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9

It's not a contradiction. The second part is a clause which comes in to effect should the first law be violated. It's like the Rambam says: You're not allowed to substitute an animal for one which has already been consecrated. If you do, the original animal is consecrated, and the animal which was substituted is also regarded as consecrated. As the ...


5

R. Heshel of Cracow (the teacher of the Shach), in Chanukas Hatorah, explains this based on the Midrash (Vayikra Rabbah 27:5), that when it says "G-d looks after the pursued" (Eccles. 3:15) it means "even if a righteous person is persecuting a wicked one, G-d takes the side of the wicked person." So here, if the Jews are being pursued by their enemies, then ...


5

Long before it was actually destroyed, it was looted. The prophet Jeremiah kept knocking heads with the Jewish people about the Temple. For them it was "the pride of their stubbornness" -- well by golly if we still have the Temple standing, everything is going to be okay. Once the Temple was looted, that broke people's attitudes towards it as their ...


4

In the Torah periodical ישורון for Kislev 5767, in an article on "Derashat haRamban - Torat Hashem Temimah", on page 38-9 (and specifically in footnote 14) Rav Yaakov Yehuda Zilberlicht discusses what Ramban is referring to by ספר הרומאים (The Book of the Romans). Possibilities that he raises: It is obvious that Ramban is referring to a Roman history book, ...


3

Rashi explains that no one will chase you because you will be weak. The implication is that there is a superior enemy to fear (as is written in the same verse) and good reason to run. But the only reason why an army would bother to give chase is they fear the other side will regroup and retaliate. G-d is saying that your enemies will not need to worry ...



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