died red with worm blood = ...


8

The GR"A points out the following: The word circumference (kav) is spelled קוה but pronounced קו. The gematria of the former is 111 and the latter is 106. The ratio of 111 to 106, multiplied by the approximation of 3, gives you: (111 / 106) * 3 = 3.1415 Perhaps pi to five digits is a better approximation than 3?


8

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrard model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, ...


8

There are two main opinions, one by Rashi saying that are straight lines going up at an angle, seen also in the Rambam on the Mishna and R' Abraham his son. See sources: רש"י על התורה שמות כה, לב. והציור בפירוש המשנה לרמב"ם מנחות ג, ז. ודעת ר' אברהם בן הרמב"ם בדעת אביו. וכן כתב העזרת כהנים מידות ד, ז.‏ The other opinion is the Ibn Ezra, and it is the ...


8

Although the verse in Exodus (20:22) doesnt specify the type of metal used to cut the mizbeach, the verse in Deuteronomy (27:5) writes specifically that iron is prohibited. This is similarly implied by the verse in I Kings (6:7) "When the Temple was being built it was built of complete quarried stone; hammers, chisels, or any iron utensils were not heard in ...


7

I don't think one can visualize the churban bais hamikdash without a change in life and perspective. However, I did hear of a summer camp, which had the kids build forts and other buildings, and then on Tisha B'av the counselors burned it all down, and deestroyed it. This apparently helped the kids gain an appreciation of the feelings of loss with the ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


7

I think it means that they cried because they saw that the building was going to be smaller than the Temple that Shlomo HaMelech built, which is something that you can see from the size of the foundation. See Rashi, 3:12 sv זה הבית: כשהיו רואין בניין בית זה היו בוכין מתוך שהיו זוכרים אותו בניין גדול של בית ראשון When they saw the construction of ...


7

This is discussed in Mishna Chagiga 3:8. As seen below, most keilim could become tamei, at which point they would be subject to same purification process as a person -- sprinkling of ashes and mikvah. כיצד מעבירים על טהרת עזרה, מטבילין את הכלים שהיו במקדש, ואומרין להם, הזהרו שלא תגעו בשלחן (ובמנורה) ותטמאוהו . כל הכלים שהיו במקדש, יש להם שניים ...


7

Daf Al Hadaf brings this question from Kovetz Bais Hillel He brings a few answers, two of them are below. Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach answers that when Jews went to Jerusalem for Succos they were still wearing summer clothing and were unprepared for rain. However when they went for Pesach they wore winter clothing and were able to travel even in the rain. ...


7

How about Yoav (Melachim I, 2:29)? He goes into "Ohel Hashem" (literally translated as Tabernacle in some places), and holds onto the "horns of the altar". Yoav was not a cohen (relative of King David), and if I'm not mistaken, neither is the guy who is sent in after him (Binayahu Ben Yehoyada). Also, in similar vein you've got Adoniah (Melachim I 1:50), ...


6

Rashi (Shabbos 73a, ד"ה מכבה) says that it was done when boiling the herbs to make the various dyes. (If the fire was burning too hot, they'd have to partially extinguish it so the dye wouldn't be ruined.) However, Tosafos (Shabbos 94a, ד"ה ר' שמעון) argue that the artisans would have been careful to make the fire the right size to begin with. They say ...


6

My understanding -- and someone please correct me if I'm getting this wrong -- is that for the metalworking they needed to do, an ordinary wood fire didn't burn hot enough. The alternative was something known to ancient societies, that if you take a pile of wood, cover it with clay so no oxygen can get in, and then burn it, instead of "burning" (oxidation) ...


6

The kohanim were divided into 24 mishmarim, and each mishmar was divided into batei av. So (aside from holidays when all of the kohanim worked), kohanim worked in the beit hamikdash only 2 days a year. The answer that I heard (and I forget who said it, probably the Chofetz Chaim) was that a single day working in the beit hamkidash took 6 months of ...


6

Whether the third Beis Hamikdash will be pre-built is in fact the subject of a dispute among the Rishonim. Rashi (Sukkah 41a, ד"ה אי נמי) says that it will come down from Heaven ready-made; on the other hand, Rambam (Hil. Melachim 11:4) lists the building of the Beis Hamikdash as one of the things that Moshiach will accomplish (in fact, that he needs to do ...


6

Mishnah Kinnim 2:6: אין מביאין תורין כנגד בני יונה, ולא בני יונה כנגד תורין. כיצד: האישה שהביאה חטאתה תור, ועולתה בן יונה--תכפול, ותביא עולתה תור. עולתה תור, וחטאתה בן יונה--תכפול, ותביא עולתה בן יונה. בן עזאי אומר, הולכין אחר ראשון


6

I think it helps to study mishnayos or g'mara (Midos, Tamid, Yoma, P'sachim, perhaps others) about the avoda and miracles in the bes hamikdash. (Likewise, the musafos ("yotz'ros" of musaf) of Yom Kipur.) It gives one a feel for what's missing. Reading the ArtScroll kinos helps one focus on the loss and gives an idea of the difference that the churban made ...


6

A lot of ink has been spilled on this topic. Kaftor Vaferach (ch. 6) reports that Rabbeinu Yechiel of Paris (who immigrated to the Land of Israel, with his students, sometime in the 1250s) proposed in 5017 (1257) to go to Jerusalem and offer korbanos, and mentions the concerns about tum'ah (which he goes on to dismiss, since public korbanos override it) and ...


6

The commentaries on the Rambam discuss it, with regards to the Me'il (which appears to have had four corners). If there were fringes attached, it's missing from any documentation we have about them! Minchas Mordechai al haTorah discusses this question and several proposed answers, but the strongest one appears to be that when the Torah says "put fringes on ...



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