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5

This is a very interesting and difficult question not addressed directly by any of the many sources I consulted. So here are a few relevant sources I collected on the topic. It emerges that you do not have an obligation to research the credentials of a random collector, neither are you obligated to give him much. At the same time you cannot turn him away ...


3

Practise it via the version of Hillel the Elder: "That which is hateful to yourself, do not do to your fellow man". Having taken that on board, perhaps address your self-hatred with his other maxims: "If I am not for myself who is for me? And being for my own self, what am 'I'? And if not now, when?" (quoted from Perkei Avot).


2

In Tshuvas Bnei Banim chelek 1, siman 41, Rabbi Y.H. Henkin discusses this at length. He leans heavily on the opinion that this was not meant to be taken literally. So however stringent this transgression is, one would not be required to give up their life. He quotes many sources so you can check those up and decide for yourself. He has arguments in the ...


2

First of all love your fellow as yourself is not encouraging self love. A person who focuses on themselves has no room to love others. Rather the focal point of loving another Jew is in recognizing the source of the Jewish soul which is Hashem and how all Jewish people are not really separate but make up the totality of one person. On the one hand all Jews ...


2

Good question. Me thinks no, because of the reason you gave(the gemara reason being careful in how you treat a widow) and in addition she's no longer the status of a widow. Clearly a widow can marry any man(unless kohen, or the son of the previous husband). Clearly once she's re-married you cannot marry her, she's now a married woman! So her status changes ...


2

Just converting it to an answer, with the added Chikuni. Hebrew is a gendered language, and uses the masculine as the default. Here's is Chizkuni's commentary to Genesis 1:27: We shall fashion an Adam ... human in old French, i.e. "let us make a man and a woman." The proof text is later: "God called them adam the day they were created." We also find ...


1

Yes. Because then the possessive pronoun ־ה (which is feminine) and its antecedent אדם (which is masculine) wouldn't agree in gender. (Word gender. Not sex of the referent.) That would break a standard rule of Hebrew grammar. Perhaps you meant to propose instead that it should be בין אשה לחבירה. But then it would exclude men, by the long tradition in ...



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