Hot answers tagged

9

Tosafos (Zevachim 102a, ד"ה אני מסגירה) asks this and leaves it unresolved. Netziv (to Sifri on this verse) suggests two possibilities: True that she'd be tahor, but she'd be in a state of suspense (not knowing what the outcome would be) until there is a kohen available - a yet-to-be-born son (or grandson) of Elazar or Isamar - who could check it and make ...


8

וַתְּדַבֵּ֨ר מִרְיָ֤ם וְאַהֲרֹן֙ בְּמֹשֶׁ֔ה Separating Miriam as the subject of one clause from Aharon as the subject of another clause is not syntactically plausible for a couple reasons: They are joined by the cantillation marks, which delimit "Miryam v'Aharon" as a noun phrase. The second clause "Aharon was against" is missing a verb in the ...


8

See this comprehensive and well sourced paper on the topic by one of our site regulars. Cush was the son of Cham, and the grandson of Noah (Exodus 10:6), and according to the Midrash (Genesis Rabbah 36:7), he was cursed by his grandfather to be dark-skinned. In terms of the location of the land of Cush, he writes: "Cush" is commonly translated as ...


6

If the Nun's were not inverted but were left as regular letters, it is kosher bdieved. Source: Sefer Keses Hasofer (Mahadura Tinyana), Chakira 17 (s.v. v'hinei hageonum) citing Noda Beyhudah and others (Sefer Keses Hasofer is the classic source for Hilchos Stam by Rav Shlomo Ganzfried, the author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch and is probably the standard ...


5

The Babylonian Talmud, in Tractate Chullin (24a), notes this contradiction in starting age and reconciles it by saying that Levites entered training at 25 and began to serve at 30. (From this we learn that if we don't see signs of progress with a student in 5 years, we don't expect him to succeed.) However, this restriction applied only to the mishkan, the ...


5

This definitely isn't a halakhic answer, but there is a remarkable story about the Klausenberger Rebbe: when he was in Auschwitz and Muldorf he prayed for death, and then after the war he did teshuvah. Variants of this story appear on the Yad Vashem website and in the biography "Lapid ha-Aish", written by Aharon Surasky and translated into English by Judah ...


5

Ibn Ezra and Rabbeinu Bechayei on this verse both say that indeed Miriam was the only one who spoke out against Moshe, and that Aharon either just assented or said nothing at all. So to preserve the singular of ותדבר, according to this view, might require something like this translation: "Miriam spoke - with Aharon [agreeing] - against Moshe..."


5

To flesh out Fred's comment: in Yoma 75b, R. Yehoshua ben Korchah states that the verb שטוח ("spreading out") in the next verse also implies שחוט, "slaughtering," indicating that שליו is something that requires shechitah - thus excluding fish (and locusts). Although Rebbi disagrees with that exegesis, he doesn't seem to argue with the basic fact of what שליו ...


5

Maybe because there is no independent Mitzva to eat Matzo on Pesach Sheni. One eats matzo only to accompany the Pesach, identical to the mitzva of Maror. Whereas on Pesach Rishon, there is an independent mitzva to eat matzo, besides the requirement for it to accompany the consumption of Pesach.


4

Rashi says that Hashem set this up in order to honor Moshe. Once he set it up then it became possible for the Leviim to continue setting it up and taking it down. My son said at his son's bris (Yom shlishi Parshas Pekudei) that because of the kedusha of the mishkan, not even Moshe could (physically) put up the walls. Hashem had Moshe act and He caused the ...


3

WAF has pretty much said what I'm going to say, but I'm going to try to explain it in a slightly more understandable and tangible way. This is going to sound strange and unrelated at first, but it will tie in at the end. There is a common deviation that many Shuls take today in regard to how they call up the person for Hagbahah and the person for Gelilah. ...


3

Seder Olam Rabbah 8 says the Jews left Sinai on 20 Iyar of Year 2 after the Exodus, traveled to Kibrot Hattaavah, spent 30 days there (because that's how long they ate the quail for Num 11:20), traveled to Chatzerot, spent 7 days there (because that's how long Miriam was expelled for Num 12:15), traveled to Midbar Paran, arriving on 28 Sivan or the same ...


3

The Rashbam interprets the verse (Numbers 12:1) as a reference to the Ethopian wife he married but never consummated the relationship with when he was the king of Ethiopia.


