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5

The "birthright" as used here that went to Yoseph is the "double portion". The Artscroll commentary on Reuven cites Targum Yonasan as pointing out that there were three items that had been originally given to the first born. Rashi says: you do not deserve to serve in the superior positions that were designated for you. Targum Yonatan says: But ...


3

The OP asks about attending the siyum and only eating later at a different place and time? The Minchas Yitzchak (vol.9:45) and Rav Elyashav (I heard this from Rav Smith) both say (as do others) that the simchah of the siyum is what releases the fast. Therefore, you may eat later and elsewhere. One idea for this is the Gemara (Shabbos 118) that says when ...


2

From Wikipedia: If a firstborn attending a siyum does not hear the completion of the tractate, or if he does not understand what he hears, or if he is in the shiva period of mourning and is thus forbidden from listening to the Torah material being taught, some authorities rule that subsequent eating would not qualify as a seudat mitzvah and he would ...


2

Obviously, he will inherit everything so the halacha of "double" portion does not apply. However, the halacha of pidyon haben (redeeming the first born) does apply as does the custom of fasting on erev Pesach. The halacha as given in the Torah says that pidyon haben is required 30 days after the birth of the bechor. In most cases, a woman will give birth ...


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wiki If a firstborn attending a siyum does not hear the completion of the tractate, or if he does not understand what he hears, or if he is in the shiva period of mourning and is thus forbidden from listening to the Torah material being taught, some authorities rule that subsequent eating would not qualify as a seudat mitzvah and he would therefore be ...


1

Yes, he does need to fast. The main part of the Mitzvah is partaking of the meal. As a matter of fact, one could even eat of the meal and be a part of the Mitzvah without having heard the Siyum part. Source: The announcement made by the Rav of the Shul I go to every year for the Siyum.



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