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5

This is a very interesting and difficult question not addressed directly by any of the many sources I consulted. So here are a few relevant sources I collected on the topic. It emerges that you do not have an obligation to research the credentials of a random collector, neither are you obligated to give him much. At the same time you cannot turn him away ...


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Most Rishonim hold that the obligation to love a fellow Jew does not demand a person to feel a specific emotion. Rather, it asks of a Jew specific actions. A Jew must act towards his fellow with care, protecting his property and his honor. Notably, the Ibn Ezra holds the mitzvah to be literal. Sources are provided below: The Rambam writes: Mishneh Torah, ...


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In Tshuvas Bnei Banim chelek 1, siman 41, Rabbi Y.H. Henkin discusses this at length. He leans heavily on the opinion that this was not meant to be taken literally. So however stringent this transgression is, one would not be required to give up their life. He quotes many sources so you can check those up and decide for yourself. He has arguments in the ...


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the talmud in ketubot 17 says one should be "meurov im habriot" (lit.mixed with others). Rashi there says to strive to do the will of each and every person. this implies being sensitive to the individual needs of each person and behave according to how that person wants to be treated.


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Good question. Me thinks no, because of the reason you gave(the gemara reason being careful in how you treat a widow) and in addition she's no longer the status of a widow. Clearly a widow can marry any man(unless kohen, or the son of the previous husband). Clearly once she's re-married you cannot marry her, she's now a married woman! So her status changes ...


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Just converting it to an answer, with the added Chikuni. Hebrew is a gendered language, and uses the masculine as the default. Here's is Chizkuni's commentary to Genesis 1:27: We shall fashion an Adam ... human in old French, i.e. "let us make a man and a woman." The proof text is later: "God called them adam the day they were created." We also find ...


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Yes. Because then the possessive pronoun ־ה (which is feminine) and its antecedent אדם (which is masculine) wouldn't agree in gender. (Word gender. Not sex of the referent.) That would break a standard rule of Hebrew grammar. Perhaps you meant to propose instead that it should be בין אשה לחבירה. But then it would exclude men, by the long tradition in ...


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I haven't, yet, located any articles or sources that address this issue directly. However, there is a general rule that "The law of the land is law" - of course hwen the local or gov. law doesn't directly contradict halacha. Many townships / municipalities have already instituted certain laws that are geared to considering enighbors and maintaining a ...



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