3

Choni HaMagel does exactly that in Taanis 23a. Since he was one of the gedolei hador I would assume it is ok


3

The laws of tum'ah were not given until the Torah was given on Shavuos (or possibly later, depending on whether all mitzvos were given on Shavuos). Thus, even people who touched a corpse would not have been tamei and were able to bring the Korban Pesach at the correct time. Note that in the verses about the laws of the first Korban Pesach, there is no ...


3

The Magen Avhraham (119:1) quoting Maharil explains that only when in the presence of the sick person may the name of the sick person be omitted. Otherwise, the name should be mentioned. The Gemara Berachos is where Moshe Rabenu was in Miriam's presence. The Gemara Taanis is when the prayers were not made near the sick person.


3

Someone told me today that he had heard Rabbi Yissocher Frand on an audiotape quoting another rabbi who had asked the question above and had answered it by saying (citing the Zohar) that there is more hindrance from the sitra achara against a holier endeavor so that, when the mishkan was first erected, there was more hindrance than on later occasions, and ...


3

In this book (p.28) it mentions the Septuagint translated it as Crystal. Shiltei Hagiborim gives a description that can fit a white-transparent OR bronwnish gemstone (it exists in 4 possible colors). However, he translates it from "תרשיש" so it might not be the same. ( Check ch 48,49 regarding more gemstones )


3

Pausal forms don't always come on Etnachta or Silluk, though those are good examples of where a strong pause might be. Sometimes they come on second order disjunctives, like Zakef (Genesis 11:3, Ruth 4:18,22) or Tipcha (Genesis 23:11, Shemot 33:14) or Shalshelet (Vayikra 8:23). Here this is especially reasonable as the verse is such that the Tipcha on פסח ...


2

Shmos 16:2 was the initial complaint when they left Egypt because they had not yet learned to fully trust in Hashem. He sent the manna and gave them the chance to learn how to follow his orders. Note that He gave them the chance to not leave any over and to refrain from gathering on Shabbat. 17:2 contains the complaint about water and the miracle of striking ...


2

The Medrash in Bereishis parsha 16 rejects the bdellium translation and says it is a precious stone: שָׁם הַבְּדֹלַח וְאֶבֶן הַשֹּׁהַם (בראשית ב, יב), אָמַר רַבִּי אַיְבוּ אַתְּ סָבוּר כַּבְּדֹלַח הַזֶּה שֶׁל פַּטָּמִים, יַגִּיד עָלָיו רֵעוֹ (במדבר יא, ז): וְעֵינוֹ כְּעֵין הַבְּדֹלַח, מַה זֶּה אֶבֶן טוֹבָה, אַף זֶה אֶבֶן טוֹבָה. Although I found some ...


2

Rashi Bamidbar 11:7 clearly defines it as crystal. crystal: Heb. בְּדֹלַח, the name of a precious stone, [in French,] cristal. Google translates בדולח as crystal. Here are images of בדולח. Although Wiktionary also mentions bdellium, it also mentions crystal. Thus the fact that we know that the Mahn was white - והמן כזרע גד לבן - ספר שמות, פרק ט"ז, ...


1

Ikkur Sifsei Chachamim (#10 in the Artscrol chimash) says this was one of the questions Rashi was coming to address. To paraphrase his words "about this Rashi explains that after Moshe erected it once 'by itself'(meaning through a miracle), and from that day on it was also erected through a miracle." He is apparently basing his words on the Mizrachi who ...


1

Rav Shimshon Rafael Hirsch (among others) points out that the term used is "Al Odos" which would normally be translated as "on behalf of". Rav Hirsch also states that "Isha Cushis" is not being literal but is a complaint on behalf of Tzipporah that Moshe is treating her as if she was as separated or far apart from him as the Cushiyim are in the idiom in Amos ...


1

Two partial answers: Torah Sh'lema cites the midrash Lekach Tov on the second "You shall bring" as saying that "before the Lord" means the east side of the Tent: seemingly the Levites had been brought near the Tent before that and then were brought east of the Tent specifically. (I'd think the first verse's "in front of the Tent" itself means to the east ...


1

i find it interesting that people will quote sources from commentators thousands of years after the Tanakh, and historians later still, but no one points to a pretty clear Biblical reference on using Cushi to have it refer specifically to someone of a particular skin color: Jeremiah 13:23 כג הֲיַהֲפֹךְ כּוּשִׁי עוֹרוֹ, וְנָמֵר חֲבַרְבֻּרֹתָיו; גַּם-אַתֶּם ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible